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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Been driving the old wagon a little more a few 100 mile round trips. The overdrive is probably the biggest improvement. Expecially in a 220 with the 4.56 rear gears. 65 mph is much less noisy.
The old B18 was actually in great shape but it seems I've got a little more peep now. No real way to back that up with facts and figures. But 200 CCs and the duel exit exhaust manifold seems to have added some power.
The cam is a used C cam at the time I stupidity thought if the cam goes bad I can just slap in a new one. Of course when I started to put the head on I realized you have to pull the stupid head to change lifters.
Hopefully that old cam will last forever. . .

About 500 miles on it so far and I'm still getting the smell of burnt oil in the exhaust. (15-40 Rotella) Haven't had to add any yet and new seals on the tail gate would probably keep the fumes outside.

One thing did change however. The engine likes to run on after the keys shut off. That seemed strange because the SUs were used on the old motor and that one idled high due to the bushings being drilled all the way through.
So I pushed the bushings in and filed them to fit the bores. It idles at a reasonable rate now I can go down our crowded main street without having to push the clutch in in first gear to slow down. :)

So after racking my brain I clamped the off PVC hose and it shuts right off. (old B18 had a breather tube)

Brings to mind two questions. One is the PVC valve was just on the B20 it could for a 454 Chevy for all I know.

The other is. Wiith the rings not fully seated yet, maybe the fumes have a lower resistance to self ignition than the gasoline. (like octane rating) And the crankcase byproducts are what's lighting the fire ?

The later seems plausible but a further test would be clamping the PVC, turning the idle up the 50 ish RPMs and seeing how it shuts down hot.
 

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The other is. Wiith the rings not fully seated yet, maybe the fumes have a lower resistance to self ignition than the gasoline. (like octane rating) And the crankcase byproducts are what's lighting the fire ?

The later seems plausible but a further test would be clamping the PVC, turning the idle up the 50 ish RPMs and seeing how it shuts down hot.
Auto-ignition is usually caused by carbon deposits. I know, new engine. I had (and still have) the same issue with my B20. It is running way too rich at idle, even though at normal load it is running a bit lean. My problem is that I have the needles for the B18 in the SU's, so I cannot adjust the SU's for proper idle mixture AND proper mixture under driving. I tolerate the lean running, and I get a bit of gas mileage benefit. When I want full power out of the engine, I often have to pull the choke (especially in cold days). Also, my run-in disappears if I go on a longish drive in the country, which tends to clean up the sparkplugs and heads/pistons. Once I do a bit of city driving, it comes back. I am also running 89 octane, and have adjusted the timing accordingly. With 93 there may be less issue.

By the way, a well built B20 with the 4.56 should give you good acceleration. The 4.56 could allow you a bigger cam, as loss in low end torque is less important (unless you carry heavy loads on steep hills). I think my B20 is "built-up" (do not know the history), and when I get on it with the right mixture, it does move well. And I have the 4.1.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've been running the "high" octane gas 92. I was hoping it was the left over 87 stuff causing the run on but that's flushed out now. When I get home I'm going to play around with it some more.

Other than the run on though it's running great. The car itself needs a lot more work, like paint, weather stripping and a new interior. But that crap's overrated.
 

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FWIW With the right (hook) tool, lifters will come out through their bores in the head, allowing you to change cam, gears and replace lifters without pulling head, just radiator.

Different versions of PCV setup over the years, with different ingredients..Make sure you've got the right piecesparts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The lifters will fit through the head? Looked like the holes were too small to me. Hopefully I wouldn't have to find out.

Yeah I just reused the PVC that was on the B20 in the 67 parts wagon. Could be all wrong.

I've seen two different drawings. One with the PVC valve in the oil cap and fresh air going in the side of the block and one the other way around. PVC valve in the side of the block and fresh air into the oil cap. That's how this one was so I just hooked it up that way.

I can't imagine either way would change much but it would be easy enough to find out.
 

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Technically speaking, you really don't have to pull the lifters at all, you just need to raise them about a half-inch. Problem of course being there are 8 of them, so you need 8 hooks. But they're not really to hard to make. I've also used magnets. The main problem is that sometimes the lifters will get a small lip around the bottom, which hangs up in the bore. Usually though, at that point it's high enough the clear the camshaft journal/lobes and the cam will slide right out with just a little bit of careful rotation.
 

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Of course you're right, the holes are too small to allow removal of the lifters, and you're right too that the lifters only need rise enough to clear the cam lobes. I can't remember my memory being this bad.
Still planning to stop by, Global Moderator, or did we nail that down already?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If the C cam in there goes bad and it probably wouldn't as much I drive the car.
But if it does I would be changing the cam and lifters. Putting a new cam used lifters seems like a good way to do another cam swap doesn't it ? :)

But of course it could be done.
 

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bobbyz is correct, in that it is always recommended to use new lifters with a new camshaft. Because the lifters develop a subtle wear pattern based on the cam lobes, and if you change that match-up with a new or different cam...there will be accelerated wear and fine metal removal on both surfaces until they settle in to a new wear pattern with each other. That doesn't mean people don't do it...but I have seen a number of premature camshaft lobe failures when the correct procedure wasn't followed.
 
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