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One of the two vertical supports behind the grille on my 544 is bent inward. I thought it wouldn't be that hard to straighten. I tried looping a ratcheting strap around it and attaching the other end to a leg of the shop bench, like a come-a-long. The ratchet broke. I borrowed a slide hammer and held the jaws closed on the support. I couldn't keep the hammer attached to the support all the time, but that made no difference either. I was thinking about heating the support with a propane torch to see if it would soften enough to move, but I didn't want to go that far, since it will possibly weaken the metal, until I asked here for options.

Darn sturdy metal.
 

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Can you post a picture? My memory doesn't go that far back into the anatomy of my old '62 544. If the part is removable, that may be the best way to go after it blacksmith-style. By the way, it's probably best to reject suggestions on the theme of tying it to a tree and backing up at a high rate of speed:)
Plenty of YouTube evidence about that concept not always working out real well.
 

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I have no clue,but I might try finding two piece of 1/4" to 1/2" T-bar (T-beam) steel to run in the groove, top to bottom, with the second running down the front. Drill some half inch holes in both pieces and then wrenching the pieces together with maybe some #8 1/2" bolts, with lots of heat on the center section.

The other alternative is to cut it out, put it on a press and then reweld it back in. This is probably easier.


 

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I think a tree and a wire rope come-a-long will give you enough control to pull it straight(ish). You can see what the progress is and be able to stop at the first sign of the tack welds letting go or deformation of the metal at the anchorage points. I wouldn't worry about heating the material, if it comes to that, because it's not hardened high-carbon steel to begin with, That's just cold-rolled steel, albeit thicker than the stuff used on many cars. It looks like it doesn't do much, to begin with. The way that the upper bracket bent suggests that it didn't budge the sheet metal body work even a little. It may be interesting to measure the opening at both struts to see if it distorted the bodywork. In the end, this repair may be more important as a matter of cosmetics than other concerns.
 

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How about rigging something like a bike frame straightening tool:
That's perfect! I had no idea that exists. The beauty is that it can pull beyond straight, which is necessary to compensate for spring-back. I'm not sure I would ride a "totaled", frame straightened bike, though :)
 
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