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Does anybody have a How To on replacing a CV Drive Shaft on an 04 XC90 T6? I can't seem to figure it out and there is no Chilton/Haynes manual for this car...
 

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They are basically the same on all FWD/AWD P2 type vehicles.

Put jack under car and begin to take weight off wheels (but don't lift them completely off yet)

Loosen (as in get the torque off) the lugnuts.

Loosen and remove the center bolt in the hub (it holds the half shaft into the wheel bearing)

Jack up and support the car on stands

Remove wheel(s)

Loosen and remove nut from lower ball joint.

Loosen and remove nut from sway bar end link

Use a tie down strap around the lower control arm and use one hook on the frame rail on the opposite side. Pull the strap very tightly to pull the lower control arm out from the ball joint. (Do not worry about alignment, the conical seat on the ball joint will recenter and put the alignment back exactly where it was - Volvo was quite smart about that!)

Here the 2 sides diverge.

On the drivers side, there is a lock ring on the inner cv joint end. You will have to pry against the inner cv joint and transmission to get it to separate.
Volvo makes a tool that goes on a 5 lb slide hammer to get this joint to release.
I try to leave the outer joint in the wheel bearing while removing, as it keeps the half shaft from flopping around.

Prying against the output shaft case can be done, and many people have done so without damaging the case. Just take your time and use firm, steady pressure.
Rotating the shaft and prying seems to me to help, but it could just be me.

Once it pops loose remove the shaft from case, remove from wheel bearing, and then install. Push the inner joint until is is back flush like the old one was, and be mindful to not let a cv joint flop out of it's carrier even though it's in the boot - the joint can extend out past the tulip while still in the boot, and not leak, but will cause no end of problems if you let it. Just keep it close to normal (a little in and out is ok, just not completely out) and it will go fine.


Passenger side: Inboard of the inner shaft is a carrier bearing for the inner shaft (that is very long, btw) .

2 bolts remove the pillow block that hold the old bearing.

Remove the pillow block (normally they are stuck on the bearing, but are A) in the way to pull straight out on the half shaft, and B) fall off at inopportune times and can hit you in the face... (don't ask...)

Pull the outer cv joint from the wheel bearing.

Grasping the inner and outer joints, pull straight out from the car. This is a fairly long pull (2 feet) the first 1 foot is coming out through the angle gear and then on out through the space the CV shaft normally sits in.

Installation is the reverse, but again, be careful to not let the CV shafts hyper-extend and come out of the tulips inside the boots.

One other item, be aware of the inner wheel seals. These are commonly damaged and should be planned on to be replaced whenever you do this job. They are made to only fit one way, but should come with instructions on how they are installed.

Make sure when putting everything back together that you get the ball joint studs pushed at least partway back in before releasing the tension on the strap. Also note that the ball joints will sometimes spin some when you try to just tighten them. There is a torx head inside the ball joint (I think T30 but I may be mistaken on size) that you use to hold the ball joint stud until the nut starts tightening up.

Also, one other thing, put the new half shaft retaining bolt in when you put the cv joint in the wheel bearing. This makes keeping the cv joints from hyper-extending a lot less likely.

Final torque on the half shaft retaining bolts (and the wheels) should be after everything is installed and back on the ground.

Sorry, I didn't think to take pictures when I did this job on my R (I know not an XC - but the chassis is pretty much the same) again last week.
 
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