SwedeSpeed - Volvo Performance Forum banner
1 - 20 of 64 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,062 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Alright, after much procrastination I finally got my front sway bar swapped out with my new unit from Elevate.

While not too difficult of a job, not too easy of one either since the front bar lives above the front subframe which complicates the procedure.

To help others who will have to deal with the same project, here is a breakdown of the procedure involved and pics to help visualize with.

First off, the engine must be supported while the subframe is dropped. Since I needed my jack for other purposes I purchased a top engine support for this purpose.

The forward jack points must be removed to disconnect the rear of the subframe, so I used some blocks of wood and jackstands to keep the front of the car elevated for the work and not damage the unibody.

To allow the subrame to drop sufficiently in the rear I loosened the front subframe bolts approximately 4 turns

To allow the subframe to drop in the rear enough to remove the bar, I had to unbolt and disconnect the following items from the subframe. Jackplates, front exhaust hangar bracket, steering rack, front engine mount (the one by the crank pulley) and the plastic brackets that secure the power steering and fuel lines to the right side of the subframe.

To keep the steering rack from dropping, I used a couple of tie downs to hold up the tie rod on each side of the rack.

Once everything was disconnected, I then secured the rear of the subframe with my jack, removed the rear subframe bolts and slowly lowered the subframe till it was almost a foot beneath the car. This gave me enough room to remove the mount bolts and remove the bar. You must be careful since the plastic fuel line is one of the few items which runs under the bar and will be pulled down with the frame. It also requires that you snake the bar around it when you finally manage to get it out of there and put the new one in.

Once the old one is out, getting it back together is just a case of exactly the reverse. As you jack the subframe back up, pay careful attention to the fuel and power steering lines. In my case one of the power steering lines almost got caught up in the wrong place between the oil pan and subframe, but fortunately I realized this before forcing it up and causing any damage. The engine may move around a little, and since it is connected to the steering rack via a motor mount, may make a little finessing required to get the rack bolts to line up correctly as you raise the subframe.

But enough of the descriptive part, here are the pics to help clarify the procedure.

My new purchases for my project:


Engine Support In Place:


Supporting The Car:


Securing The Steering Rack:



Lines To Watch & Brackets To Disconnect:


Lowering The Subframe:



Old Bar -vs- New:



New Bar Going In:


Bar Installed and Subframe Ready To Go Back Up, Pay Careful Attention To The Fuel Line Location Under the Bar and Above The Subframe.


Good luck to all my fellow R enthusiasts, on a job like this its best to be prepared. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,306 Posts
is that a grease fitting on the sway bar brackets?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,209 Posts
Nice writeup!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,062 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,062 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
your R needs a sport kit
I love the look of the body kit on a lowered SR, but for practicality and stealthyness reasons, as a daily driver I'm glad my SR is a plain jane, standard height model.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,141 Posts
Wow, when I did my install it was not nearly the production I see going on here. I went really basic on the tools, but I guess it's better to overdo the safety bit. Those grease fittings are comical. I have no idea what Elevate was thinking with those. You just slap the grease on the poly and wrap it around the bar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,141 Posts
Did you put on thicker end-links? You stock ones will really get destroyed with the new bar. Not bent, but the joints will wear out quickly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,342 Posts
i'm getting an indy to put my new sways on this week since this is beyond my mechanical skills, but i enjoyed both write ups
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,882 Posts
Which setting did you use on the sways?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,062 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Oh yes, definantly worth it. I used the stiffest setting in the front and the medium in the back which is a good balance.

I probably wouldn't have bought the engine support bar if not for needing to do the clutch down the road but it was nice to have so I didn't have to keep the engine supported from the bottom where I needed to roll around.

I know the endlinks will probably bite the dust sooner now, but even though they have 105K miles on them now they still ain't broke so I'm not going to fix them yet, lol.

I assumef the grease fitting is just a standard part on the bracket that they sourced for this thing. Who knows, perhaps you could get to them with the right kind of lube connector though.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,444 Posts
Great write-up. I like your mechanical skills.

So you're saying it is worth it? How much thicker is the elevate bar? From the looks of it it's not that much thicker...hhmmm

I'll be tackling the same job in a few months and this write-up will definatley help out. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,062 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The old front bar measures 23.85 mm.

The new bar is also designed differently at the ends and who knows what kind of material difference there might be as well.

In addition to the better roll controll, one of the best features is that the car is pretty close to neutral balance again as compared to the oversteering tendencies it had with just the rear bar in.

On big sweepers the front tires will now give a much better audible report when they are reaching their limits as well.

Just to put it into perspective, the big interstate exit sweeper I hit each day at a safe speed of 80 now feels just as well planted at 90, lol. :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,282 Posts
Liked the write up, especially with the key points noted about fuel lines etc. I can't wait for my sways to finally get here, although I will be a little hesitant to install the front kit right away.

BTW, you spend your free time and $$$ very wisely sir...Swedespeed, out with chicks, DIY SS write-ups, birthday parties with chicks, Auto-X and pool parties with scantily clad chicks. Its all w1n! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,123 Posts
Great write-up! Though I don't plan to upgrade my sway bar, it is nice to see that some cheap Harbor Freight tools and a little determination can go a long way.

Also- the Zerk fittings are a nice touch to the new bar. If you don't personally have a grease gun, you can take it to a quick lube place and have them give it a couple pumps. It will limit wear on the bushings, and make it stay tight (like new).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,062 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
BTW, you spend your free time and $$$ very wisely sir...Swedespeed, out with chicks, DIY SS write-ups, birthday parties with chicks, Auto-X and pool parties with scantily clad chicks. Its all w1n! :D
Its all about balance, there were times in my life when it was either all cars or all women and both at the same time is definantly better, lol. :p

Glad this is all behind me now though, the only thing that made it a PIA and slow me down was the florida heat. I probably drank two liters of water and juice while I was getting this all done with temps in the 90s and humidity levels around 80%.

When the time comes to do the clutch I will definantly try to do it in the fall or winter if I have a choice, that's for sure, lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,157 Posts
The old front bar measures 23.85 mm.

The new bar is also designed differently at the ends and who knows what kind of material difference there might be as well.

In addition to the better roll controll, one of the best features is that the car is pretty close to neutral balance again as compared to the oversteering tendencies it had with just the rear bar in.

On big sweepers the front tires will now give a much better audible report when they are reaching their limits as well.

Just to put it into perspective, the big interstate exit sweeper I hit each day at a safe speed of 80 now feels just as well planted at 90, lol. :cool:
You just convinced me not to do the front bar.

Thanks,

Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,248 Posts
You just convinced me not to do the front bar.

Thanks,

Jeff
When i did my sways over 1.5 years ago i did both, im glad i did .i heard storys of people just getting the rear and HATING it, but thts just what i herd. me i like to be glued to the road so i went full track spec.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,062 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Don't worry, you still have a little oversteer if you need it, and don't forget I'm running full stiffness in the front and medium in the back.

Its just closer to neutral than it was with just the rear bar in, it had TOO MUCH OVERSTEER that way, for example the rear of my car had some bad tendencies at the limit when I really pushed it at an auto-x a few weeks ago. I think it was due to the rear inside tire trying to lift due to the mismatched roll resistance.

Trust me, when it come to really pushing the car, you will want the bigger bar up front. If you still want it to be pretty tail crazy, try full stiffness up front and rear instead. Plus there is one more setting after that, full stiffness in the back and min stiff up front if you really have a lust for oversteer, lol.
 
1 - 20 of 64 Posts
Top