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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Did you ever think, "Oh, I need to tighten this fuel hose clamp?"

I did, and I will probably never spontaneously decide to do it again, there has to be more of a reason.

So, flashback to Sunday, February 24th 2019.

I'm finishing up on a successful and productive weekend of working on my new to me 1970 Volvo 142S.

Under the hood, I make the snap decision to tighten the fuel line clamps. You could basically touch anything on this car and it probably needs fixing, adjusting or cleaning.

So I do just that and for good measure, I start it up to check something else.

Fuel starts gushing from one of the clamps I just tightened.

ACK, SHUT IT OFF!

Tighten it a touch more, it leaks more!

Remove clamp, snip off the end of the hose for some fresh rubber.

Still leaks.

Snip off more and it still leaks a little, tighten more, it's just weeping now. Ok, so the hose is toast and in need of replacement then. Take a gentle trip to the auto parts store, obtain hose, clamps.

Replace all fuel hose in the engine compartment. Yay, no leaks!

Monday on the drive to work, the engine is running rough and I can smell gasoline.

Pull into work, pop the hood and fuel is dribbling out of the rear sidedraft fuel bowl.


CRAP!


Over the next two days, I plug the rearmost carb fuel inlet, run it out of fuel then reconnect. This allows me to reach home again just as the fuel bowl is overflowing again.

Wednesday 27th 2019 all hell breaks loose and now the front fuel bowl is GUSHING out of the bowl vent. Full-on gasoline geyser.

I drill down a piece of Delrin rod to restrict fuel flow and put it inline, still not enough, I add a hose crimp and then I can drive home. Volvo gets parked and I borrow a car.

Saturday I take things apart, 'cause I'm pretty sure I know what happened. The worn out hose shed some flakes and now they are in the fuel bowl shuttle valve.

Auto part Tire Fictional character Engine


Top image, fuel everywhere!
Middle image, the delaminating, failed hose.
The image with the US penny shows what I found in the shuttle valves.

Everything works now, though fuel pressure is also a bit high as well.

Now back to doing what I was doing.
 

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That is definitely the danger of the "I'll just *insert task* while I'm here." It always seems to end with that minor effort opening Pandora's box. Fun times. lol
 

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Perhaps you should view this as discovering that you had a problem in a semi controlled manner rather than having a major / complete hose failure while driving on the freeway or in rush-hour traffic. Given the age of the car, and the condition of those hoses, you might want to plan for a complete fuel line replacement to avoid unfortunate leaks from other locations. D jet equipped Volvos (1971 and later) that have been parked for any period of time usually benefit from complete hose replacement and a fuel system flush (including tank) because the injectors are pretty intolerant of crap in the fuel and doing frequent filter changes to deal with contaminants is a poor option because of the high cost of the D jet filter and its exceedingly inconvenient location. Your carb equipped car has the advantage that the fuel filters are cheap, easily available and easy to get at (compared to the D jet) so frequent filter changes to deal with fuel contamination is less of a hassle.

In your first photo I note that you have garden hose style clamps. These are to be avoided because they have a cheese grater effect on the hose. Most automotive suppliers sell banded fuel line hose clamps (the surface that contacts the rubber is smooth). Something like this; but, there are lots of different styles and versions.

https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/dorman-help-fuel-injector-hose-clamp-12-pk-0245413p.html

They are inexpensive and much kinder to your fuel line.

I have a D jet equipped car. The fuel pressure is significantly higher than on the SU equipped cars so hose quality is a bigger issue. I initially replaced all my fuel line with over the counter generic 'fuel injection' hose which deteriorated quite quickly. I replaced this with Parker Abrasion King push on hose which has been much more durable. Gates Barricade fuel hose is also very good quality. The good hose costs about 50 - 75% more than the over the counter hose; but, the total dollars spent is still relatively small and if you are doing the fuel line connections under the car you don't want to be repeating that work any time soon.

If your fuel hose was in poor shape, you might want to be putting some eyes on your radiator hoses and the heater hoses. Having one of those fail at the wrong time could also be unfortunate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Perhaps you should view this as discovering that you had a problem in a semi controlled manner rather than having a major / complete hose failure while driving on the freeway or in rush-hour traffic. Given the age of the car, and the condition of those hoses, you might want to plan for a complete fuel line replacement to avoid unfortunate leaks from other locations. D jet equipped Volvos (1971 and later) that have been parked for any period of time usually benefit from complete hose replacement and a fuel system flush (including tank) because the injectors are pretty intolerant of crap in the fuel and doing frequent filter changes to deal with contaminants is a poor option because of the high cost of the D jet filter and its exceedingly inconvenient location. Your carb equipped car has the advantage that the fuel filters are cheap, easily available and easy to get at (compared to the D jet) so frequent filter changes to deal with fuel contamination is less of a hassle.

In your first photo I note that you have garden hose style clamps. These are to be avoided because they have a cheese grater effect on the hose. Most automotive suppliers sell banded fuel line hose clamps (the surface that contacts the rubber is smooth). Something like this; but, there are lots of different styles and versions.

https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/dorman-help-fuel-injector-hose-clamp-12-pk-0245413p.html

They are inexpensive and much kinder to your fuel line.

I have a D jet equipped car. The fuel pressure is significantly higher than on the SU equipped cars so hose quality is a bigger issue. I initially replaced all my fuel line with over the counter generic 'fuel injection' hose which deteriorated quite quickly. I replaced this with Parker Abrasion King push on hose which has been much more durable. Gates Barricade fuel hose is also very good quality. The good hose costs about 50 - 75% more than the over the counter hose; but, the total dollars spent is still relatively small and if you are doing the fuel line connections under the car you don't want to be repeating that work any time soon.

If your fuel hose was in poor shape, you might want to be putting some eyes on your radiator hoses and the heater hoses. Having one of those fail at the wrong time could also be unfortunate.


You are correct, far better how it happened than on a long trip somewhere in the middle of nowhere.

Yah, the old style worm drive clamps are going away when I fully redo all my lines. :) I have a roll of Gates fuel line on its way. The rest of the hoses are long past their sell-by date, but that's sorta this car all over.

After its rallying career was over in the late 1970's it seems to have gone through a string of college students. It still bears the cut out scar of where its rally clock once was.
View attachment 49385

(I've removed all the parking stickers, the one that barely remains, seemingly melded into the rubber of the rear bumper has a barely legible date with 1981.)

When it's life as a student transporter ended it slept under a tree for over a decade, serving as a humid spider incubator.

It was awoken in 2012 and it's passed through two more hands, losing many of it's old and now valuable rally bits until it found me. (Thankfully the vintage IPD anti-sway bars remain at least)

It has starving student repairs and neglect everywhere and it will be undone as budget and time allows. :)
 
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