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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well I got a huge nail in my tire today. According to the stealer there is 4/32 tread left on the stock tires (which is plenty). However, since the nail is so close to the sidewall of the tire, it's too dangerous to plug and it's highly probable that the plug won't hold. Now I'm stuck buying new tires at $250 a pop. <p>I need your suggestions.... New Tires, plug the hole, or leave the nail in? Please help me out!
 

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Re: Flippin Construction Nails (UNO_RACING)

4/32 is not "a lot" of tread left, perhaps 3 to 4000 miles TOPS so now would be a good time to get a GOOD <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/eek.gif" BORDER="0"> tire on there
 

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Re: Flippin Construction Nails (steamboatsig)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>steamboatsig</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">You can try a patch from the inside of the tire. </TD></TR></TABLE><p>True, I always heard that you NEVER want to PLUG a RADIAL tire. The belts, as they move, will slice through the plug. Patched from the inside is the way to go.
 

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Re: Flippin Construction Nails (JRL)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>JRL</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">4/32 is not "a lot" of tread left, perhaps 3 to 4000 miles TOPS so now would be a good time to get a GOOD <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/eek.gif" BORDER="0"> tire on there</TD></TR></TABLE><p><br>There is so much information on the tires on this site. The F1s are too expensive and so are the PS2s.
 

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Re: Flippin Construction Nails (Quick Brick)

I had a slice in one of my tire's sidewall when I drove an S-10 Blazer in high school. I didn't want to tell my parents because I was offroading so my uncle put a patch inside it and then put an intertube inside the tire. Lol. It worked.
 

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Re: Flippin Construction Nails (UNO_RACING)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>UNO_RACING</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">since the nail is so close to the sidewall of the tire, it's too dangerous to plug and it's highly probable that the plug won't hold. </TD></TR></TABLE><p>Agree. The "corner" of the tread will push any plug right out as it flexes, and won't hold air. The lower pressure could lead to catastrophic failure.<p>4/32 is actually very little left - I'd go for new tires.<p>Tom.
 

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Re: Flippin Construction Nails (UNO_RACING)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>UNO_RACING</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">There is so much information on the tires on this site. The F1s are too expensive and so are the PS2s. </TD></TR></TABLE><p>So go Kumho. Seriously, if you want cheap tire replacement, don't use 18's.
 

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Re: Flippin Construction Nails (UNO_RACING)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>UNO_RACING</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote"><p><br>There is so much information on the tires on this site. The F1s are too expensive and so are the PS2s. </TD></TR></TABLE><br>Let's see. You spend upwards to 40 large to buy the car but you want to buy the cheapest tire out there?<br>You're going to be penny wise and pound foolish?
 

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Re: Flippin Construction Nails (JRL)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>JRL</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote"><br>Let's see. You spend upwards to 40 large to buy the car but you want to buy the cheapest tire out there?<br>You're going to be penny wise and pound foolish?</TD></TR></TABLE><p>Yeah....what he said. <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/tongue.gif" BORDER="0">
 

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Re: Flippin Construction Nails (Quick Brick)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>Quick Brick</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote"><p>True, I always heard that you NEVER want to PLUG a RADIAL tire. The belts, as they move, will slice through the plug. Patched from the inside is the way to go.</TD></TR></TABLE><p>I've personally plugged radials and gotten another 15-20k miles out of the tire, w/o any kind of slow leak. A patch is better, but a plug will work, and it doesn't require the tire be dis-mounted.<p>And, I agree w/ JRL, 4/32 is only 40% of the original tread depth. There might be another couple thousand miles in them, but at this point, I'd bite the bullet and get new ones.
 

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Reminds me of that night I went to a friend's movie opening party and parked in a construction area and got four flats in my front passenger tire and one in the read one. The rear was less than 6 months old and the front, just 1 or 2.<p>Not like this is any consolation. <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/biggrin.gif" BORDER="0"> <BR><BR>
<i>Modified by Razor1973 at 5:17 PM 5-4-2006</i>
 

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Re: Flippin Construction Nails (UNO_RACING)

LONG<p>Here is the truth:<p>Tires can be repaired to a large extend including near side wall and even side wall (Yes, go ahead and scream). The properly repaired tires have been tested by the government and they exceeded the new tire in tests according to the tire repair company.<p>Now the question is why the general misconception (you can only read this thread to see)?<p>The problem is like with everything else in life, who is doing the repair, what method and who manufactured the materials. As you can see there are allready plenty of variables in this and because US is the country that it is when it comes to litigation, few business will fix your tire if puncture is not in the center of the thread.<p>For fixing the tires I used high quality materials have the proper tools and have done the work myself to be sure that is done properly. Here is a description for thread punctures patching, including shoulder:<p>Tools:<br>1. special bit to drill the puncture. It is nothing that you have seen: looks like a torure tool from a SF movie<br>2. scrapper tool to remove the superficial layer inside the tire around the puncture<br>3. wheel tool to press the patch inside the tire<br>4. a probe to determine the extent and the orientation of the puncture<br>5. sand paper 110 grit<br>6. pliers to pull the plug<p>Materials:<br>1. Special Plug - looks like a mushroom with a long steam and flat hat; the hat is 2" in diameter. The steam ends with a wire. The base of the steam and the underside of the hat are covered with a special material and protected by plastic foil until installation. They are made in England. You have to have the proper size depending on the size of the puncture.<br>2. Rubomatic tire compound (kind of vulcanizing glue)<br>3. Special cleaning fluid (softens if not dissolving rubber)<br>4. rugs<p>Procedure:<br>1. Clean the tire if it is dirty<br>2. Remove the tire from the wheel (you need to go to a tire shop)<br>3. Gently remove the foreign object form the hole<br>4. Use the probe to determine the extent of the damage and see if you have the proper patch on hand<br>5. Use the scrapper to clean the inside of the tire one inch larger than the space required by the mushroom hat. TIP: works much faster and easier by softening the tire using the cleaning fluid.<br>6. Buff the area using a rotary buffer at low speed. If you do not have it you can do it by hand<br>7. Use the probe to determine the angle of the puncture. Many times it is not at a right angle.<br>8. Use the bit with a high speed drill (a good one would be at 2500 rpm) to drill the puncture. Be CAREFUL to do it in the same direction the puncture is. This will make a big hole in your tire! Don’t' worry that is good. The reason is that your tire has steel cords and if you do not cut them by drilling they will sooner or latter cut your plug and you can have an tire explosion (friends of mine learn that the hard way on motorcycles). Besides the string being cut by the cords there is the problem of water getting to the cords and rusting them. Do the drilling at least 3 times from outside and three times form inside. Don't even think of doing this using a regular bit.<br>9. Now clean the are where the patch hat will sit with the cleaning fluid<br>10. Let is dry (it dries very quick)<br>11. Use the rubomatic fluid and brush it on the entire cleaned up inner surface.<br>12 Use the rubomatic fluid and a screw driver (if you do not have the special probing/ramming device to do this; I don't have it) and rub the fluid on the hole walls really well.<br>13. Let is completely dry. This may take 30 minutes.<br>14. This is the trickiest part of the repair and you have to get it right the first time. You want to get the plug fully in (the hat to make full contact with the inner tire) but the plug is larger than the hole. TIP: remember to drill at least 3 times from both sides. Get your pliers ready. Remove the protecting plastic foil from the stem base and the hat underside. DO NOT allow this parts to contact the tire at this time because they will stick forever. Apply a good amount of rubomatic fluid only on the first half of the steam, not on the hat or on the stem base, just a bit over the first part of the special material on the stem. This also helps with lubrication when you pull the plug. Carefully insert the stem in the hole from INSIDE starting with its leading wire tip until the special material on the steam comes in contact with the tire. At this point the stem wire is outside the tire and you can grab it with the pliers. Grab it and using a determined and clean motion pull it all the way out. DO NOT try to push it from inside. That will only make the hat made contact with the tire prematurely and will prevent it form properly seating itself. You should pull hard; don't worry the steam will extend (it is rubber after all) but you can't possibly do anything wrong by pulling hard. It will not come out, don't worry. At this point the hat should be properly seated making contact with the tire.<br>15. Use the wheel tool to roll it over the hat ensuring especially the edges are properly sealed to the tire.<br>16. Use an utility knife to cut the stem so only 3mm (1/8") remains above the tire thread. Yes you should leave it sticking out of the tire thread. It will wear out flush with the thread while you driving around.<p>That is all. It took more to write it than it takes to do it. Besides the 30 min wait for the fluid to dry out everything else (not counting the tire washing and removal here) takes less than 30 minutes.<p>I don't think you will find a tire shop that will fix you r tire this way even if the puncture is in the middle of the thread. I haven't found one around here.<p>Most of them are using the "string" method. It is a string soaked in rubber material that is forced inside the puncture with a tool and left there (sometimes glue is applied on the string) to vulcanize itself and bond with the tire. Biggest problem with that are the steel cords as I described it above. You can buy this kind of fix from your local auto parts store or you supper market and your gas station shop. They are intended for TEMPORARY repair so you can get home. Many motorcyclists are carrying this kits with them.<p>An alternative to the string is the rubber plug gun. It is a tool that inserts special plugs through the puncture from outside. They look like little mushrooms and once the hat is squeezed through the tire thread they remain there hold by their hats. They are also intended as temporary fix and many motorcyclist found out that they may be cut by the cords before reaching home (as you can guess I own a motorcycle).<p>Some of tire shops are adding to this repair an inside patch. It is a huge improvement over the string and plug but not as good as the method that I use.<p>I patched my Rossos when they were almost worn out (fall last year). The tire shops don't even touch a job like that on the solder. I've done spirited driving and family trips on them for an other 3000 miles until I switched to winter wheels. I loved the grip with almost no thread on them ... while was not raining.<p>I had one repair done a few years ago at the tire shop (big chain) and they used string. When I objected they said that they always do that and never had any problems. Since then I do my own fixes, and I have unfortunately many to do with all construction work going on for the last 3 years on the streets to work. I wander how long before the new Michelins will get a nail.<br><BR><BR>
<i>Modified by doru at 2:32 PM 5-4-2006</i>
 

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Re: Flippin Construction Nails (doru)

Razor....Please tell me how you got 4 flats in ONE front tire? <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/wink.gif" BORDER="0">
 

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Re: Flippin Construction Nails (MASH)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>MASH</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">Razor....Please tell me how you got 4 flats in ONE front tire? <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/wink.gif" BORDER="0"> </TD></TR></TABLE><p>I parked. <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/confused.gif" BORDER="0"> <p>Oh, and it's not like they were all around the same area. Noooo... They were all around the friggin' 1 month old tire, which <A HREF="http://forums.swedespeed.com/zerothread?id=47083" TARGET="_blank">I had just replaced</A> (and paid $275 for) since I had broken its strings when I hit a relatively small puddle the month before. Bad luck, I tell you. Also the reason <A HREF="http://forums.swedespeed.com/zerothread?id=5820" TARGET="_blank">I am not very happy with my suspension</A>.
 

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Re: Flippin Construction Nails (JRL)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>JRL</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote"><br>Let's see. You spend upwards to 40 large to buy the car but you want to buy the cheapest tire out there?<br>You're going to be penny wise and pound foolish?</TD></TR></TABLE><br>Well said JRL. Another applicable saying: "If you want to play, you got'a pay!"<p>UNO_RACING: Nails in the tire suck! Luckily I escaped with only one in 18 months (in my XC90's winter tire) and now most of the contrsution in my 'hood is finally done. I feel for you buddy, staring a big tire bill in the face ain't much fun.<p>I beleive the best repair method uses a patch with a plug attached to it. They reem out the hole a bit to make sure the steel belts are out'a the way and then pull the plug through from the outside with a thing that looks like an oversized seweing needle, and of course it's all covered in some nice vulcanizing 'glue'. The plug and patch bond with the tire at a molecular level (google 'vulcanizing').<p>If it's close to the sidewall and/or if you plan on lots of high speed driving just get new tires now or at the very least put the patched one on the rear. Keep two of the old ones for just in case.<p>Might be good to see what Perelli has to saw about patching the Rosso's. Speaking of Rosso's there are lots for sale from your fello R owners (I don't suppsed you live in Canada?)<p>LTA<br>
 
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