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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just finished changing out my front wheel bearings. I wanted to do it properly, so I did use a special tool, but I didn't use the Volvo tool. The Volvo tool requires a press for it to work. The one I used does not.

The hubs on our cars are an all-in-one design with the bearing. They are referred in some areas as a generation 2 wheel bearings. You cannot just replace the bearing, you need to replace the entire hub assembly. Furthermore, you cannot just press a new one in and out, you need to apply force in the proper locations to ensure the longevity of the wheel bearing.

There is a lot of talk about the "proper way" to do this job, but, in my opinion, to properly and easily apply that force, you need a special tool. A few companies actually sell the tool you need. They come in different forms. I ended up getting a kit made by Laser Tools (https://www.lasertools.co.uk/product/5568).

Our hubs are 78mm, so make sure you get a tool with the correct size plates.

The tool is actually kinda cool. It's very simple to use and I removed/installed mine in no time. It eliminates all chances of not properly removing, or installing, the hubs. Just make sure you grease the threaded rod of the tool with moly grease each time you use it. If not, you could easily strip it.

For parts I used *** 713 6604 40. This kit comes with the axle bolt, updated splash shields for the new hub, and the hub. I couldn't find a kit from FCP or any other stores that included everything in one.

Here's the procedure to replace both.
1) Jack up the front end of the car.

2) Remove tires, support calipers, remove rotors and axle bolts.

3) Undo the LCA ball joint nut, and separate the LCA from the hub.

4) Push the axle into the hub, and pull the hub outward so that the axle stub is no longer in the hub.

5) Support the axle to the strut spring so that it is not dangling down.

Now it is time for the special tool. The one I used came with good directions and used numbers to show you what part goes where. There are two different sets of plates in the kit. One for removal, and one for installation. The difference is how it applies force to the hub. Use the applicable set.

6) Use the tool to remove the hub. You're going to need a long ratchet with a 22mm socket on it, and a 30mm wrench/socket to couterhold.

You slowly ratchet on the front nut until you see the hub start to come out of the knuckle. It should come straight out with no issue after it begins to move.

Installation

7) Grab the new hub assembly and apply some anti fretting paste to it.

8) Grab the other clamshells and use them to install the new hub.

The new hub will bottom out on the tool when it is fully installed. So you don't have to worry about it being in all the way.

9) Place the proper splash shield on the axle, and then push the axle into the new hub assembly.

The kit comes with two splash shield sizes - one goes on the passenger side axle, while the other goes on the driver side.

10) Place the LCA ball joint into the knuckle, and install the nut.

11) Reinstall the calipers, rotors, and tire.



If anyone wants to rent the tool or that, let me know!
 

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2007 S40 2.4i AW55-50 / 2007 C70 T5 AW55-50
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Wow! Thanks for sharing this write up.

How much did cost you the special tool?
 

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Holy crapola that tool is like $600 US....
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

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I'm wondering if anyone has any input on quality/durability of wheel hub assembly kits out there?

Timken? Beck/Arnley? Moog? Driveworks? Drivestar? Detroit Axle? MasterPro? Precision?

Need to take care of the whirrirrirrirrrrr before my wheels fall off, or I go insane... whichever happens first.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm wondering if anyone has any input on quality/durability of wheel hub assembly kits out there?

Timken? Beck/Arnley? Moog? Driveworks? Drivestar? Detroit Axle? MasterPro? Precision?

Need to take care of the whirrirrirrirrrrr before my wheels fall off, or I go insane... whichever happens first.

Thanks in advance!
I went with ***. Get something of high quality. Timkin or SKF are good.

This isn't a job you want to do again because of an early failure.
 

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I put in two Oreilly Auto MasterPros at ~119k and I'm not at 160k and no issues so far.
 

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Rear wheel bearing does not require any special tools to replace. Just a torx bit to remove the whole hub assembly, held on by four bolts, and a torque wrench to re-install. Note that the torx bit needs to be quite narrow to fit through the access holes in the hub.

Maybe Avenger did front bearings.
 

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I just completed this task using the Volvo Press Tool 9997090 and a 12-ton Harbor Freight press. Once the knuckle was out the tool made quick work of the job, and ensured the bearing pressed in by the race and to the correct depth.

The frustrating part was I had the left-front bearing replaced by a local VIP shop 16 months/13,000 mile go and it had already failed. Turns out they pressed the new hub/bearing assembly in by the hub (not by the bearing race), which is a no-no. The no-name bearing was of dubious quality compared to the *** bearing I purchased to replace it. I purchased the bearing, a bearing brace kit, the half-shaft "mud guard" and the tool for less money than I was charged for the botched job. At least the knuckle came out pretty easy.

Amazing how smooth and quiet my S40 now is. In a few months I'm going to replace the right side (even though it seems OK) and install the brace and mud guard. Hopefully that will be the end of the wheel bearing headaches.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I just completed this task using the Volvo Press Tool 9997090 and a 12-ton Harbor Freight press. Once the knuckle was out the tool made quick work of the job, and ensured the bearing pressed in by the race and to the correct depth.

The frustrating part was I had the left-front bearing replaced by a local VIP shop 16 months/13,000 mile go and it had already failed. Turns out they pressed the new hub/bearing assembly in by the hub (not by the bearing race), which is a no-no. The no-name bearing was of dubious quality compared to the *** bearing I purchased to replace it. I purchased the bearing, a bearing brace kit, the half-shaft "mud guard" and the tool for less money than I was charged for the botched job. At least the knuckle came out pretty easy.

Amazing how smooth and quiet my S40 now is. In a few months I'm going to replace the right side (even though it seems OK) and install the brace and mud guard. Hopefully that will be the end of the wheel bearing headaches.
That's great! I tried to use Volvo 9997090, but I ordered the wrong part and only bought the giant tub the bearing get pressed into. It didn't come with the clamshell to actually press the bearing in with. So, that's why I went the other tool route.

And that's great you had success! It makes a difference to just do the job right the first time, and I'm glad you fixed what your local repair shop couldn't do right. The new bearings definitely make a difference.
 

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Just another note: I failed to fully seat the ABS connector when I replaced the wheel bearing and after about 80 miles of driving my ABS Christmas Tree warning lights came on. I pulled the wheel and sure enough the connector was loose. I cleaned the contacts with rubbing alcohol on a Q-Tip, fully seated it, yanked on it a few times to make sure it was locked in and now all is good.
 

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I just replaced both Front wheel bearings on my S40, very easy. I didn't use any special tools (even tough we have loads of them >.>) but did use a 40t press
 

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I just replaced both Front wheel bearings on my S40, very easy. I didn't use any special tools (even tough we have loads of them >.>) but did use a 40t press
Then you probably didn't do it the proper way it will probably fail sooner. You have to press it in by the outer race otherwise you transmit all the force through the ball bearings.
 

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Still willing to rent/loan the Laser Bearing Tool?

Sorry to revive a slowly-aging thread, but I'm in need of replacing my V50's front bearings and was looking at the Laser tool. When I googled to find a lower price, this thread came up. So, I finally stopped lurking on the forum and joined, but don't yet have PM privileges...


If you want to reach me, my email is "caseyvile at gmail".

Thanks!
Casey
 

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Sorry to revive a slowly-aging thread, but I'm in need of replacing my V50's front bearings and was looking at the Laser tool. When I googled to find a lower price, this thread came up. So, I finally stopped lurking on the forum and joined, but don't yet have PM privileges...


If you want to reach me, my email is "caseyvile at gmail".

Thanks!
Casey
What do you want/need to know, Casey?
 

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I spent about 2 days worth of time on google looking for this tool. Sealey and Laser are the two manufacturers I have found that make that tool. Google terms 78mm and Gen2 bearing kit etc.

Cheapest I found was 80 GBP but they didn't respond to my inquiry about them shipping internationally. Otherwise, between the USA, UK and various european countries, $300 is the minimum cost to get one of these tools.

I have a volvo independent shop about a half hour from where I work (Baker Auto/Volvo Specialists) that will do an hour of labor for both bearings in new knuckles. Reasonably, $125/hr to do it at a shop that should have the tool or the knowledge of how to do it easily, can't compare to the $300 to get the tool.

There is a rental tool that one can use to PULL the bearings (you can try a 5 ton 3 jaw puller with the axle still in and it does a fair job) but the clamshell kit will also do the same job - won't install the bearing due to it's design tho.
 
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