SwedeSpeed - Volvo Performance Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there,
I have an opportunity to buy a yellow T5-R over here in Tokyo that happens to be LHD as opposed to all of the RHD ones I see. Since I'm only here for about 2 more years it's always in my consideration whether or not I can take it back to the states. (because of this I only own/look at cars more than 25 years old)
Are there any cues in identifying which market the car was made for? (Aside from looking for english, a MPH cluster etc. I need something concrete and for sure.) Anything the VIN would tell me?
I'm hoping the car is grey market from the states and not somewhere in Europe.

Thanks in advance. You have a great community here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63,543 Posts
How about posting the VIN?
That's the easiest way I could tell you if it's a US car or not
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I was told by the dealer that (I think it was the 38 or 31) on the metal plate in the engine bay distinguishes it as a California emissions compliant car.

Aside from some minor cosmetic imperfections that are easily fixable (no body damage though) and the normal faded trim, I will definitely be picking this up.

If anyone can reassure that it's a US spec car that would be awesome.
Excited.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,002 Posts
Having lived in Japan, and having shipped a car back to the US from Japan, I believe it would be safe to say the car would pass US standards. Here is the deal with Japan VS US cars...

1. Safety supports in the doors.
2. Safety rated glass in the windshield.
3. Emissions.

Since Volvo is a company that is crazy about safety and the enviormant, the car will pass US standards.

Here's my deal...
A) How much are you looking at paying for the car? You can get a decent yellow sedan for about $4,000, and nice one under $6,000 and one in new condition for about $7,000. So, unless you are about to save more than $1,500 on the car, I wouldn't do it.
B) Cars in Japan drive severe city driving. So a car with 30,000 miles on it is like a car in the US with 5 times the mileage. So a car with 30,000 miles on it is like buying a car here with about 150,000 on it, just because of the engine wear. So, I would definately do a compression check/test on any car that you plan to bring back.
C) Age is age. So, the car will have the same old plastic brittle parts here or there.
D) Required upkeep. This is a good thing. Cars in Japan have to have severe upkeep in order to maintian a valid registration in Japan, if the car is owned and driven by a citizen.

Since most of the other cars are RHD, my guess is that I GI purchased that car and sold it back to a citizen when the car became 1 year old. When I lived there as an active duty military member, I could purchase a new Volvo for about $17,000 and sell it in 1 year to a Japanese person for $38,000. So, my guess is that a military person purchased the car then sold it.

Hope all this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,002 Posts
Oh, if you want to get something special, get a yellow wagon. Sad that what I seen there is RHD.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the information RSpi.

I'm picking up the car for about 4K, so I really don't mind any of the imperfections. And believe me if I could find a US spec yellow wagon here I would be all over that thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63,543 Posts
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top