SwedeSpeed - Volvo Performance Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
I would say that 1/2 a day with water pump. On my 01XC70 I did timing belt and tensioner in under 2 hours, without doing the water pump. They will need to drain coolant, and refill and bleed the system which can be a tricky process. They may want the car over night so that the engie is cool when they begin to work on it, there is nothing like working on a engine that is hot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,281 Posts
Volvo water pumps rarely fail. Why do you feel that yours needs replacement?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
Pretty neat ^^. Wonder how accurate it is?
I ran it for the above water pump and timing belt replace with drain and fill of coolant. The problem I see is that it linearly adds the times. Thus not taking into account to replace the water pump you in effect have to replace the timing belt. A water pump replacement including the drain and fill is estimated for 3.1 hours. The timing belt alone is 2 hours. Both services together are estimated at 5.1 hours. An good independent shop would hopefully bill you for hour on the car (or some close approximation). The dealer is likely to use the time estimates provided by Volvo (This helps you if the mechanic runs into problems and it takes longer, but it also means that a skilled mechanic can get paid more for working efficiently by having more billable hours than they actually worked).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
So somewhere around 4 hours (with water pump replacement) to complete the job doesn't sound too bad. What risk is there if I wait to replace the water pump 3 years down the road?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
What risk is there if I wait to replace the water pump 3 years down the road?
You might end up along side the road with a leaky water pump. (The same outcome is possible with a new water pump, however with a new water pump the probability is less. I do not know what the MTBF of a volvo water pump is, so it is hard to quantify how much less the probability is) If you happen to catch the leak before your temperature gauge climbs then you are only out a water pump, if you don't catch it in time then you might need a new engine.

Another possibility (I have seen it happen, but is by all accounts is like hitting the lotto jackpot) is that the impeller falls off the water pump (I am talking about a steel impeller, not one of the plastic impellers that had a tendency to shatter. I am pretty sure VOLVO never used a plastic water pump impeller). This is actually a worse outcome than a leaking water pump, because the coolant will boil within seconds sending the temperature gauge all the way to the red. Then the temp will drop just as quickly all the way to cool and keep this up until you turn the engine off or all the coolant evaporates. At the very least you are in for some diagnostic time to see if the engine is internally OK, at worse you will need a new engine. Since the impeller falling off a water pump is such a rare event there is no real world meaningful statistical benefit of having a new one v. a 3 year old water pump.

I have never came across a water pump that seized, so I would say the chances of such an event is closer to 0 than the impeller falling off.

On my 01XC70 I replaced just the belt and tensioner. You have to be careful about "while you are there" preventative maintenance, as one could argue that you should also replace all the idler and tensioner pulleys for the aux belt, and replace the aux belt too. How about the cam shaft seals, since you are there too? I think you can see how "while you are there" could quickly turn into a complete engine rebuild.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top