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I use an Ultra gauge in my 02 V40. It is also an OBD11 reader.
It is able to provide dozens of different readings and i find it especially accurate for coolant temperature, being one of the most important if one has unexpected issues. Another fairly similar one is a Scangauge.
Simply connect it to cars the OBD11 plug in point and mount the gauge neatly in a suitable location you find convenient.
 

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That's not possible with the type of TPMS system in use on new Volvos. Your jeep and BMW both have Direct TPMS / dTPMS, while your Volvo has Indirect TPMS / iTPMS. The dTPMS use an actual pressure sensor in the wheel, but comes at the cost of having to be maintained and rebuilt at every tire change which costs money. It also will tell you the wrong wheel if your wheels get rotated, and won't work at all if you put on winter wheels without buying and programming an whole new set of sensors. These sensors also go bad from time to time, and can cost a bit to repair, and I've found them to be not all that accurate anyway. The indirect TPMS system on your Volvo requires no maintenance, and uses the same sensors as traction control and ABS to tell if a tire is low on pressure. It can't tell you the individual pressure, because it isn't reading the actual pressure, but instead how the wheel behaves: vibration, rotational speed, etc. Both systems have merit, and the iTPMS is probably the way of the future.
I don't understand what you mean by this: "It also will tell you the wrong wheel if your wheels get rotated, and won't work at all if you put on winter wheels without buying and programming an whole new set of sensors" as there's a button on Sensus to recalibrate TPMS readings or settings after tyre changes or wheel alignments etc.

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These sensors also go bad from time to time, and can cost a bit to repair, and I've found them to be not all that accurate anyway.
I am curious to know how you established that the reading of the sensors is not accurate.
Sensors do go bad. however, they don't have a reputation of being unreliable.
 

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I am curious to know how you established that the reading of the sensors is not accurate.
Sensors do go bad. however, they don't have a reputation of being unreliable.
I also wonder where he got the evidence that the reading of the sensors is wrong because I've tested the readings displayed on the gauge vs my Sensus' display and they both reflected the same readings

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I also wonder where he got the evidence that the reading of the sensors is wrong because I've tested the readings displayed on the gauge vs my Sensus' display and they both reflected the same readings
There may be a factor missing in assessing the accuracy of the TMPS sensors that people may
lead to the conclusion that they are not accurate.
If, as is the case with my BMW motorcycle, the Volvo takes into account the temperature reading
that is also transmitted by the sensors to apply a pressure compensation to a fixed ambient
temperature, then the readings with a gauge will only be comparable with those of the sensors
if done at (more or less) this ambient temperature. The compensation method makes sense, it
allowes for the readings to be meaningfull, no matter what the temperature of the tyres is.
It is possible to establish if the Volvo TPMS system does temperature compensation.
The readings of the sensors should approximately be the same wether the tyres are cold or warm/hot.
 

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There may be a factor missing in assessing the accuracy of the TMPS sensors that people may
lead to the conclusion that they are not accurate.
If, as is the case with my BMW motorcycle, the Volvo takes into account the temperature reading
that is also transmitted by the sensors to apply a pressure compensation to a fixed ambient
temperature, then the readings with a gauge will only be comparable with those of the sensors
if done at (more or less) this ambient temperature. The compensation method makes sense, it
allowes for the readings to be meaningfull, no matter what the temperature of the tyres is.
It is possible to establish if the Volvo TPMS system does temperature compensation.
The readings of the sensors should approximately be the same wether the tyres are cold or warm/hot.
Mine only shows tyre pressures and no temperature readings.

But I checked what was displayed on Sensus with what the electric gauge attached to the tyre showed. The readings were the same

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My Volvo (2016) has the direct tpms. When driving I can watch the pressure increase as the tires get up to opperating temperature on a drive. Also the Volvo self learns the sensor possition and ID if a sensor is changed like when swapping snow tires and summer tires on separate wheels. On my Volt I have to know where the wheel sensor actually is compared with how it is displayed.
 

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Mine only shows tyre pressures and no temperature readings.

But I checked what was displayed on Sensus with what the electric gauge attached to the tyre showed. The readings were the same

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I probably wasn't clear about the temperature. Sorry for the confusion.
It is not a reading by itself, but (at least in some vehicles) used to correct the pressure reading to a
fixed ambient temperature. Do you know at what ambient temperature you compared the readings?
 

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I probably wasn't clear about the temperature. Sorry for the confusion.
It is not a reading by itself, but (at least in some vehicles) used to correct the pressure reading to a
fixed ambient temperature. Do you know at what ambient temperature you compared the readings?
It was at dusk one summer evening, and I read them at the same time. If I were to speculate, Temperature was about 26°C

And my tyres were cold because I always check tyre pressure on cold tyres before driving off.

Prior to the visit to the fuel station, my car was parked the entire day in the garage and I just went to refill fuel in preparation of my long distance trip the next day.

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It was at dusk one summer evening, and I read them at the same time. If I were to speculate, Temperature was about 26°C

And my tyres were cold because I always check tyre pressure on cold tyres before driving off.

Prior to the visit to the fuel station, my car was parked the entire day in the garage and I just went to refill fuel in preparation of my long distance trip the next day.

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I think it is fair to say that the conditions for a reliable comparision were met!
 

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I don't understand what you mean by this: "It also will tell you the wrong wheel if your wheels get rotated, and won't work at all if you put on winter wheels without buying and programming an whole new set of sensors" as there's a button on Sensus to recalibrate TPMS readings or settings after tyre changes or wheel alignments etc.
On a car with dTPMS, it often isn't as easy as "just push a button." The car has no way of knowing which sensor is where unless you go through a reprogramming procedure. Also if you put winter wheels on your car, you will have to buy and program a whole new set of sensors, and reprogram your old sensors when you switch back to your summer tires.

Since new Volvos have iTPMS, these problems go away.

I am curious to know how you established that the reading of the sensors is not accurate.
Sensors do go bad. however, they don't have a reputation of being unreliable.
I also wonder where he got the evidence that the reading of the sensors is wrong because I've tested the readings displayed on the gauge vs my Sensus' display and they both reflected the same readings
My Volvo/New Volvos don't have direct sensors, so I can't compare, but I've seen several cars that friends and family had where the sensor was reading several PSI off from what a variety of well calibrated pressure gauges stated. IE: TPMS says 35, 39, 31, 34 psi, when gauges confirmed they were all at at 35psi.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 · (Edited)
I had my car serviced today. It turns out that the leaking bleeder hose attached to the cooling system expansion tank was already replaced by my home dealer two weeks ago (Service Action #S29846). Apparently this service action is being performed on all US vehicles as they come in for service. The problem as explained to me by the Denver dealer I visited today was that my home dealer's mechanic didn't firmly connect the hose to the expansion tank. It might have looked like it was attached, but the connection was obviously leaking. I assumed that fasteners like this were designed to be either connected or disconnected - nothing in between. Apparently Volvo has engineered an exception. I would also hope that any time a tech replaces a part of the cooling system they would follow-up with a pressure test, but I doubt my home dealer did that or they would have noticed the leak. The Denver dealer did perform a pressure test after fixing the connection.

I purchased an Automatic Pro with the hopes of viewing coolant temperature, but the only real-time data the Automatic app reports is location. Everything else is reported at the end of each trip and it's nothing I care about so I will be returning it.

EDIT: Before returning the Automatic Pro, I looked on the Apple App Store to see if another app could interface with the Automatic Pro. An app called “OBD Fusion” looked like it might work, so I sent the company an email and they confirmed that it does interface with the Automatic Pro (and a few other OBD devices). I installed the app and have gotten it to display real-time engine data including coolant temperature and will post details below when I’ve had a chance to use it more.
 

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On a car with dTPMS, it often isn't as easy as "just push a button." The car has no way of knowing which sensor is where unless you go through a reprogramming procedure. Also if you put winter wheels on your car, you will have to buy and program a whole new set of sensors, and reprogram your old sensors when you switch back to your summer tires.

Since new Volvos have iTPMS, these problems go away.



My Volvo/New Volvos don't have direct sensors, so I can't compare, but I've seen several cars that friends and family had where the sensor was reading several PSI off from what a variety of well calibrated pressure gauges stated. IE: TPMS says 35, 39, 31, 34 psi, when gauges confirmed they were all at at 35psi.
Simple isn't always better, the iTPMS versus dTPMS is a good example. dTPMS sensors aren't very expensive.
The measurements you refer to aren't relevant without mentioning the ambient temperature.
That's not different when a calibrated gauge is used.
Probably the best thing to do would be to measure/compare at about 20°C ambient and tyre temperature.
 

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On a car with dTPMS, it often isn't as easy as "just push a button." The car has no way of knowing which sensor is where unless you go through a reprogramming procedure. Also if you put winter wheels on your car, you will have to buy and program a whole new set of sensors, and reprogram your old sensors when you switch back to your summer tires.
You seem to base your argument on some past experience with other vehicles or with other types of sensors.

The sensors that were on my MY16 XC90 were dTPMS and had no issue whatsoever with knowing which sensor was where. IIRC, the manual mentioned something to the effect that the car could automatically figure out which sensor was on which wheel.

They were also quite accurate, always matching the reading from my trusty pressure measurement device.

I miss the dTPMS on my MY18 XC90. It sucks that they dropped the option from the newer builds.

iTPMS is not nearly as useful since it is impossible to know what is the "acceptable" range that yields a green vs other colors. It also requires you to drive several miles before it can figure anything out. It MUST be carefully calibrated or the readings will be utter nonsense. As far as I'm concerned, iTPMS is essentially useless. It cannot be trusted. It is the poor man's approach to measuring tire pressure and as such, it is much less accurate than pretty much any other method.

Since new Volvos have iTPMS, these problems go away.
iTPMS doesn't solve anything. It reduces cost for the manufacturer - that's the only "issue" it solves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 · (Edited)
Here are the default real-time displays for the OBD Fusion app running on an iPhone SE and synchronizing with an Automatic Pro OBD reader connected to a 2016 XC90:







The "Engine Temp" gauge is coolant temperature. Custom gauges can be configured including engine oil temperature, hybrid battery pack remaining life and many more (assuming the vehicle's computer will report these standard values). The X/Y acceleration gauges use the phone's accelerometer and not the vehicle's. The OBD Fusion app also has a 0-60, 1/4 mile etc. performance page, a diagnostic page, GPS tracking and some other features. The Automatic app also has GPS tracking, a diagnostic page and a log book.

In order for the OBD Fusion app to report real-time values, the Automatic app also has to be running and you have to press a <connect> button in the OBD Fusion app. Setup wasn't too difficult, but you have to enable streaming app auto-connect in the Automatic app before it will communicate with the OBD Fusion app.

I guess I'll keep this solution in place and see how I like it over time. I expect the most useful gauges for my purposes will be engine oil temperature, coolant temperature and battery voltage, but I'll only monitor the temperature gauges while towing or otherwise stressing the vehicle.
 

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Here are the default real-time displays for the OBD Fusion app running on an iPhone SE and synchronizing with an Automatic Pro connected to a 2016 XC90:







The "Engine Temp" gauge is coolant temperature. Custom gauges can be configured including engine oil temperature, hybrid battery pack remaining life and many more (assuming the vehicle's computer will report these standard values). The X/Y acceleration gauges use the phone's accelerometer and not the vehicle's. The OBD Fusion app also has a 0-60, 1/4 mile etc. performance page, a diagnostic page, GPS tracking and some other features. The Automatic app also has GPS tracking, a diagnostic page and a log book.

In order for the OBD Fusion app to report real-time values, the Automatic app also has to be running and you have to press a <connect> button in the OBD Fusion app. Setup wasn't too difficult, but you have to enable streaming app auto-connect in the Automatic app before it will communicate with the OBD Fusion app.

I guess I'll keep this solution in place and see how I like it over time. I expect the most useful gauges for my purposes will be engine oil temperature, coolant temperature and battery voltage, but I'll only monitor the temperature gauges while towing or otherwise stressing the vehicle.
Cool!

What model OBD reader did you use and where can I buy it?

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Here are the default real-time displays for the OBD Fusion app running on an iPhone SE and synchronizing with an Automatic Pro OBD reader connected to a 2016 XC90:







The "Engine Temp" gauge is coolant temperature. Custom gauges can be configured including engine oil temperature, hybrid battery pack remaining life and many more (assuming the vehicle's computer will report these standard values). The X/Y acceleration gauges use the phone's accelerometer and not the vehicle's. The OBD Fusion app also has a 0-60, 1/4 mile etc. performance page, a diagnostic page, GPS tracking and some other features. The Automatic app also has GPS tracking, a diagnostic page and a log book.

In order for the OBD Fusion app to report real-time values, the Automatic app also has to be running and you have to press a <connect> button in the OBD Fusion app. Setup wasn't too difficult, but you have to enable streaming app auto-connect in the Automatic app before it will communicate with the OBD Fusion app.

I guess I'll keep this solution in place and see how I like it over time. I expect the most useful gauges for my purposes will be engine oil temperature, coolant temperature and battery voltage, but I'll only monitor the temperature gauges while towing or otherwise stressing the vehicle.
Which OBD value is it using for the boost reading?


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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Can it show fuel trim also?
There are a ton of fuel trim parameters - e.g. "Short term fuel trim (Bank 1, Sensor 1)," "Short term fuel trim (Bank 1, Sensor 2)" etc. If you have an OBDII SAE PID list and you want me to test a specific variable, let me know. Even if the parameter you're looking for exists, the car may or may not report it when queried by the OBD Fusion app/OBD adapter. For example, the "O2 Sensor 2" gauge reports a value, but the "O2 Sensor 1" gauge does not.

What model OBD reader did you use and where can I buy it?
This is an Automatic Pro. I bought it in person at a Best Buy store, but it's available on Amazon as well. This particular adapter is for the US market only, as it includes 3G cellular service for five years. The OBD Fusion app is compatible with a few other adapters which are listed here:

https://www.obdsoftware.net/software/obdfusion

The OBD Fusion app does allow you to select metric units.

Which OBD value is it using for the boost reading?
That is a calculated PID called "Boost." I can't tell which SAE PIDs it is using to make the calculation or what the equation is.
 

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There are a ton of fuel trim parameters - e.g. "Short term fuel trim (Bank 1, Sensor 1)," "Short term fuel trim (Bank 1, Sensor 2)"
It's the short and long term fuel trim(s) I am interested in, I use it to see if the system needs to "trim"
to keep lambda at 1. What I hope to see is that it doesn't have to :cool:
 
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