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NOTE by MyNameIdeasWereTaken: If photo bucket images are not displaying, you can see ieatglue's write-up on FCP Euro: https://www.fcpeuro.com/blog/posts/learn-how-to-replace-your-volvo-inner-cv-joint-boot

My boot tore and was flinging grease all over the transmission and control arm.

EMPI sells a replacement boot, grease, and 2 clamps. I picked mine up for about $28.

Assuming you have the wheel off and the ball joint separated from the steering knuckle you will do the following:

1. Remove the axle bolt


2. Move the steering knuckle forward/backwards and slide the axle through.

3. Using a pickle fork, pry out the rear end of the axle out of the transmission. Do this in a firm and swift motion. It should pop out no problem. I got mine out on the first push


The Damage


So much water had gotten in there that the grease looked like thick motor oil. It was very runny and milky brown in color

4. Cut the clamps off and cut the boot off using some pliers and a utility knife

5. Here is where it gets a bit tricky. You don't need to do this, but I did anyway to get it squeaky clean. There are 35 rollers per wheel on the axle. Why Volvo did this I will never know, but I pulled on the wheels and rollers fell out. The wheel will catch on the retainer ring, but go ahead and pull it off. You can do this without tools. Make sure you don't lose any of those rollers! Once the wheel comes off and the rollers fall out, there will be a retainer ring and another lock ring. The lock ring has a small split in it. Just put your fingernail in it and slide it out of the groove. (Pics Below)


6. Remove the retainer clip and pull the roller tripod off. I used a tie rod end puller. You can use a brass hammer, but I didn't have one.








7. Clean the axle and wipe it down. Then put a bit of grease on the new CV boot opening and slide it onto the axle


8. Hammer the wheel tripod back on using a brass hammer or some plywood and a framing hammer


9. Reinstall the retainer ring


10. Clean and dry all the wheels, rollers and retainer rings. Place a wheel over the tripod piece and start putting those rollers back in. If you get 2-3 in at even spaces, it will center the wheel and the rest should slide in easily.


11. Put the roller retainer ring



12. Reinstall the retainer ring clip. It's best to get the opening of the ring clip to line up with one of the 2 flanges of that ring. I used a small flathead screwdriver and slowly hammered it back in, working my way around. Once it seats, it clips in and you can tell it's on right.


13. Grease 'er up! I worked the grease into the rollers for about 3-4 minutes to make sure there was no dry rubbing when I put it back in. That's where wear and tear will occur.


14. Clean the end housing and fill it with grease.


15. Dump the rest of the grease onto the tripod and slide the pieces together.

16. Slide the boot up so the small end falls into the designated indent in the axle. The large end of the boot will slide into the grooves in the top piece of the CV axle.

17. Put the retaining rings on and either tighten them or crimp them, depending on what you got. Mine were a crimp style
 

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Great write up!

I recently did one of these on my buddies mini cooper S, and all of the tripod joints are very similar i guess.

I found it very odd that the oil/grease in there before was of such a different consistency than the new stuff. I dont think water would mix with grease like that, especially away from the tire being it is the inner joint. Also, for those that don't have a puller... a punch and a decent size ball peen hammer will suffice. A can of carb cleaner will save you the hassle with all those pesky needle bearings.

Upon installation be very careful that there isn't too much or to little air in the boot once it is crimped down. Too much will make it puke grease or make the neoprene boot expand more than it should. Maybe an initial crimp to put it on the car that will allow a small flat blade screw driver to allow the air to escape and a second crimp upon getting the axle back where it is supposed to be after acquiring the perfect boot shape.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good point on the air comment. I "plunged" the joint about 5-6 times to get the air out, then pulled it back a bit and stuck a screwdriver in there to get some air in. after I crimped it, I got about 1" of upward/downward movement with no air escaping.

I took my needle bearings out because there was some debris in the boot. I didn't know if there was more dirt wedged in between those bearings
 

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Great work!
 

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Excuse the noobish question, but this is going to my 1st cv axle replacement...

I'm waffling on whether to change out the output shaft seal and wondering whether I'm going to get a face full of trans fluid if I do...If it's to be expected, I may skip it since I don't (at least not yet - project for a little later in the summer) want to fool around with topping off the transmission fluid if it leaks out.

I have a little bit of a road trip later in the week and 1 project before I go is enough...don't want to extend the project into filling/topping off the transmission too.
 

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I can't speak for the S40 but it should be very similar...when I replaced my passenger side c/v axle I replace the seal and no fluid came out. Mine wasn't leaking but I figured while I'm in there...

The seal is kind of a pain to get out. It was probably harder because I was worried about damaging the trans case. Once I got it out, the new one goes in really easy. I tapped it a few times with a large socket and it went in really far. Apparently not too far because it hasn't leaked since I installed it last summer but just letting you know to tap it gently once and see where you're at and then proceed.

Good luck!
 

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Cool. Thanks for the reply.

I'm going to tackle this tonight...still going back and forth on whether I'm going to replace the seal...I'll make a decision once I'm in there and see what type of condition the seal looks to be in.
 

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If there's absolutely no seeping or leaking, I'd say you're OK to pass on replacing it.
 

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Replaced my driver's side cv axle this past weekend. I skipped replacing the seal as it was bone dry and figured, since the job of removing the axle was relatively painless, I can replace it later if it fails.

Thanks all.
 

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Replaced my driver's side cv axle this past weekend. I skipped replacing the seal as it was bone dry and figured, since the job of removing the axle was relatively painless, I can replace it later if it fails.

Thanks all.
Glad to hear everything went well and your seal was OK! So how was getting the axle out of the trans? Some seem to get it out easy, others have a hard time and some don't get it out no mater what. What method did you use to get it out? I'm assuming the P1s have a circlip on the inner splines of the driver's side c/v axle...
 

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It wasn't too bad to get out. I didn't exactly have the best tool to get it out, but I got it out nonetheless. I just used a short, about 7", pry bar and worked it around the axle using the trans housing to pry against. I was very careful not to get anywhere near the seal. I turned the axle a few quarter turns too for good measure between prys. It took around 15 prys before it satisfyingly popped out.

There is definitely a circlip and i made sure it matched the one on the new cv axle.

Popping the axle back in took a little bit of pressure, but I knew it was securely in place by feeling/hearing the circlip click into place.

I was worried about getting the axle out going in at 1st...if you youtube something along the lines of "stuck cv axle" one of the top choices is a video of mechanics around an XC90 with a chain going from the axle to a floor jack. One of the mechanics then flings the jack back as hard he can away from the car a couple of times...then a round of applause from the other mechanics as the axle finally breaks loose.

That didn't exactly inspire a lot of confidence...

Sent from my LG-LS980 using Tapatalk
 

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LOL! Yeah I've heard plenty of horror stories too but hey at least you got it out and it wasn't too bad. Spinning the axle a little after each attempt seems to be the key to getting these things out but I'm sure some are still more stubborn than others.

Good work!
 

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You shouldn't need an alignment as you're only removing the ball joint from the steering knuckle. Once you bolt that back up it will align things back to where they were.
 

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Removed both axles today since both had inner boot tears. Must say the driver side axle was a not as fast to get out compared to the passenger side. Other than that +1 on this thread
 

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If i may add, those small rollers pins you referred to.. my axle didn't have them :-/ the three rollers on the tripod were there just not the tiny roller pins. Good or bad?
 

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So I assume this is a rebuild? My axles are making noises and clicking, by doing this would it fix the problems I have been having?

My boots are ripped and grease clearly was flinging all over.
 

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Not to nitpick, but is there anyway for these pics to be updated? Found this in the stickies and visual learners like myself would benefit from them greatly.
 

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Not to nitpick, but is there anyway for these pics to be updated? Found this in the stickies and visual learners like myself would benefit from them greatly.
All pictures are displayed for me. Are you on a desktop or mobile?
 
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