SwedeSpeed - Volvo Performance Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
I did the first oil change on my 2009 S80 T6 last week. It was a learning process for me, but thanks to previous posters, I knew what to do (or thought I did). I call it a "DIY Oil Change With A Twist" because I replaced the oil drain bolt with a Fumoto oil drain valve, to speed up future oil changes. Here's some pics:

First, a couple of points: I did this oil change on my 4-post lift. I also used an air ratchet wrench with a Torx T27 bit to remove the (8) engine undertray Torx fasteners. I also cut an oil drain access hole in the undertray for future oil changes (but not for this one).




With the undertray removed, but before removing the oil drain bolt, I covered the "boost pipe" with what I call a "diaper" - a plastic-backed disposable absorbent mat that is commonly used in medical offices and hospitals. My brother-in-law used to work for a company that made these "diapers", and he gave me a case of 300, which should last me a lifetime. Good thing I did use them, because when I pulled the oil drain bolt, the hot gushing oil hit the boost pipe where it is flexible rubber/fabric. We know oil degrades rubber parts. Have a nice big oil catch pan too: the old oil kept gushing out for what seemed like forever. About 8 and 1/2 quarts came out.<br>I then worked from topside: I removed the power steering reservoir spring clip with a small screwdriver to pry it off without bending it, lifted up the reservoir, and tied it off to the side using flexible wire.


I then removed the oil filter housing cap with a 36 mm socket attached to a short 1/2"-drive extension bar, a flexible coupling, another longer extension bar, and a 1/2"-drive ratchet wrench. The cap unscrewed uneventfully, although it would have been easier if I had a straight shot down to the 36mm nut on the oil cap and had not had to use the flex coupling. I put a diaper around the oil filter housing before removing the cap. Although no oil spilled out when I removed the cap, you'll be glad you put rags or something similar in this area, as you will see.




After unscrewing the cap, the fun begins. You see, there's not enough clearance to lift the cap past the pwr steering reservoir, even with it pushed fully to the side. So after saying a choice Swedish curse word, you say "No problem, I'll turn the cap sideways and lift it out". Ah, well the old oil filter is attached to the bottom of the cap, so you first have to pull the old filter off the cap. So you reach down with one hand (only one arm will fit down there), to pull the hot oil filter off (of course we change our oil with the engine warm for a more complete oil drain, right?). Well, there is a cylindrical plastic piece attached to the underside of the oil cap that runs the length of the filter, so it's difficult to separate the filter from the cap. During this time your left forearm is being burned by the top engine mount bracket, and the hot oil on your fingers will test your pain tolerance. And dirty old oil is dripping down in the engine compartment. No problem if everything is covered with diapers.




I got my filter from Boston Village Volvo. Bought the 10-pack. They are Mann filters inside the Volvo boxes.




Tools and parts I used:


Oil drain valve installed. It just clears the boost pipe.



Refilling my engine took 8.5 quarts of Mobil 1 to bring the level to the full mark on the dipstick. That's a whole lot of Mobil 1, and is the same refill amount that my Mercedes S420 used to take.

For my next oil change in 6 months, I plan on using some type of deflector to keep draining oil from hitting the boost pipe, and to guide the oil down the access hole in the engine undertray.

Why Volvo engineers had to make this job so difficult, I have no clue. But I'm sure I'll get better at it with each oil change.

Have fun, guys and gals!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,397 Posts
Re: (hopetonbrown)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>hopetonbrown</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">How very nice of you to take the time to post this.</TD></TR></TABLE><p>Second that!<p>Great work MAC- Now I'm thinking of doing this myself!!! <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/biggrin.gif" BORDER="0"><p>But I'm surprised you had a hard time getting the filter out. I remembered it being no problem to just lift it out. Hmm.<BR><BR>
<i>Modified by vivek9856 at 12:54 PM 5-18-2009</i>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Re: (vivek9856)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>vivek9856</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote"><p>Second that!<p>Great work hopetonbrown - Now I'm thinking of doing this myself!!! <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/biggrin.gif" BORDER="0"><p>But I'm surprised you had a hard time getting the filter out. I remembered it being no problem to just lift it out. Hmm.</TD></TR></TABLE><p>Just hard to get the cap out. Not much room.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Re: DIY Oil Change With A Twist (MAC1LSR)

Good post except it cost me $65.00 since I had to order two of the valves for our Volvos. <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/biggrin.gif" BORDER="0"> I've done a few oil changes on our XC90 with the 3.2L engine and it goes a bit smoother since nothing major is blocking oil filter access. I have yet to change the oil on the S80 V8.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Re: DIY Oil Change With A Twist (arporro)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>arporro</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">Good post except it cost me $65.00 since I had to order two of the valves for our Volvos. <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/biggrin.gif" BORDER="0"> I've done a few oil changes on our XC90 with the 3.2L engine and it goes a bit smoother since nothing major is blocking oil filter access. I have yet to change the oil on the S80 V8.</TD></TR></TABLE><p>Oh, you're using Fumoto drain valves also? I have them on a total of 4 cars, and I think they're great. On my S80, I was able to tighten the valve to the oil pan only by using 3 stacked aluminum washers instead of the plastic washer that comes with the valve. Using less than 3 stacked washers results in the drain valve adapter hitting a high spot on the oil pan before the valve could be fully tightened. I thought for sure it would leak using stacked washers, but it hasn't. I would have preferred to grind down the high spot on the oil pan, but I wasn't about to learn metal grinding on my expensive oil pan. And I didn't know how thick the metal was in that area.<p>I'd like to know how bad the access to the oil filter housing is on the V8. I'm guessing it could be real tough to get at. On my Mercedes-Benz S420, the oil filter housing was located on the side of the block, below an exhaust manifold. When changing the filter element, one had to be very careful not to knock rust flakes off of the manifold and have them drop into the open filter cannister.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Re: DIY Oil Change With A Twist (MAC1LSR)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>MAC1LSR</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote"><p>Oh, you're using Fumoto drain valves also? I have them on a total of 4 cars, and I think they're great. On my S80, I was able to tighten the valve to the oil pan only by using 3 stacked aluminum washers instead of the plastic washer that comes with the valve. Using less than 3 stacked washers results in the drain valve adapter hitting a high spot on the oil pan before the valve could be fully tightened. I thought for sure it would leak using stacked washers, but it hasn't. I would have preferred to grind down the high spot on the oil pan, but I wasn't about to learn metal grinding on my expensive oil pan. And I didn't know how thick the metal was in that area.<p>I'd like to know how bad the access to the oil filter housing is on the V8. I'm guessing it could be real tough to get at. On my Mercedes-Benz S420, the oil filter housing was located on the side of the block, below an exhaust manifold. When changing the filter element, one had to be very careful not to knock rust flakes off of the manifold and have them drop into the open filter cannister.</TD></TR></TABLE><p>I just ordered the valves after seeing your post, so they will not be installed until the next oil change on each vehicle. I have not done an oil change on the V8, so I'll update this thread when that happens. Hopefully, the filter will not be too difficult to replace. <p>I've been running Shell Rotella T 5W-40 Synthetic in the XC90 and it does well. Need the 40 weight here in Arizona due to the heat. I get samples analyzed periodically and the oil is still strong at 6K. I'll extend it to 7K this time and see how it does. <p>BTW - the Zubra / Pirelli P6 wheels are mounted on the S80 and are doing fine. <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/cool.gif" BORDER="0">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Re: DIY Oil Change With A Twist (arporro)

I should have added that no extra washers were needed when I installed a Fumoto oil drain valve (with adapter) on my V70R. Hopefully, you won't need them on your V8, but it would be a good idea to have 3 on-hand when you go to install the valve.<p>Glad you're liking the Zubras/P6's!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,443 Posts
Re: DIY Oil Change With A Twist (MAC1LSR)

Seems like a lot of effort to save the 40 bucks a local garage would charge to change the oil. Maybe if you plan on keeping the car forever it might pay off.... but I would think the electronics on this thing will go way before then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Re: DIY Oil Change With A Twist (Freeworld)

In no way was saving money a factor in my desire to change my oil. If it was, I would have the dealer do it for free. The cost of the Mobil 1 oil and oil filter was $55. The oil drain valve was $32. I did it because I enjoy working on my cars, and I get great satisfaction from doing it myself. Even if I make a mistake, I learn something, so I can do it better the next time. If I really wanted to save money, I would not have gone to the expense to expand my garage to fit-in a 4-post lift, and I would not have invested a couple of thousand dollars (probably more) in tools that I have collected over the past 3 decades. The cost of the garage expansion/renovation and my tools are more than the cost of a new S80. Hey, it's what floats your boat.<br>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,397 Posts
Re: DIY Oil Change With A Twist (Freeworld)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>Freeworld</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">Seems like a lot of effort to save the 40 bucks a local garage would charge to change the oil. Maybe if you plan on keeping the car forever it might pay off.... but I would think the electronics on this thing will go way before then.</TD></TR></TABLE><p>Well, with you adults, time is money. So maybe it would make sense to get the oil changed at a shop for $40. But for me, I have nothing to do with my time, and my time isn't really that much money (haha), and changing oil is fun, so I like to do it myself. <p>But even if I were an adult, I would probably do it myself for the same reasons as MAC. <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://********************/smile/emthup.gif" BORDER="0">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,443 Posts
Re: DIY Oil Change With A Twist (MAC1LSR)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>MAC1LSR</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">In no way was saving money a factor in my desire to change my oil. If it was, I would have the dealer do it for free. The cost of the Mobil 1 oil and oil filter was $55. The oil drain valve was $32. I did it because I enjoy working on my cars, and I get great satisfaction from doing it myself. Even if I make a mistake, I learn something, so I can do it better the next time. If I really wanted to save money, I would not have gone to the expense to expand my garage to fit-in a 4-post lift, and I would not have invested a couple of thousand dollars (probably more) in tools that I have collected over the past 3 decades. The cost of the garage expansion/renovation and my tools are more than the cost of a new S80. Hey, it's what floats your boat.<br></TD></TR></TABLE><p>You also have to want to spend your free time doing it. That is definitely a personal choice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Re: DIY Oil Change With A Twist (Freeworld)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>Freeworld</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">Seems like a lot of effort to save the 40 bucks a local garage would charge to change the oil. Maybe if you plan on keeping the car forever it might pay off.... but I would think the electronics on this thing will go way before then.</TD></TR></TABLE><p>Good quality synthetic oil will cost you $40 due to the high capacity oil pan. Add a filter and labor, and you are looking at the better part of $70 for the oil change. I've changed my own oil for over 30 years now, and don't plan on stopping any time soon. It also gives me the chance to inspect underneath and find leaks, bad cv joint boots and such.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,443 Posts
Re: DIY Oil Change With A Twist (arporro)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>arporro</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote"><p>Good quality synthetic oil will cost you $40 due to the high capacity oil pan. Add a filter and labor, and you are looking at the better part of $70 for the oil change. I've changed my own oil for over 30 years now, and don't plan on stopping any time soon. It also gives me the chance to inspect underneath and find leaks, bad cv joint boots and such.</TD></TR></TABLE><p>Sure, I used to change my oil as well for the first 25 years of driving. But since then I have other things going on in my life that don't afford me the time to do that. Despite the fact that it's a lot harder to do now than it was 25 years ago, if you have a good, trustworthy mechanic, you're all set. Again, just a personal choice on what you want to do with your time. There's nothing I can't physically do, it's just a matter of the tradeoffs you decide to make in life. As you get older, I find the choices easier to make.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
Re: DIY Oil Change With A Twist (MAC1LSR)

Thanks for the post and pics. Today I was able to change the oil and filter in my 2008 XC-70. I tried last Fall and gave up after trying to get the filter cap out and around the PS fluid resovoir. I was still unable to get the cap out so I just moved it to the side while removing the old filter. I was unable to replace the O-ring on the cap. Does anyone think this will be a problem? By the way, I used a long screwdriver to hold the filter down while pulling out the cap. <br>Anyway, I am curious how long those white O-rings will last.<br>Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Re: DIY Oil Change With A Twist (CBJ)

CBJ, I think the O-ring will hold just fine until your next oil change. I was able to get the oil cap out of the engine compartment by tugging upwards on the black plastic top engine cover. It moved just enough (maybe 1/2") for me to get the cap out, lay it on a table, and replace the O-ring. Sorry I didn't put this little tidbit in my original post, but it WAS 1:00 AM or thereabouts when I typed it up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
Re: DIY Oil Change With A Twist (CBJ)

Do you know how to turn off the "Time for Service" message until the next service interval?<br>Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Re: DIY Oil Change With A Twist (CBJ)

I cleared my maintenance reminder message by following a previous post that answered this question. I have a hardcopy of it and keep it in the door pocket of my car, but I don't have it in front of me now. Basically, it is the same procedure as on your R, but instead of turning a key, you will be pressing the Start/Stop button along with the tripmeter reset to perform the reset.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top