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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I love driving my S60 but I didn't do my homework and bought the R-Design. I now know it was designed for a stiff ride:

"The R-Design's front springs are shortened by 15mm to give it more visual attitude. Spring stiffness is 15 percent higher compared to the Dynamic Chassis in the T6 AWD. Rear damper attachment bushings are 20 percent stiffer compared with the T6 AWD. The front tie-blade bushing, or the attachment to the rear of the car, is a massive 400 percent stiffer to counteract wheel bouncing and shaking."

Anyone have any ideas to soften the ride without voiding my warranty? I have owned this for 18 months and have 30K miles on it.

Thank you!
 

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In for info.
 

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Find a quick trade? Sounds like an expensive mod to make it soft.
 

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You can get the 45-series tires, instead of the 40-series.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
yeah ... ugh hard to justify losing the equity trading it already. but you may be right.
 

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Hmm--personally, I really like the firm, well controlled ride of my RD :).
But one option for "softening" the ride is to lower the tire pressures--start with 2 psi below recommended all around, and see how that feels (measure cold, and use a good gauge). There should be no adverse affect on handling/performance/wear for street driving.
 

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Lighter wheels make a huge difference, not just smaller wheels to allow for more sidewall. Extra sidewall can make a difference for sure, but I'd hate to downsize the wheels which already look pretty weak, fitment-wise. Here's a big one: buy new tires that are rated very highly in the ride quality category in Tire Rack's reviews/ compiled survey data. Choosing a softer-riding, fresh tire can drastically improve how your car rides. I had extremely favorable results with Continental DWS all-season tires on my modified GTI, and they rode so well that I put them on my girlfriend's extremely stiff-riding Accord, and they greatly improved her ride quality as well. They also worked great in snow and rain, and offer relatively low road noise. The DWS's are infinitely better tires than the crappy Contis that came on my S60.

It might also be worth considering some aftermarket springs, or spring/ damper combos, or coilovers, some of which may actually ride better than stock, even with a drop. I'm not super familiar with the limited aftermarket offerings for the P3, but in the case of my 2008 GTI my Neuspeed Sport springs/ Koni FSD damper combo rode significantly softer than the stock suspension, and also happened to ride better than my S60 does.

Getting a quality wheel/tire/ suspension makeover for the S60 won't necessarily be cheap, but it'll probably be cheaper than trading in the Volvo early before you have any equity.
 

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You could test drive a T6 with the Dynamic suspension and if you
like that swap to the T6 springs. The front struts are the same between
the two (T6 Dynamic and RD) and the rear shocks on your car are probably going
to make a smaller difference so I'd keep those.

The idea here is it is something you can drive and see if that is enough of
a difference before spending any money (also take note of any tires on
any T6 you might drive since those would make a difference, too).

If you did that I bet you could sell the RD springs to recoup some cost.

Your 2013 RD has larger front brake rotors so a smaller wheel might not fit.
 

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You can step the sidewall's up a size to 45 from 40 like the 2014-up models have; it really makes a huge difference on the ride quality.
 

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I have never liked the short sidewall tires. Tires are part of the suspension and a 5% increase will make a difference in the feel and probably not effect the handling.
Some tires have softer sidewalls and give more "softness" but when they are under 50, they are pretty firm.

Try the tire change first.
You're in SO CAL.
Check with America's tire shop manager / Discount tire.
They might be able to find and try
 

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Slightly off topic - if the suspension is so much stiffer on S60 RD, would that mean a shorter life span compared to the "regular" S60?

I ask this, because as I mentioned in my other thread, I've had numerous suspension problems on my 2012 S60 T5 starting at 25k mi and the biggest obstacle I go over is the curb on my driveway.

n
 

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Since you're in Sunny SoCal, you may prefer summer tires to all-seasons. If that's the case, I've had very good luck with Bridgestone Potenza RE760 sport tires. Very good ride and quiet for summer tires. Used to have them on my Subaru Legacy GT wagon and found them both grippy and civilized; I just went UP in tire and wheel size on my V60 T5 (from 235/45-17 to 245/40-18) and mounted a new set. Am not perceiving a signficant difference in noise or ride, but it's much grippier around the corners!
 

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Or go for smaller rims and get even taller sidewalls...
I have 17" wheels for winter, and it does have an effect, but it's not quite as pronounced as one might expect (unless you slightly under-inflate some *really* soft-riding tires.)
 

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Lighter wheels make a huge difference, not just smaller wheels to allow for more sidewall. Extra sidewall can make a difference for sure, but I'd hate to downsize the wheels which already look pretty weak, fitment-wise. Here's a big one: buy new tires that are rated very highly in the ride quality category in Tire Rack's reviews/ compiled survey data. Choosing a softer-riding, fresh tire can drastically improve how your car rides. I had extremely favorable results with Continental DWS all-season tires on my modified GTI, and they rode so well that I put them on my girlfriend's extremely stiff-riding Accord, and they greatly improved her ride quality as well. They also worked great in snow and rain, and offer relatively low road noise. The DWS's are infinitely better tires than the crappy Contis that came on my S60.

It might also be worth considering some aftermarket springs, or spring/ damper combos, or coilovers, some of which may actually ride better than stock, even with a drop. I'm not super familiar with the limited aftermarket offerings for the P3, but in the case of my 2008 GTI my Neuspeed Sport springs/ Koni FSD damper combo rode significantly softer than the stock suspension, and also happened to ride better than my S60 does.

Getting a quality wheel/tire/ suspension makeover for the S60 won't necessarily be cheap, but it'll probably be cheaper than trading in the Volvo early before you have any equity.
+1 on everything above. Unfortunately, there are no cheap and easy solutions to the ride quality problem. If simple tire deflation doesn't help, be prepared to spend at least $6-700 (replacing just the tires with taller, softer setup), and up to $2500 for a quality coilover system. Even my T5 FWD with sport suspension had a rough ride when I bought it, but fortunately, just deflating the OEM 235/40-18" tires to 34psi solved the issue for me. In my days of owning E90 3-series (two cars, both with sport suspension), replacing OEM shocks with Koni FSD's did wonders for the ride, without any handling trade-off. I think Koni makes a set for the latest S60 application now ($700 on sale + labor).
 

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You can step the sidewall's up a size to 45 from 40 like the 2014-up models have; it really makes a huge difference on the ride quality.
Yes, this. Just get a set of 235/45-18's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
You could test drive a T6 with the Dynamic suspension and if you
like that swap to the T6 springs. The front struts are the same between
the two (T6 Dynamic and RD) and the rear shocks on your car are probably going
to make a smaller difference so I'd keep those.

The idea here is it is something you can drive and see if that is enough of
a difference before spending any money (also take note of any tires on
any T6 you might drive since those would make a difference, too).

If you did that I bet you could sell the RD springs to recoup some cost.

Your 2013 RD has larger front brake rotors so a smaller wheel might not fit.
Great idea, thanks!
 
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