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I have looked at a lot of instrument panels in the last year in a wide range of new car brands and models, and Volvo is the only brand I've seen that doesn't show engine coolant temperature. There are plenty of other things that Volvo has in Sensus that I'll never need or use; I do wish it would put temperature back front and center, with the fuel level.
 

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A temp gauge wouldn't help in this case. You get the error the second the car detects it is overheating, exactly the same as if you had a gauge. I would say it is actually easier to see an error in the display, than a gauge moving to the red area.

They said the original pipe was created for cooler northern hemisphere regions and unsuitable for harsher and hot southern hemisphere climate.
BS, I was the first one that reported this issue in this forum and happened to me in Canada, in the middle of the winter. So no, it was not created for cooler regions. All cars affected are having the hose replaced, because regardless of the weather it is too short and gets loose spilling the coolant.
 

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My BAFX OBD2 scanner & Torque Pro pics. For trailer pulling purposes, I'm bit disappointed in the available OBD information available from the XC90. While coolant temperature is my main objective, engine load and perhaps catalytic converter temp are perhaps secondary monitor points. Semi-trucks usually have an exhaust pyrometer - so looking at the cat temp might be similar.



 

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Anyone tried the BlueDriver Bluetooth Professional OBDII?

I bought one a while back. Mainly because my smog guy would use one to check system readiness before hooking up to smog machine. I have found it to be one of the better ones to use.
 

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You seem to base your argument on some past experience with other vehicles or with other types of sensors.

The sensors that were on my MY16 XC90 were dTPMS and had no issue whatsoever with knowing which sensor was where. IIRC, the manual mentioned something to the effect that the car could automatically figure out which sensor was on which wheel.

They were also quite accurate, always matching the reading from my trusty pressure measurement device.

I miss the dTPMS on my MY18 XC90. It sucks that they dropped the option from the newer builds.

iTPMS is not nearly as useful since it is impossible to know what is the "acceptable" range that yields a green vs other colors. It also requires you to drive several miles before it can figure anything out. It MUST be carefully calibrated or the readings will be utter nonsense. As far as I'm concerned, iTPMS is essentially useless. It cannot be trusted. It is the poor man's approach to measuring tire pressure and as such, it is much less accurate than pretty much any other method.



iTPMS doesn't solve anything. It reduces cost for the manufacturer - that's the only "issue" it solves.
Totally agree on this topic. We replaced my wife's 2016 Accord Sport with a 2018 XC90 T8 Inscription, and I was looking forward to moving from the "poor-man's" iTPMS that her Accord had to dTPMS, that all the cars I've owned (including a Kia and a Genesis) for the last 8-9 years have had. I knew that 2016 and 2017 XC90s had dTPMS so I didn't bother researching any further, and was shocked when I discovered that in 2018 they switched to iTPMS.

I hate not knowing even a range of pressures, and that I'll only be alerted if the car thinks there's a problem. Even in my Genesis some time ago at night we hit a massive pothole on an unlit state highway (with one oncoming car's headlights glaring us in the face) that destroyed (ok, editorializing, it was bent) the passenger front wheel and tire. With dTPMS the tire pressure light didn't illuminate but I immediately flipped over to the tire pressure screen on the dash and saw the pressure slowly dropping, so I was able to pull over in a well lit gas station (the only one around, in that stretch in po-dunk Arkansas). The light finally illuminated when I stopped the car and the tire was clearly already completely flat. Luckily the display also confirmed that even though the rear had also impacted, it was holding pressure just fine, no need to call a tow truck at 10pm with two flat tires and one spare...

I realize this would take an extreme stint of not driving the car during a huge temp swing or change of season, but also with iTPMS, say you haven't driven the car in two months, and the temp has dropped an average of 60-70 degrees F. All your tires have deflated several psi equally, so iTPMS reports "no problem here, boss" even though you really need to stop and put 5-7psi in every single tire. dTPMS would tell you that, but to my knowledge iTPMS won't ever know there's an issue (therefore it's not really "pressure monitoring" it's really just monitoring for leaks or flats, as those extreme cases are the only way a lamp is illuminated on the dash.)
 
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