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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After purchasing our 2004 XC90 T6 wife wore out stock front brake pads in 35,000 miles. We do live on top of hill with five stop signs to bottem.
At 35,000 miles installed ceramic pads on all four wheels.
112,000 miles its time to order new Akebono pads, also going to replace front rotors.
Ceramic pads went over two times distance than stock Volvo pads, plus lot less dust on rims;)
Our XC90 did make 15 or so trips to our second home with limited freeway stopping on 1800 mile round trip.
My experience you will get over two times pad life, much less dust on rims with no noice using ceramic pads:thumbup:
 

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Why are you replacing the rotors? Have they reached the end of their useful life?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Rotors are cheap, front rotors do have little bit of wear.
Want this to be last brake pad replacement on this car.
 

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My wife has gone through 2 sets of rotors and pads on her V8- and we don't live anywhere near a hill! 2.2 tonnes plus 235kw gives lots of brake wear! I have replaced the standard pads with high metal pads this time around and they seem to bite pretty well. I will look at ceramic pads next time though - if they wear this well. My question is what gives - do they chew up the rotors ? or don't they stop as well? The physics don't change.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My experience with ceramic pads they wear rotor no worse than stock pads.
Our 04 T6 replaced front rotors at 112K miles, original rotors still had plenty of life.
Our Jeep Grnad Cherokee has 159K miles with original rotors and about 120K miles or ceramic pad use.
Both cars stop just fine with ceramic pads, plus much less dusting on rims.
 

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So if i want to upgrade to the akebono or other ceramic pads, i don't NEED to get different rotors yes? i mean cross drilled and slotted look cool, but I'm no driving a tuner civic... I doubted that they add braking performance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So if i want to upgrade to the akebono or other ceramic pads, i don't NEED to get different rotors yes? i mean cross drilled and slotted look cool, but I'm no driving a tuner civic... I doubted that they add braking performance.
You do not need special rotors for ceramic pads.
Ran ceramic pads on our XC90 with stock rotors for over 80K miles.
 

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So if i want to upgrade to the akebono or other ceramic pads, i don't NEED to get different rotors yes? i mean cross drilled and slotted look cool, but I'm no driving a tuner civic... I doubted that they add braking performance.
at the very minimum it's recommended that you resurface the rotors before using new brake pads on your rotors - the reason for this is to make sure there's no left over brake material on the rotors from the old pads.

When you put new pads on, you need to follow a specific "bedding in" procedure. This usually means doing a series of moderately quick stops from high speed. This is important to deposit a layer of pad material on the rotors to maintain even and controlled braking. If you don't do this, or don't at least resurface the rotors you may end up with uneven pad deposits which may cause uneven braking or pedal pulsing when you stop - a lot of times this is confused with warped rotors.

http://www.stoptech.com/technical-support/technical-white-papers/-warped-brake-disc-and-other-myths
http://www.stoptech.com/technical-s...y-definitions-and-procedures/brake-pad-bed-in

Cross drilled and slotted rotors by themselves really don't do anything - they were developed back when the brake pads were made of asbestos or other compounds that we don't use today. Those compounds put out a lot of gasses (outgassing) when braking, and the slots and holes were needed to vent the gasses to prevent the pads from "floating" on the rotor which hurt braking performance. Modern ceramic or semi-metalic pads do not do this, so the drilled and slotted rotors are mostly for show.

There are also instances of rotors failing under high stress if they are cross drilled - the little holes focus the stress in the metal. If you drive aggressively or on the track it's usually recommended that you do not get cross drilled rotors. Slotted rotors should be fine - I run them on my STi.
 

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Wow, such a huge variance on brake life. We are now on our second set of pads AND front rotors on our 2008 V8 and only at 52k miles. First set of front pads and rotors were put on at CPO purchase at 20k. My wife does mostly city driving and we only got 30k out of the Volvo OEM pads and rotors on the fronts. Rears just had to be done too. They were original, so 52k on those. Very disappointed in that and my wife is no racer either. Dealer states that Volvo just makes the pads and rotors "softer" to get better performance out of them but it drecreases life. I say hogwash. My 2001 Toyoto Highlander has 117k miles on it and had the rotors replaced only once. Just put a new set of pads on front. It's by no means as heavy as the XC90 but that is a HUGE difference in miles to get out of a set of brakes.
Otherwise we love our XC90, but $1150 for all new brakes and rotors was very painful. As soon as CPO warranty runs out, it will be aftermarket and DIY for me!
 

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what do you think about akebono compared to oem volvo ones(ATE). also the 2.5T FWD comes with 316mm? rotors?. Its time to replace my pads and just want something good but not expencive.
 

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My understanding is the Volvo OEM brake material is normally relatively "soft" but allows for shorter stopping distances versus some aftermarket pads designed for longer life.
 

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Sorry to be late to the party on this posting

We have the akebono pads for the last 35k miles on a V8, the stock OEM pads only lasted about 17K miles (chewed up by all heavy urban driving) and there is still plenty of meat on the akebono pads, our indy said we are not even 1/2 way through them. (in comparison we are going on our 4th set of tires at 52k miles as they get so beat up in our heavy urban environment where there are stop signs or traffic lights every several hundred feet....)

Dealer originally said that we would get even less life on the rotors and pads than the first time on the OEM pads, guess they were wrong and mis-informed.

Best thing I ever did was put the akebono pads on the XC90, all dust is gone, wheels stay clean forever, and no noticeable difference in stopping distance.

Wife previously wanted to paint the wheels black as they were black within days anyway and if you brushed against them in our tight garage, your clothes were ruined....

I highly recommend them for anyone.

Next Euro car we get, we will have the pads replaced before even driving off the lot.....
 

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I replaced my worn volvo OE pads with Akebonos's and the OE rotors with coated Zimmerman's a couple of weeks ago. I'll keep track of the mileage. The OE pads gave me about 9k miles. What I've noticed so far is the conspicuous lack of a dust coating on my wheels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Have found over years ceramics to stop just as well as normal pads. Maybe even less wear on rotor. Have Jeep grand cherokee with 162K miles using only two sets of ceramics, still on facory rotors,
 

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Peculiar observation - we replaced the front pads with Volvo ceramics about a year ago and also replaced rotors (relatively inexpensive) at the same time. No problems at all last winter with ceramics on front and factory original rears. This spring we replaced the rear pads with Volvo ceramics and also replaced rotors. Now we observe that when cruising on highway in the rain and braking for the first time in, say, 10 minutes the brakes simply don't begin to slow the vehicle for a few seconds. It appears to this layman that there's water acting as a lubricant which must boil away before the pads will grip and slow the rotors. Repeat applications of brakes will not have this problem unless there's a delay of 5 or 10 minutes. Everything seems completely normal in dry conditions or in subsequent braking episodes in wet conditions. Most perplexingly this did not appear with ceramics up front until we also put then in the rear half a year later.

Anyone able to cast light upon this?
 
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