SwedeSpeed - Volvo Performance Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am trying to start, or fixing-to-get-started trying to start as we say in the South, a 122s that has been sitting since 1993. It has a B18 with dual SU carbs. The new tank will be here Tues and I have replaced the fuel pump as the old was lacquered pretty good. Here is the question.

What size fuel line do I need from the pump to the carbs? Mine is missing. I replaced the line from the solid to the pump, but the nipple on the carb side of the pump is smaller. I assume that the hose should be as well.

Thanks for your responses!

Herb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
857 Posts
I am trying to start, or fixing-to-get-started trying to start as we say in the South, a 122s that has been sitting since 1993. It has a B18 with dual SU carbs. The new tank will be here Tues and I have replaced the fuel pump as the old was lacquered pretty good. Here is the question.

What size fuel line do I need from the pump to the carbs? Mine is missing. I replaced the line from the solid to the pump, but the nipple on the carb side of the pump is smaller. I assume that the hose should be as well.

Thanks for your responses!

Herb
Mine appears to have an ID of 3/8", but my line from the hard line to the pump is the same size.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. That's the size I have from the hard line to the pump too. I looks like 3/8" is fine.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,953 Posts
I am trying to start, or fixing-to-get-started trying to start as we say in the South, a 122s that has been sitting since 1993. It has a B18 with dual SU carbs. The new tank will be here Tues and I have replaced the fuel pump as the old was lacquered pretty good. Here is the question.

What size fuel line do I need from the pump to the carbs? Mine is missing. I replaced the line from the solid to the pump, but the nipple on the carb side of the pump is smaller. I assume that the hose should be as well.

Thanks for your responses!

Herb
Avoid cranking the engine until...

The SUs have been disassembled, cleaned, repaired and adjusted as needed.

All fuel lines from the new tank to the carbs are clear, clean, and have two throw-away filters - one before the pump and one after.

The new tank has been flushed before adding new gas.

Before hooking up the fuel lines to the carbs spin the engine with the spark plugs out then inspect the throw-way filters for indications of contaminants then replace if needed.

Once you have a clean supply of gas hook up everything and spin again to fill the properly-adjusted SU float bowls.

Install some new spark plugs, ingition contacts/condenser, wires, set the timing static, setup the carbs per initial start, install a fresh battery if needed then ler 'er rip!

George Dill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys!

George, Everything is ready but the timing, I didn't think of that! Do you have a link to a post on how to set the timing for a B18? I did a search and come up with this post!

Herb
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,953 Posts
Thanks guys!

George, Everything is ready but the timing, I didn't think of that! Do you have a link to a post on how to set the timing for a B18? I did a search and come up with this post!

Herb
From: http://www.vclassics.com/archive/ignition.htm
--------------------------------------------------------------
(From Phil Singher) Quick and dirty timing:
I prefer to take the distributor out of the car when changing points and condenser. It's a lot easier to do on the bench, and lets me give the whole unit a good look-over. If you're fortunate enough to have access to a distributor machine (getting hard to find in these days of computerized ignition control), it makes it easy to set the dwell perfectly and check the advance mechanism. Here's how to get the distributor back into the car with the timing already close to right.

Before pulling it out, turn the motor so the rotor is pointing at #1 plug wire (that's the forward-most one). Leave it like that until the distributor goes back in. If that's not possible, turn the motor so #1 piston is at TDC on the compression stroke by lining up the zero mark on the crank pulley with the pointer on the timing gear cover. You can tell it's the compression stroke and not the exhaust stroke because both forward valves will be closed -- look through the oil filler cap and see that the rocker arms are even with each other (if your filler is in the middle of the valve cover, pull the cover off).

The pulley is marked at 10 ATDC, 0 (TDC), 10, 20 and 30 BTDC (some also have 40 BTDC). Turn slightly more until your desired timing mark lines up; in other words, if you want to set basic timing at 15 BTDC, the pointer should be midway between the 10 and 20 marks. Now insert the distributor, seat it fully and hook up the points wire. The rotor will point at #1, but we still need to turn the distributor body to the right angle. Turn it counter-clockwise (looking from the top) until you're sure the points are closed. Switch on the ignition. Turn the distributor clockwise until the points just open -- you'll hear and/or see a spark snap across them. Turn off the ignition and tighten up the distributor enough for starting the car. Put rotor and cap back on.

This will get you within two degrees or so of where you need to be; certainly good enough to start the car and permit it to idle. Of course, you'll need to finish up with a timing light to really get it accurate.
--------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.vclassics.com/contents.htm

http://www.vclassics.com/archive/index.html

http://www.vclassics.com/

George Dill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Update!

I couldn't get the engine to fire. While I was waiting to rebuild the carbs, I found an ad on Craigslist for a B18 for $100. The ad said that it was rebuilt with a new timing gear and performance oil pump. Too good to be true, right? Anyway, turns out the engine was for a "real" GT restored to run the Carrera Panamera. I consider it a "real" GT because it took 4 real GTs to build it! He dropped a B20 in it and this was his back up engine. He had eventually rebuilt a 2nd B20 and had no need for the B18. Long story short, just wanted it gone!

We dropped it in over Christmas but the carbs were bad. So I rebuilt my original and voila!

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,393 Posts
Is this one of Phil Singher's engines? If so, worth MANY eyeteeth! Nice quick start, JUST the way we like'em!
Congratulations!
Where are you?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,953 Posts
I couldn't get the engine to fire. While I was waiting to rebuild the carbs, I found an ad on Craigslist for a B18 for $100. The ad said that it was rebuilt with a new timing gear and performance oil pump. Too good to be true, right? Anyway, turns out the engine was for a "real" GT restored to run the Carrera Panamera. I consider it a "real" GT because it took 4 real GTs to build it! He dropped a B20 in it and this was his back up engine. He had eventually rebuilt a 2nd B20 and had no need for the B18. Long story short, just wanted it gone!

We dropped it in over Christmas but the carbs were bad. So I rebuilt my original and voila!

Nice work, Herb!

Your profile doesn't show an 1800 but the video does - yours?

George Dill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Not sure who built it Walrus 3. I'm in Atlanta, GA. The GT is at Atlanta Motorsports Park. He keeps it in a garage next to a friends, so I hope I'll get to see it soon.

Thanks George! The 1800 is new. I can't tell you about it though, my Wife is reading over my shoulder! It was Kenny Seeleys. He's thinning the heard since he's moving to Austin. Can't get him to part with "Bubbles" the Duett. Oh well, our loss is your gain!

Herb
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top