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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So, nice shiny new internally regulated 65 amp alternator, ready to go and I discover that at some point over the last few decades the stud that the adjustment arm is attached to is striiped beyond repair. Any ideas? Can it be remvoed and replaced? Are there any options for repairing it?

Brad
 

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Is the stud stripped? If it's just screwed in with a Vise Grips you should just be able to unscrew and replace it. A good Vise Grips now that thay are made in China thay don't work as well. If it's the hole in the casting then a Heli Coil kit should do it. When you buy a Heli coil kit you may want to buy the right size drill bit at the same time. Don't know about you but IF I do have the right size bit it's dull !
 

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So, nice shiny new internally regulated 65 amp alternator, ready to go and I discover that at some point over the last few decades the stud that the adjustment arm is attached to is striiped beyond repair. Any ideas? Can it be remvoed and replaced? Are there any options for repairing it?

Brad
Pic please.

Thanks.

George Dill
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
As you can see, the stud is missing thread toward the end, and does not have enough thread to actually fasten a nut to, with the arm and washer. The end was mushroomed, and I ground off the extra material so I could actually fit a nut on it.

I am unsure of what I would replace it with, would I need to get an engine stud? ot find a bolt of equal size and grind off the threaded end?

 

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If (I said IF) That stud is threaded in I would spray it with WD-40( or something like it) then tap on the end of it with a small hammer to break it loose then unscrew it and replace it.

If you break it your looking at drilling it so bear that in mind !
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The stupid thing is so out of round that I might end up drilling it anyway. Anybody have any idea how deep the blasted thing goes? Ha ha. Should I drill it with a slightly bigger bit as to avoid turning the stud into a sleeve?

This bites, its the next to last step before I can crank it again. I have to reinstall the radiator, hook the three wires to the alternator, go over my schematic one last time and have it running again finally. I will be posting to my blog with the final steps on the Painless wiring install and battery relocation soon. Thanks guys www.brads122s.blogspot.com
 

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You probably aren't going to be able to get a die on that thing in that location (and even if you do manage to, you will probably end up hating yourself for even trying such a silly thing).

make your life easier and get a set of these:


Irwin bolt extractors. They are like magic for rounded off studs and broken bolts such as the one in your picture.
 

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It looks like you already started it, but if you have a dremmel tool or an air grinding tool, you could make two flats on the side, so that the vicegripts could get a strong grab. Penetrating oil (better than WD40) can help too. Also, may be some heat on the surrounding metal (but not the stud itself). When you try to turn it with the vice grips, try to turn slightly both directions. Then, when you are about to give it the final try, a sudden move rather than gradual torque application may be best. As others said, tapping helps too.
 

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If nothing else works, you could try welding a nut onto the stud and using that to turn it out.
 

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Whatever you have to grip it with, use that and just UNSCREW it. It won't be that tight. All the other suggestions are MUCH harder.
If you grip with Vise grips, make sure they have SHARP teeth and grip it VERY tightly. If you have to unscrew it 1/8 turn at a time that is still quicker than most of the other fixes offered.
 

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Whatever you have to grip it with, use that and just UNSCREW it. It won't be that tight. All the other suggestions are MUCH harder.
If you grip with Vise grips, make sure they have SHARP teeth and grip it VERY tightly. If you have to unscrew it 1/8 turn at a time that is still quicker than most of the other fixes offered.
Nah, just because you and I are too old to struggle doesn't mean we can't enjoy watching the younguns.

Here's me back in my early daze...

Smack that sucker with hammer and bend it stopping just before the hit that would break the stud. Grab the angled stud with water pumps and wiggle the pee out of it then unscrew it. Pound it straight, chase the threads then screw it back in bad-threads-first. Grind an exact-fit nut down thin and thread it on the stud tight. Fit the bracket but before you fit the new nut thread it onto another stud/bolt and smack the pee out of it cause a slight oval shape.

George Dill
 

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This is getting funny. I am sure he got that stud off by now. But John's suggestion of welding a nut is real good. So, if no luck so far, here is another crazy-sounding suggestion. If the car cannot be driven to a place with a welder, I think the issue would be because the belt is off. May be you can buy and install a loose fit smaller belt (measure with a rope) that spins only the water pump (less than $10) and drive the car to a shop with a welder. Even if its very loose, it will still spin the water pump for a while. The car can handle a short trip without an alternator, especially if the battery is charged, and you have an extra person to help you push-start it.

I had driven my B18 without a fan belt at all (don't ask why) for about 2 miles. Lots of cooling stops in between! ;)
 

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If every thing fails and you end up with a brocken stud in a threaded hole then a reverse twist drill bits are worth a shot.
While your buying the reverse bit also get the proper Heli Coil kit with the proper drill bit.
The reverse drill bits only work about 50% of the time for me anyway.

I bet Brad got it out by now with a Vise Grips.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ok, welding the nut, no go. Vise grips, no go (nothing to do with age ha ha). Next up, grinding and drilling.

Thanks guys.
 

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I'd just run a die down on it and get two nuts that fit the new threads. Tightly run the two nuts together and then turn the back one counter-clockwise. It should turn the entire stud, then you can just replace it with a new one. No drilling, cutting, or grinding, and no re-tapping the block itself.

If you don't have a tap and die kit, just buy one. I promise you'll use it.
 

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I've always found putting a little heat on a decimated stud with a blowtorch does wonders ... but this looks like a tough one. Better make an offering to the god of stud extraction. I've found that tossing a virgin into a volcano always works ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Unfortunately at least one of the two parts of that sacrifice is kinda thin on the ground down here.

Brad
 
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