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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know if the infamous XC90 headlight haze would be cleaned/treated under CPO warranty at the dealer?
 

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I do not know, but it is not too hard to polish them yourself. I am considering getting some of the protectors for mine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
what do you use to polish them? Anything aside from the Mother's product?
 

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Go to an autoparts store and get one of the products designed to do it. I used the turtlewax kit on my 94 325i and they turned out great, they were crystal clear and almost looked like new.
 

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When I did this on my XC90, I notived that the plastic they used on the headlight housing is significantly harder than most other car's headlight housings. You may need two or three kits to do the lights on the XC90, as opposed to just one for most other cars.

You will need a good corded electric drill (cordless ones aren't fast enough and don't last long enough) - I used a 3M kit. Costs about $20. Make sure to seal it with uv-resistant wax after you're done so it doesn't happen again!

The kit starts you off with a very course sandpaper to sand out the scratches and nicks, then moves progressively up to a find buffing compound to shine it up again. Very good results. Since it's so easy to take the headlight housing out on the XC90, I recommend doing this on a bench as opposed to on the car.
 

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When I did this on my XC90, I notived that the plastic they used on the headlight housing is significantly harder than most other car's headlight housings. You may need two or three kits to do the lights on the XC90, as opposed to just one for most other cars.

You will need a good corded electric drill (cordless ones aren't fast enough and don't last long enough) - I used a 3M kit. Costs about $20. Make sure to seal it with uv-resistant wax after you're done so it doesn't happen again!

The kit starts you off with a very course sandpaper to sand out the scratches and nicks, then moves progressively up to a find buffing compound to shine it up again. Very good results. Since it's so easy to take the headlight housing out on the XC90, I recommend doing this on a bench as opposed to on the car.



There is another way to do this..................without an electric drill or buffer................

Get a coupld sheets of 1000 and 2000 grit wet sandpaper. Dunk them in water, add a tiny bit of soap detergent to lubricate everything and then literally sand off the exterior deterioration. Once you go over it with the 1000, then hit it with the 2000, and finish with an inexpensive container of the headlight lens polish you can buy at the auto parts store.

I found it actually much easier to do this by hand and a bucket of water, than to try it with an electric device especially becaue my plastic lens was really starting to crack and craze pretty badly. It is amazing how good they looked later. First hand experience here, it works and very well too.

good luck,

P
 

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There is another way to do this..................without an electric drill or buffer................

Get a coupld sheets of 1000 and 2000 grit wet sandpaper. Dunk them in water, add a tiny bit of soap detergent to lubricate everything and then literally sand off the exterior deterioration. Once you go over it with the 1000, then hit it with the 2000, and finish with an inexpensive container of the headlight lens polish you can buy at the auto parts store.

I found it actually much easier to do this by hand and a bucket of water, than to try it with an electric device especially becaue my plastic lens was really starting to crack and craze pretty badly. It is amazing how good they looked later. First hand experience here, it works and very well too.

good luck,

P
this can work but you will soon find out that there are layers under the top coat. i did this with my old headlights and then used a highspeed polisher and they looked good. its sitting in the garage for the last year waiting on me to finish the projector retofit :/
 

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this can work but you will soon find out that there are layers under the top coat. i did this with my old headlights and then used a highspeed polisher and they looked good. its sitting in the garage for the last year waiting on me to finish the projector retofit :/
Any such layering was apparently already destroyed on my headlights, as there was an oxidation type roughness that I had to remove with sandpaper. There was no way ever that I would have been able to do that with a polishing wheel on an electric drill.

When you use the sandpaper you will eventually be left with a white looking plastic because it has a lot of micro-scratches from the sandpaper. Just filling this with wax would help but using the final polish and buffing (by hand) worked beautifully for us and after 8 years our headlights looked bran new when we traded the vehicle in. I saw no downside to doing this. They were so far gone I knew I would have to replace them if the sandpaper did not work.

I have done similar things with boat gelcoat that is heavily chalked over. You can dump all kinds of polishing compound on a wheel and gum it up, and run the risk of heating up the gelcoat and ruining it with an electric device. However, the wet sandpaper will cut through much quicker. You will be able to tell once you give it a few strokes and start to see the micro residue coming off the deteriorated lens.

It works guys, and it works very well. This is one task that I would recommend doing by hand acutally. With an electric drill you are not able to use wet sandpaper, and doing it by hand gives you a lot of control. It is a bit of a workout, however, but nothing serious.

best,

P
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
There is another way to do this..................without an electric drill or buffer................

Get a coupld sheets of 1000 and 2000 grit wet sandpaper. Dunk them in water, add a tiny bit of soap detergent to lubricate everything and then literally sand off the exterior deterioration. Once you go over it with the 1000, then hit it with the 2000, and finish with an inexpensive container of the headlight lens polish you can buy at the auto parts store.

I found it actually much easier to do this by hand and a bucket of water, than to try it with an electric device especially becaue my plastic lens was really starting to crack and craze pretty badly. It is amazing how good they looked later. First hand experience here, it works and very well too.

good luck,

P
Great advice. Will definitely try this. Thanks!
 
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