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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So we have a big snow storm in Northeast last weekend. After I pull away my 2015 V60- I noticed some neon green droplets as pictured on snow where the car was parked.



I checked coolant level - sure enough its low. I thought it's coolant somehow leaked and took it to dealer. Dealer did some pressure test - didn't find leak. But they did find some washer on windshield solvent reservoir needing replacement. Suggesting that might have been it.

However I am skeptical. Because coolant topped off about 1 month ago to the max. During the period, probably driven some 3 or 4k miles. Thoughts? Is this normal? What else I can do?

Thanks in advance.
 

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one way is to get some coolant out of the reservoir and place it in the snow next to your droplets then do the same to the windshield fluid. It should look the same or similar to one.
 

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Have or had the same issue...

First winter low coolant light - had it toped off.
Second winter during the coldest week found some coolant in the snow on my driveway - had it toped off and asked for a pressure test, dealer found nothing.

So far so good this winter however we have had a very unusual mild winter.
I'm thinking it's weather related...
 

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I know what that is. I copied this from a website for the explanation. I'm a tech and customers always come in with the mysterious yellow snow thinking there leaking. 95 per cent of the exhaust systems built today are made up of iron alloy and galvanized steel. Exhaust pipes are made of either iron or stainless steel. Heat shields are made of galvanized steel. galvanized steel uses zinc as a rust inhibiter.

Zinc, when hot and in the presence of iron and a catalyst, creates yellow zinc oxide in the form of crystals. The connection is the catalyst - salt water - or compacted snow with road salt mixed in. If the snow is able to touch the exhaust heat shields and the exhaust pipes at the same time, the chemical reaction between the two dissimilar metals creates the bright yellow crystals.


As the hot exhaust pipe(s) melt the snow, the yellow substance drops to the snow covered ground - causing much consternation.
 

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MacGyver, is that you??

Awesome info :thumbup:
 

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I know what that is. I copied this from a website for the explanation. I'm a tech and customers always come in with the mysterious yellow snow thinking there leaking. 95 per cent of the exhaust systems built today are made up of iron alloy and galvanized steel. Exhaust pipes are made of either iron or stainless steel. Heat shields are made of galvanized steel. galvanized steel uses zinc as a rust inhibiter.

Zinc, when hot and in the presence of iron and a catalyst, creates yellow zinc oxide in the form of crystals. The connection is the catalyst - salt water - or compacted snow with road salt mixed in. If the snow is able to touch the exhaust heat shields and the exhaust pipes at the same time, the chemical reaction between the two dissimilar metals creates the bright yellow crystals.


As the hot exhaust pipe(s) melt the snow, the yellow substance drops to the snow covered ground - causing much consternation.
Great info and I did notice droplets from exhaust... Just strange as my coolant was low at the same, coincidence?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Great info.

in my case, coolant level gone from max to min in less than 30 days, drove about 3 or 4k during the the month. Is this normal too?
 

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kentai, Are you measuring coolant level consistantly on either a cool/warm/hot engine? Fluctuation in the overflow reservoir is normal within a certain range depending on engine temp and ambient temps.
 
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