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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I needed new tires and it was that time of year, so I just went ahead and got Summer Tires without giving it too much thought. The P Zero 4 Luxury/VOL give an even more serene ride to the V90 Cross Country, even under 50°F. They are much quieter and softer riding than the All Seasons. Lateral grip is significantly improved.

I still don't feel any need for Winter Tires, but we'll see what I end up using as my winter tires/wheels when the time comes.
 

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I needed new tires and it was that time of year, so I just went ahead and got Summer Tires without giving it too much thought. The P Zero 4 Luxury/VOL give an even more serene ride to the V90 Cross Country, even under 50°F. They are much quieter and softer riding than the All Seasons. Lateral grip is significantly improved.

I still don't feel any need for Winter Tires, but we'll see what I end up using as my winter tires/wheels when the time comes.
Nice... Did the same last year, and I love them... ride is much nicer, grip better... well spent money...
 

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PZero/Luxury have sound deadening foam. Just something to be aware of if/when the foam separates and the tires won't balance.

I recently had a screw puncture patched at Discount Tire and they complained about having to scrape off the foam. I'll look for foam-free tires when it comes time to replace.
 

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I always thought you didn't use Summer Performance tires in winter because the tread and the rubber compound was not good for traction in snow. Had to replace the summer performance tires on my C300 when they went virtually bald (wouldn't pass state inspection) at under 10,000 miles. Hunted around--not much out there--and went for Pirelli PZero. Reading their warranty, they said warranty is null and void if the tires are driven in snow/ice at temperatures below 40F. Why? The tire compound which is flexible and rubbery at warm temperatures, turns inflexible and plastic at temps below 40F. The result leads to cracking in the sidewall. (I went bizzerk with Mercedes for leasing me a 6 month per year car--this is after all Maine. Got nowhere.....). So you might reconsider your need for winter tires..... Today is the first day I've driven the C300 since tires were installed three weeks ago now that it's close to 50F. Not taking any chances.
 

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Quieter is because of softer rubber which also means they will wear quicker. I love new tires as much as I love a new pair of shoes. Actually I think I love new tires more due to no uncomfortable break in period.
 

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In the summer of 2017 we looked at a 2017 CPO V90 CC with 21' wheels. it was the typicle brown color Volvo was pushing. It had summer tires. We were moving to Wisconsin soon. We asked for WINTER tire replacement. The dealer and we looked and could not find any anywhere, was not available. We passed on the car, BUT it was fully loaded, $72K.
We shopped for a year and a half. We shopped in VA, CA and even WI. We found a CPO 2018 near Chicago. Didn't really want a CC. This was the regular V90. It has 19" wheels and the fill the whell wells just fine. Love the car.
Glad you're happy with the summer tires. View attachment 49757 View attachment 49759
 

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I always thought you didn't use Summer Performance tires in winter because the tread and the rubber compound was not good for traction in snow. Had to replace the summer performance tires on my C300 when they went virtually bald (wouldn't pass state inspection) at under 10,000 miles. Hunted around--not much out there--and went for Pirelli PZero. Reading their warranty, they said warranty is null and void if the tires are driven in snow/ice at temperatures below 40F. Why? The tire compound which is flexible and rubbery at warm temperatures, turns inflexible and plastic at temps below 40F. The result leads to cracking in the sidewall. (I went bizzerk with Mercedes for leasing me a 6 month per year car--this is after all Maine. Got nowhere.....). So you might reconsider your need for winter tires..... Today is the first day I've driven the C300 since tires were installed three weeks ago now that it's close to 50F. Not taking any chances.
Correct. People should NOT use summer tires below 45 degrees (F). They're like bricks below that temperature and you'll have noticably decreased performance, made even worse if you try to use them on ice/snow.

Same story for using winter/snow tires in warmer weather. Then the compound is WAY too soft and it's like driving around on mush.

If someone lives in a place that has actual winters and wants summer tires for the summer, then you're committing to buying dedicated winter tires. That or buy some "No-Season" (All-Season) tires for the entire year and call it a day.
 

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...The tire compound which is flexible and rubbery at warm temperatures, turns inflexible and plastic at temps below 40F...
Correct. People should NOT use summer tires below 45 degrees (F). They're like bricks below that temperature and you'll have noticably decreased performance, made even worse if you try to use them on ice/snow...
I bought one of the first Lexus LS400s delivered in Dallas back around 1990. Toyota had contracted with Goodyear to develop a rubber exclusively for their tires that would be uber-quiet, and they were. Plus they were sticky, which was great with a high-torque RWD car in southern climate. Then I moved to Chicago a few years later where during the first winter and sub-freezing temps, I had no control over breaking or steering. Called the dealer and was told, just as VLD1 states, that that particular rubber compound turns to hard plastic in winter temps. Like so many northern drivers, I owned two sets of rims/tires -- summer and winter. The dealer even offered free off-season storage. That was such a foreign concept to a boy from the south.
 

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I have used all-season tires from Continental, Michelin and Bridgestone as well as winter tires from Michelin and Bridgestone in Minnesota and on both all-wheel drive and rear wheel drive. They all work, although I got tired of storing/swapping winter tires every season. My next purchase will some “all weather”’tires that are promoted as minimizing the compromises of all season tires but having improved performance. Nokian has several such tires that get good ratings I understand.


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I have used all-season tires from Continental, Michelin and Bridgestone as well as winter tires from Michelin and Bridgestone in Minnesota and on both all-wheel drive and rear wheel drive. They all work, although I got tired of storing/swapping winter tires every season. My next purchase will some “all weather”’tires that are promoted as minimizing the compromises of all season tires but having improved performance. Nokian has several such tires that get good ratings I understand.


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I use all-weathers on my other Vehicle here in Michigan. Nokian WRG3s. Really good grip in ice/snow but of course, does not replace winter tires. All weathers in MN might be pushing it a bit given winters are more extreme there. At the end of the day, nothing beats a really good pair of winter tires especially in MI, MN and the likes.

I plan to alternate all-weathers and winters on my Volvo once I use off my stocks.
 

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My previous car was a Subaru and came with summer tires. They were great as longing as it didn’t snow or get icy. Even in the cold they were OK, but I almost had multiple accidents due to their poor traction in the snow. The snow would clump up in the tires and would grow the wheel out of balance and would basically turn into skis in the cold. Needless to say, I got snow tires the following winter. The summer tires are generally a pretty soft compound that gets really hard in the cold where as snow tires stay soft in the cold and the tread pattern is optimized for moving snow. If you’re only going to run one set of tires, all season or all weather tires are your best bet as they are a jack of all trades. Dedicated set of wheels for summer and winter are the best of both worlds, but not always a realistic option for everyone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
All Season tires are fine for my use case. The average low never drops below 23°F where I live, and the average high (which is usually around when I'm driving) is above 45°F 9 months out of the year. That being the cases, Summer tires have been fine for me year round in the past on my 850 T-5R that I drove when it was sunny out, no matter how hot or cold. I'd use the Jeep and later the Volvo Cross Country wagons with their All Season tires whenever it was iffy or very cold and I had to worry about increased risk of tire damage from cold temperatures and road hazards.

7°C (~45°F) is really the cutoff where Winter/Summer tires trade off.

With summer tires on my "only car" (I don't feel like I need two cars for me, it wasn't that great), I'll probably swap to either Winter or All Season tires. Winter tires wear much more quickly, effectively doubling their operating cost. But they also give a better ride and better traction. I'll probably go that route and use them Thanksgiving thru early April. I don't know yet if I'm going to move to 18" Wheels for Winter or just swap the tires. I'm leaning towards just swapping the tires.

I do know that moving to summer tires is giving me a noticeably better driving experience - even in the very early spring. So I'm glad I made the move - even if A/S tires have always been fine for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·

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The snow tires I had on my last car were probably 7 years old and still had a season or 2 left in them. I'm fortunate enough to have a garage and I would wait till the last possible moment to get the snow tires on, generally the night before a storm was rolling in (December time frame), and would take them off once the temperatures where consistently above 40*F. People chew them up driving on them a lot in warm weather. If you use them as intended they will last you a long time. I would guess I had roughly 30k miles on them as I generally put a lot of miles on my car in the winter going skiing.
 

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I have summer tires and winter tires for my car, as my car came with summer tires. Not only should you not drive on summer tires below 40-45 deg F, you should not store them in temps below that -- meaning, for those of us in the northern cold climates, storing them in your house (as most of us don't have heated garages) or in a heated storage place. (I store my summer tiress in my basement.) If you have two sets of tires, I also recommend having two sets of wheels, as tires can be damaged when continually taking them off rims and putting back on. Living in New England, I put winter tires on in October, and summer tires back on in late April-ish.

But there's a lot of benefit in having two sets of wheels/tires: not only are you getting the better rubber for the road at specific times of the year, but you're also putting miles on both sets of tires, and so technically you shouldn't have to buy tires as often if both sets are bought at the same time, since you'll be splitting the wear on both sets. If you're serious about driving and live in cold climates, you should not even drive on all-season tires below about 20 deg F. Winter tires are superior to all-season tires below about 40 deg F, and summer tires are superior to all-season tires above about 50 deg F. If you are buying a luxury car like a Volvo, it makes little sense to be frugal about tires, in my opinion.
 

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I have summer tires and winter tires for my car, as my car came with summer tires. Not only should you not drive on summer tires below 40-45 deg F, you should not store them in temps below that -- meaning, for those of us in the northern cold climates, storing them in your house (as most of us don't have heated garages) or in a heated storage place. (I store my summer tiress in my basement.).
Wow, I never realized that. What happens to summer tires if they're stored in cold (sub 40 deg F) temperatures?
 

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I have summer tires and winter tires for my car, as my car came with summer tires. Not only should you not drive on summer tires below 40-45 deg F, you should not store them in temps below that -- meaning, for those of us in the northern cold climates, storing them in your house (as most of us don't have heated garages) or in a heated storage place. (I store my summer tiress in my basement.) If you have two sets of tires, I also recommend having two sets of wheels, as tires can be damaged when continually taking them off rims and putting back on. Living in New England, I put winter tires on in October, and summer tires back on in late April-ish.

But there's a lot of benefit in having two sets of wheels/tires: not only are you getting the better rubber for the road at specific times of the year, but you're also putting miles on both sets of tires, and so technically you shouldn't have to buy tires as often if both sets are bought at the same time, since you'll be splitting the wear on both sets. If you're serious about driving and live in cold climates, you should not even drive on all-season tires below about 20 deg F. Winter tires are superior to all-season tires below about 40 deg F, and summer tires are superior to all-season tires above about 50 deg F. If you are buying a luxury car like a Volvo, it makes little sense to be frugal about tires, in my opinion.
I think the same way. Have two sets of wheels for each car we own for over 18 years.
All-season should be called No-season.
 

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Wow, I never realized that. What happens to summer tires if they're stored in cold (sub 40 deg F) temperatures?
Not much - a good summer compound is almost as stif as a hockey puck (and slides about as well) at below-freezing temperatures.

The only drawback of multi-year-summer-winter swaps is that the rubber deteriorates over time (mostly oxidation and loss of more volatile elements) whether you drive on them or not. Five years should be the limit, because if you see a bubble or crack, you have already been driving on unsafe tires for a while.


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Not much - a good summer compound is almost as stif as a hockey puck (and slides about as well) at below-freezing temperatures.
Not according to cometguy above. I was asking where he heard that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Rubber hardens and eventually becomes brittle as temperatures drop. Tires are constantly prone to stress, so when the compound loses its elasticity the rubber itself may be damaged as underlying stresses from the other components of the tire apply force. Imperfections in the rubber may also cause problems as the elasticity is lost. You can end up with cracks on the sidewall, or the tread bits can basically chip off. Summer tires don't have tread patterns that make the chipping likely to happen, though. Mountain bike tires are where that kind of thing usually happens.
 
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