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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Volvo is making progress but unfortunately they have no window on EVs.

Germans are bringing hordes of EVs to market.

Mercedes will have fully electric E and S class.

Audi will bring electric SUVs.

BMW already has i3 and some others are in the pipeline.

Does Volvo has fully electric plans??

What do you think??

I imagine new S90 with a fully electric drivetrain would be a joy:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I beg to differ.

Market is readier than ever.

If not so Germans wouldn't be bringing all these stuff.

Model 3 is just around the corner.

I think electric cars are more viable in upper class models.

S60 EV wouldn't make huge sense but S90 would be a dream.
 

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An EV makes no sense to me until they can get AT LEAST 1000 miles on a charge while being driven 70+mph.
 

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An EV makes no sense to me until they can get AT LEAST 1000 miles on a charge while being driven 70+mph.
1000 miles?!? Hello Capt unrealistic. Look at all the gas cars with 1,000 mile ranges, oh wait there are none. You obviously have something against EV's or have zero experience with them. A 300 mile EV isn't even necessary. My Volvo on a full tank gets about 300 miles and I fill up once a week at most. As someone who has driven over 20,000 miles in EV's, with many long distance trips, you statement is exactly the one put out by automakers who are scared of change.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
An EV makes no sense to me until they can get AT LEAST 1000 miles on a charge while being driven 70+mph.
That is ambitious.

1000 miles with single tank/charge.

You would manage this with only diesels and with a big tank.

400 miles and a full charge in 2 hours would be nice.

S90 would manage that since it will be a big car and so much space for battery underneath.
 

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If Volvo wants to build an EV, the S90 is not the car. A proper EV needs to be built from the ground up, not modified from an existing chassis. You need to make the battery as low as possible. Working around existing structures that are unnecessary, like transmission tunnels, makes zero sense. There is a reason that BMW followed the Tesla lead with the i range and not the Leaf way of doing things.
 

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If not so Germans wouldn't be bringing all these stuff.
The Germans build things mostly to compete against each other for market share. How else do you explain vehicles like the GLE Coupe being built to go up against the X6? They can't stand to not compete no matter how small the market niche. It's an ego thing as much as it is a business thing.

That being said, all the major players will be offering a suite of powertrain options for the foreseeable future: diesel, gasoline plug in electric hybrids, gasoline range extending battery electric vehicles, pure battery electric vehicles, LPG, CNG, hydrogen ICE, hydrogen electric fuel cell, etc. No one can afford to waste and the proper powertrain selection will depend on the specific application.
 

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1000 miles?!? Hello Capt unrealistic. Look at all the gas cars with 1,000 mile ranges, oh wait there are none. You obviously have something against EV's or have zero experience with them. A 300 mile EV isn't even necessary. My Volvo on a full tank gets about 300 miles and I fill up once a week at most. As someone who has driven over 20,000 miles in EV's, with many long distance trips, you statement is exactly the one put out by automakers who are scared of change.
My problem is that I take LOTS of long trips (I drive 30-40,000 per year). I just returned from a 1,000 mile weekend trip. This is a non issue in my gasoline powered Volvo because it takes all of 5 minutes to fill. But this would create a problem with an electric vehicle. For me, having to spend several HOURS recharging every few hundred miles is wildly impractical.
 

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My problem is that I take LOTS of long trips (I drive 30-40,000 per year). I just returned from a 1,000 mile weekend trip. This is a non issue in my gasoline powered Volvo because it takes all of 5 minutes to fill. But this would create a problem with an electric vehicle. For me, having to spend several HOURS recharging every few hundred miles is wildly impractical.
Okay, so you just aren't familiar with today's technology. Let me introduce you to something called DC quick charging. Using Direct Current, Tesla's Model S can charge at a rate of 340miles/hr plugged in to a Supercharger(http://www.teslamotors.com/supercharger). So your idea of spending HOURS charging every few hundred miles is nothing more than a fallacy.

Here's the thing though, you are a fringe case. The average American drives 30 miles/day. They charge their cars at home while they sleep and never even think about it. You shouldn't even really be driving a gas car. Diesel makes the most sense based on the crazy mileage you are putting on.
 

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Okay, so you just aren't familiar with today's technology. Let me introduce you to something called DC quick charging. Using Direct Current, Tesla's Model S can charge at a rate of 340miles/hr plugged in to a Supercharger(http://www.teslamotors.com/supercharger). So your idea of spending HOURS charging every few hundred miles is nothing more than a fallacy.
Okay, let's assume for the sake of argument that my Volvo goes 340 miles on a tank of gas. It may take roughly 5 minutes to fill up versus one hourfor a Tesla traveling the same distance. This means that the Tesla takes twelve timeslonger to "fill up" so to speak. WAY too much time if you're driving from Richmond, VA to Atlanta, GA in a single day, which is a realistic trip for me.
 

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Here's the thing though, you are a fringe case.
We're getting a little personal here, just because someone disagrees with us, aren't we?
 

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Okay, let's assume for the sake of argument that my Volvo goes 340 miles on a tank of gas. It may take roughly 5 minutes to fill up versus one hourfor a Tesla traveling the same distance. This means that the Tesla takes twelve timeslonger to "fill up" so to speak. WAY too much time if you're driving from Richmond, VA to Atlanta, GA in a single day, which is a realistic trip for me.
You ignored the second part of my comment. You are a fringe case and do not speak for the market. EV's don't need to work for 100% of the market to be viable, just like gas or diesel or any other type of propulsion currently on the market. If you drove a diesel, you would be making half the stops you do in your gas car too.

We're getting a little personal here, just because someone disagrees with us, aren't we?
Wasn't meaning to offend, just stating the facts.
 

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I wouldn't count on Volvo to build EV, which will be competing on range and less body weight. It contradicts with philosophy of safe cars. And it is all about battery technology which Volvo doesn't have any secret recipe.
 

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The Volvo SPA (and the CMA) platforms have been designed from the outset with hybrid and EV versions in mind e.g. the central 'back bone' installation of the batteries in the SPA cars.

Volvo previously and has recently re-iterated that every model will get a hybrid version. Consider both mild and plug in hybrids possible.

EV versions also possible already, as and when the market is worth being involved in.

C30 Electric was their first production EV. Two versions I believe, the latter a collaboration with Siemens. However, limited sales or leasing really to companies or government utilities in Sweden, Germany and Beijing.

This required some bespoke modifications to the C30 not envisioned when it began to be designed in 2001 (launched 2006).
 

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I read about a battery quick change system in Denmark -- pull into the station, depleted batteries out, charged batteries in, 5 minutes. Depleted batteries are charged in rotation. A hundred of those could cover most of the country if the vehicle had a 300-400 mile range.

I remember reading a story about an early automobile cross country trip. They had to stop at each town and often go into the grocery store/pharmacy to get their gasoline -- sometimes in quart bottles -- because the "service station" infrastructure didn't exist. I also remember when the US Government mandated that "service stations" had to sell Diesel -- supporting the automotive consumer who otherwise had to go to truck stops or gas stations near major highways to get their Diesel.
 

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I read about a battery quick change system in Denmark -- pull into the station, depleted batteries out, charged batteries in, 5 minutes. Depleted batteries are charged in rotation. A hundred of those could cover most of the country if the vehicle had a 300-400 mile range.

I remember reading a story about an early automobile cross country trip. They had to stop at each town and often go into the grocery store/pharmacy to get their gasoline -- sometimes in quart bottles -- because the "service station" infrastructure didn't exist. I also remember when the US Government mandated that "service stations" had to sell Diesel -- supporting the automotive consumer who otherwise had to go to truck stops or gas stations near major highways to get their Diesel.
Better Place was the company that was implementing the quick change stations and they went Bankrupt in 2013. Tesla built battery quick change ability into Model S. They did a pilot program in Southern CA and basically found that no one used it, they all just used the Superchargers so they decided to abandon it as well.
 

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I read about a battery quick change system in Denmark -- pull into the station, depleted batteries out, charged batteries in, 5 minutes. Depleted batteries are charged in rotation. A hundred of those could cover most of the country if the vehicle had a 300-400 mile range.

I remember reading a story about an early automobile cross country trip. They had to stop at each town and often go into the grocery store/pharmacy to get their gasoline -- sometimes in quart bottles -- because the "service station" infrastructure didn't exist. I also remember when the US Government mandated that "service stations" had to sell Diesel -- supporting the automotive consumer who otherwise had to go to truck stops or gas stations near major highways to get their Diesel.
NOT saying that EV Volvos are a "bad" idea. Just wildly impractical for me (and I strongly suspect a lot of other folks) with the current state of affairs. Guess I'll take a wait / see.
 
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