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Ron mentioned in my thread about removing the rear brake drums that a very thin layer of graphite would allow me to remove them easier, the next time I do a brake job. The problem I has is that Google searches show me powdered graphite for locks or grease without graphite. So, if you know a brand that has it, without buying an industrial tub of it, point me in the right direction.
 

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John;

There are many Anti-Seize greases formulations by for instance Permatex or Loctite but the common ones available at auto parts places are (amoung other things) graphite dust filled grease, and that will work well.

Cheers
 

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Don't mean to be discouraging, but I wouldn't use this product on the axles. Basically, I think it'd be *too good*, and could potentially cause the axle to slip inside the joint. It might rotate (shearing the key) or develop end float (even worse). The most I'd do is a super-thin sheen of oil or grease to make it sticky and keep out moisture, then straight graphite powder on top.

Personally, I wouldn't apply anything at all. Maybe that's just me.
 

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tm;

I've never had an axle/hub slip condition of a properly assembled Axle/Drum (I did once, but it was due to forgetting to install the key...so my fault and shame on me!)...don't forget the hub gets quite forcibly stretched over the cone given the HUGE force multiplication of cone plus thread of nut being tightened at ~100ft/Lbs, this effectively and intimately uniting the two surfaces, so there is NO gap after torquing to allow slippage, and the AS actually allows a higher uniting force due to the K-Factor the AS introduces (See: http://www.sw-em.com/anti_seize.htm#K-factor ), so that tiny bit of Anti-Seize between the two surfaces only serves to allow them to separate as the AS is then in shear in the other direction...

As I've explained before, I realize that according to the Machinists Handbook, a precision conical joint is supposed to be joined dry, but living in the real world, where I need to periodically separate the two, I've made this judgement call to modify their recommendation based on research and experience.

Cheers
 
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