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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
This is my first post, and was kinda hoping to gather up a ton of information on my first new car. Let me give you some history:

1986 240DL Wagon
116,000 miles on body (engine replaced by an excellent mechanic also has about the same miles)
5 spd transmission
dark blue vinyl seats
no power windows
"heated" seats (dont think they work)
good heater
new tires, radiator, clutch, throw out bearing, seals all around, timing belt and fluids.

I absolutely loved this car, and thought it was a good price (3000 total including reg/taxes/etc.)

But here are my questions:

I am learning to drive manual on this car... do you think it should be hard?
Are there any special designations (ie 245 = wagon??... i dont know)
What kind of brakes (abs/disc etc.) does it have?
The engine... I know nothing about what it would be, cylinders/valves/hp/torque etc.
Its a funny blue, I call it smurf blue... what is the real name of this color?
Is the paint clear coated? Can I wax it/polish it?
Are there manuals for self-repairs out there (like bently or haynes for VW's?)

Sorry for all the questions... but its such a nice car, very nice condition and its my first car! I wanna know everything about it!
 

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quote:

Originally posted by jrocheunh:
I am learning to drive manual on this car... do you think it should be hard?
No it is not hard. Volvos are very forgiving when it comes to learning to shift.

quote:

Originally posted by jrocheunh:
Are there any special designations (ie 245 = wagon??... i dont know)
The old numbering system goes like this:

First number is the series. There is a 2, 7, 9, and 8 in the US. There also were 3 and 4 in Europe.

Second number (most of the time) is the number of cylinders. Volvo makes 4, 5, and 6 cylinder engines. Some of the time the 6 is used as the nicer version but still has the 4 cylinder engine. You also could just leave this part out by using zeros to hold the place. ie. 200 series.

Thrid number is the number of doors. 2, 4 and 5 doors are the options here. 5 doors means wagon since the rear liftgate is considered a door. (I've used it as a door)
Since all the cars shared most of the parts you also can use the number 0 here too. By puting a zero you are saying is applys to all cars in that series with that engine. ie 240 means all four cylinder 200 series cars.

quote:

Originally posted by jrocheunh:
What kind of brakes (abs/disc etc.) does it have?
Power-assisted four-wheel disc brakes.

quote:

Originally posted by jrocheunh:
The engine... I know nothing about what it would be, cylinders/valves/hp/torque etc.
In-line, four-cylinder, B230F gas engine with single overhead camshaft, breakless electronic ignition system with computer-controlled spark advance, electronic fuel injection and Lambda Sond® emission control.

Horsepower, SAE net:114 @ 5400 rpm

Torque, ft./lbs., SAE net:136 @ 2750 rpm

Compression Ratio 9.8:1

quote:

Originally posted by jrocheunh:
Its a funny blue, I call it smurf blue... what is the real name of this color?
I don't know. There was dark blue, medium blue, blue, and blue/green that year. As for the acutall name I don't know but you can find out by looking on the ID plate under the hood for the color code - then going here.


quote:

Originally posted by jrocheunh:
Are there manuals for self-repairs out there (like bently or haynes for VW's?)
Yes, there are both Haynes and Bently.
 

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Great info so far.

quote:

Originally posted by jrocheunh:
"heated" seats (dont think they work)
Check the connections at the switches, and check under the seats for another connection. The one under the seat is a white plastic plug on either end of the wires with bullet connectors. These get unplugged when the seats are removed, so that's one possible reason why they don't work. Check the fuse too.

quote:

I am learning to drive manual on this car... do you think it should be hard?
No, not really. I learned to drive and learned to drive a standard trans all at the same time on my '87 240. The 5 speed transmission is not as strong as the older 4spd+OD, but I abused mine quite a bit during the first couple of months and it shows no affects 20,000 miles later (although I would recommend that you try not to abuse it). Just try to work on pushing the clutch pedal to the floor for each shift, and don't go too fast. Most of the times when I'd grind gears going into 2nd or 3rd it would be because I was trying to shift too fast and I just wasn't used to it yet. Also be careful about accelerating quickly while turning, especially on a wet road because it's not difficult to make the rear end slide.

After a couple of months of driving, consider changing the transmissin fluid to a synthetic, like Redline MTL or Amsoil Supershift trans fluid. Also try to overfill the transmission because there is a known lubrication problem with the M47 5-spd. I think it calls for 1.6 quarts, but try to get close to 2 quarts in by raising one side of the car.

quote:

What kind of brakes (abs/disc etc.) does it have?
4-wheel disc, no ABS, and the front calipers are Girling and the rear are ATE. The front rotors are also vented.

quote:

The engine... I know nothing about what it would be, cylinders/valves/hp/torque etc.
4 cylinders, 8 valves, and the engine is a non-interference design, meaning that if the timing belt breaks, the valves will not hit the pistons and no serious damage will be done. The engine also holds 4 quarts of oil, and you should use Mann oil filters. OEM Volvo filters are made by Mann, so it's much cheaper to buy them w/o the Volvo name and markup. Cases of 10 are usually for sale on ebay, like this auction.

quote:

Is the paint clear coated? Can I wax it/polish it?
If the paint is metallic, it is clear coated. If not, then it probably isn't. I have a white '87 240 and it doesn't have clear coat. You can wax it, but if you do have clear coat, be careful with certain products like adhesive removers, which may damage the clear coat.

quote:

Are there manuals for self-repairs out there (like bently or haynes for VW's?)
The Haynes manual is a good guide and worth buying. The Bentley manual is more detailed than the Haynes, it covers more advanced repairs, and it has wiring diagrams. You can get a good price on ebay for a Bentley manual, or try amazon.com.
 

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I own the "1986 245" car on the brickboard that you saw. We have pretty much the same car, except you have the M47 transmission and I have the M46.
I like to call the color "Volvo blue" however I can only assume that the official name is medium blue. I think it's the best color for 245s. White and Red are close runners-up.
The transmissions on these cars are really nice to drive I've found. Easier than my Saab 900. You should pick it up pretty quickly. Good luck with the car!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
hi acd,
yes i must agree i love our "volvo blue", only color i like as good is the deep red/maroon. Also, i realize i made a mistake, seeing as my transmission is not a 5spd. but rather a 4 speed w/ overdrive... is this still considered an M47 transmission?

I have spent so many hours researching volvos today that I cant wait to pick this car up! I already know my first 3 mods... adding my UNH Hockey and R.E.M. stickers, as well as getting a new set of the replica hubcaps to freshen the car up - (2 hubcaps have a little part broken off... i cant describe it)
 

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quote:

Originally posted by jrocheunh:
...my transmission is not a 5spd. but rather a 4 speed w/ overdrive... is this still considered an M47 transmission?
The 4spd+OD trans in the '86 240 is an M46, which is a much stronger transmission than the M47. The true 5 speed, officially the M47-II, was used in the 240 from 1987 to the end of production in 1993. The M46 is great because it will practically go forever behind a non-turbo engine. However, it has more parts that can fail due to the OD. The overdrive unit, the relay, the switch, the wiring, and the solenoid can all cause problems with shifting into and out of the overdrive gear.

And one other thing. When shifting to overdrive, you should push the clutch pedal down, then engage overdrive and release the clutch.
 

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quote:

Originally posted by towerymt:
And one other thing. When shifting to overdrive, you should push the clutch pedal down, then engage overdrive and release the clutch.
Never did that myself. I don't think that anyone driving our old 1983 244 DL or 1984 245 GL ever used the clutch when engaging OD. About 16 years on the '83 and about 17 years on the '84, no problems that I know of.

Would it be to just help smooth the OD engaging, or could there be problems associated with it?
 

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There's some part of the OD that will wear more if the clutch isn't used, I think. It's been a while since I've seen it discussed at the brickboard, so I can't remember what it was. A search of the archives turned up nothing.
 

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quote:

Originally posted by idale:
Would it be to just help smooth the OD engaging, or could there be problems associated with it?
It makes it smoother (as smooth as your shifting, that could vary) and therefore less wear on the trans and OD. I never did though since it was knid of sketchy when it would engage if it would that day. I mostly drove in 4th anyway because of all the hills.
 

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My 240 booklet says nothing about engaging the clutch before shifting into OD, but I do it too. Psychological for me.

Oh yeah, just go to your nearest boneyard for the wheelcovers. You should get a set for like $25, and they'll be OEM rather than the replicas (which stick out like sore thumbs!)
 

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If you can check your paint code...

108=Sapphire Blue
121=Aleutian Blue/Medium Blue
124=Volvo Blue

and there are others...

I always use the clutch when I switch the OD on/off. It smooths things out, and I can't imagine that an abrupt, no-clutch engagement would be beneficial. But that's probably the difference between an OD lasting 300K and 400K miles.
 
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