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I think you guys are missing the bigger picture:

1. Toyota, Honda, etc all suffered from piston ring / consumption issues at one point. Similar to Volvo

2. Our repair stories (and multiple trips to dealer) are anecdotal and not reflective of a large slice of owners

3. I'm sure Lexus, Toyota, and Honda have all had issues to some degree, but repairs on "Mainstream Cars" are far less costly than Volvo, BMW, Mercedes, etc. So I am wondering if Consumer Reports is calculating repair costs in their survey. Clearly, it's going to cost far more to repair a Volvo than a Toyota.

4. Consumer reports should elaborate on their rankings, by posting their survey and an asterisk beside each vehicle on what the most common repairs / complaints were on that given brand. Without knowing the most common failures and the questions asked, it's very hard to judge if Toyota is "more reliable" and Volvo "less reliable"
This is the answer to every comment on here… clearly the Volvo board is going to have more people posting volvo issues than say Toyota issues.. we have a small and biased sample that behaves similarly.
 

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The SPA XC90 had the burden of "going first" with the total revamp of the Volvo line, so it's to be expected that there will be more issues both real and perceived. If I recall correctly, a lot of the early negative press on the XC90 involved Sensus, more so than mechanical or electrical issues. For sure there are issues, but I wonder if it's been more tainted because it was first out of the gate.
I think this is right. It may be why Toyota/Lexus is on top. They are intentionally late out of the gate, to do their own engineering....and also learn from others' experience....and failures.

I just love my 2006 V8 Ocean Race XC90...just a unique work of art and impressive piece of machinery with that Yamaha V8. But my 2010 Lexus GX460 is in another league entirely. It's like driving a bank vault down the road....in both a good way...and a bad way.

I was thinking of getting a 2016+ XC90, but was put off by reliability issues, electronics, complex powerplant, leaking sunroof, etc. They are works of art....but technology....not si much.. I decided to try the Lexus GX460 instead. I test drove a 2018 and a 2010 GX460....and almost couldn't tell difference! I like the old 2010 GX grille/body style better. So I bought that....and saved $25,000....

I would get in the 2010 GX460 and drive it across the country tomorrow. The 2006 XC90, I would not. About same mileage, (140,000 +-) on each

I also have a 2017 Ford F150 for work,, with their twin turbo V6 3.5 Ecoboost, which was not particularly new then, but has been a complete fiasco with that engine, among other items. For example, Ford can't make a door latch that works when it's below freezing, but can still sell a million trucks a year. So I guess they don't have to.

For 2022, Toyota has just now implemented a similar V6 twin turbo in its Tundra to replace the V8. I'm hoping it will be in another league entirely than F150 and will dump the F150 for a Tundra when market cools a bit.

First mover advantage may not apply to auto manufacturers.....

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The worst thing about a brand with a lot of reliability issues is that it normalizes the condition. A service advisor refused to warranty repair a problem on my car with the excuse “you should see how bad my Volvo is, way worse than what you’re experiencing “

also Volvo wants to make a profit so the more repair issues they have coming in the more likey they are to try to dodge warranty repair for as long as possible. If they can push you past the warranty period they suddenly this problem becomes a big money maker for them and their dealers. Alternatively they can do super shady things like repair faulty rotors but refuse to include brake pads because they are “wear items” and then charge $1000 for brake pads.

so yeah, Volvo needs to improve on reliability if they want to sell more cars to more repeat buyers. Every person that has to go to Service is a potentially very unhappy person because Service at dealers will always be a very dodgy place for reasons mentioned above.
 

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The worst thing about a brand with a lot of reliability issues is that it normalizes the condition. A service advisor refused to warranty repair a problem on my car with the excuse “you should see how bad my Volvo is, way worse than what you’re experiencing “

also Volvo wants to make a profit so the more repair issues they have coming in the more likey they are to try to dodge warranty repair for as long as possible. If they can push you past the warranty period they suddenly this problem becomes a big money maker for them and their dealers. Alternatively they can do super shady things like repair faulty rotors but refuse to include brake pads because they are “wear items” and then charge $1000 for brake pads.

so yeah, Volvo needs to improve on reliability if they want to sell more cars to more repeat buyers. Every person that has to go to Service is a potentially very unhappy person because Service at dealers will always be a very dodgy place for reasons mentioned above.
Sounds more like a shady dealer than endemic brand issues. My dealer hasn't be perfect, and let me down here and there, but generally I am more than happy with their work. They haven't tried nickel and diming me on repairs under warranty.

You forget something, if a customer keeps coming in with a problem, that monopolizes their tech's time. It's not in the techs best interest to see this customer and and over until finally "deciding to fix the problem". It wastes the dealer's time, occupies the tech with one job, preventing him from working on others, and pisses off the customer.
 
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It just amazes me that we continue to buy Volvo's even after knowing that reliability scores are so bad. I want to understand what is the psychological term for this type of decision making? 😆 I am on my 4th Volvo and for sure I had experienced issues with all the cars but continue to persevere through them. Logic vs. Emotional purchase I guess..
hi, i don't want to tempt faith ,i have a 2015 Volvo v 40 diesel auto & not had a hiccup from it .
 

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Not limited to XC90. My 2 month old 2022 XC60 T8 Inscription is scheduled for its 3rd trip to the service department - all for software issues.Volvo's transition to the Google platform has been executed poorly. I loss most of comms with GPS and streaming services (via on-board cellular). This meant if I was in an accident, I can call SOS, but they would not have been automatically alerted had I been in an accident. And when I called SOS operator (I got at least that function), they confirmed the car did not send its location. What if I was in an accident where I was unconscious? The fix was resetting the telematics module. Less than 3 weeks after that fix, I loss both SOS and ON-Call comms, this time I got the alert they were not working. It returned the next day, but jeez! Don't get me started on the Volvo On-call App - even worse. Do USA lemon laws apply to software problems?[/QUOTE]
 

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I have read CR for a long time and I think their reviews can be helpful.

But I have always felt that their automotive dept is staffed by people who are not "car people". The things they value are not what I value.

A good example is the Subaru. They almost always rate them very highly, but in general, Subarus are seriously underpowered.

One thing that they and other reviewers have dinged Volvo on are the informatics, and indeed that's why I went out of my way to but a 2018 V60. My question is why on earth doesn't Volvo beta test with customers? You would only need maybe 5 people to test a the new design because they would all hate it. Then, fix it. Or, even now, fix it. It's a really stupid design.

But why doesn't CR go after some of the other companies with stupid informatics? They downrate Volvo really heavily for that but actually the rest of the car is good

I don't know - their balance is just off.
 

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I have read CR for a long time and I think their reviews can be helpful.

But I have always felt that their automotive dept is staffed by people who are not "car people". The things they value are not what I value.

A good example is the Subaru. They almost always rate them very highly, but in general, Subarus are seriously underpowered.

One thing that they and other reviewers have dinged Volvo on are the informatics, and indeed that's why I went out of my way to but a 2018 V60. My question is why on earth doesn't Volvo beta test with customers? You would only need maybe 5 people to test a the new design because they would all hate it. Then, fix it. Or, even now, fix it. It's a really stupid design.

But why doesn't CR go after some of the other companies with stupid informatics? They downrate Volvo really heavily for that but actually the rest of the car is good

I don't know - their balance is just off.
Agree...the automotive testers at CR are not really car people.

I always remember the total debacle of the Suzuki Samurai back in the day.

Also, take into consideration that anytime a new model comes out from a manufacturer there are always issues. That is why I tend to wait a few years if I buy a new car...even if it is a Toyota or Lexus.
 
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You forget something, if a customer keeps coming in with a problem, that monopolizes their tech's time. It's not in the techs best interest to see this customer and and over until finally "deciding to fix the problem". It wastes the dealer's time, occupies the tech with one job, preventing him from working on others, and pisses off the customer.
You also forgot something...Volvo isn't a mainstream brand.
They are a niche product for a small subset of the market.
Most Canadian cities do not have a Volvo dealership (since the late 1900's), nor a certified repair/service facility.
Cities that do have one, have techs who have more than enough time to spend diagnosing problems with shoddy engineered systems (while pampering their owners in the service waiting area and showroom).

Volvo doesn't care about "pissing off" the customer. They know there's an endless stream of customers who are looking for a "different" motoring experience from the other European brands.
 

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You also forgot something...Volvo isn't a mainstream brand.
They are a niche product for a small subset of the market.
Most Canadian cities do not have a Volvo dealership (since the late 1900's), nor a certified repair/service facility.
Cities that do have one, have techs who have more than enough time to spend diagnosing problems with shoddy engineered systems (while pampering their owners in the service waiting area and showroom).

Volvo doesn't care about "pissing off" the customer. They know there's an endless stream of customers who are looking for a "different" motoring experience from the other European brands.
Broad assumptions. Volvo dealers, like most brands, are independently owned and operated franchises. Experience can vary significantly from one dealer to the next.

Volvo is a business, like all automakers. You can tey another dealer if unhappy. Now if you have a big issue and reach out to corporate and get screwed then you can use Volvo in a broad term. As you can do with design and engineering issues.
 

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Volvo used to be the absolute tops for quality of build, safety, etc. No more. Times changed. Other makers caught up on the safety thing and quality because they were forced to by the government and the market.
And now Volvos are very expensive cars. Also, being owned by a Chinese company can't be helping them on perception of quality.
I'm 71 years old and have a 2007 XC70 with "only" 110,000 miles. Should I get to where I need a replacement, it will definitely NOT be a Volvo. In my neck of the woods Volvo was the most ubiquitous car on the street (240, 740, 940, XC70). It has been supplanted by Subarus.
 

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Volvo used to be the absolute tops for quality of build, safety, etc. No more. Times changed. Other makers caught up on the safety thing and quality because they were forced to by the government and the market.
And now Volvos are very expensive cars. Also, being owned by a Chinese company can't be helping them on perception of quality.
I'm 71 years old and have a 2007 XC70 with "only" 110,000 miles. Should I get to where I need a replacement, it will definitely NOT be a Volvo. In my neck of the woods Volvo was the most ubiquitous car on the street (240, 740, 940, XC70). It has been supplanted by Subarus.
Other manufacturers cheat and build to the test. Volvo's safety remains unparalleled. Volvo's reliability, not so much
 

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At the end of it, you are left with a vehicle that isn't much safer than the competition, is less reliable yet commands a premium.
o_O
My Personal experience is that Volvos are expensive to maintain. We don't know if price / cost or unreliability results in a low CR reports score. They haven't released the survey questions or what parts are more likely to fail on a given brand and model.

Without this information, it's hard to make an educated and informed decision on whether the brand is actually unreliable or just costly to maintain. As you would expect BMW, Audi, Mercedes and other European Brands to fall into that pricey category when parts break.
 

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I don’t know, maybe I’m lucky, but I’m on my 5th Volvo and I’d characterize them as reliable. My first was a 1998 C70 coupe. While I won’t say they were as reliable as some of the basic Japanese cars that I’ve owned, either prior to 1998 or later, they have all been much better vehicles in almost every way and the cars we always drove when we had a choice. I don’t regret any of them.


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Lots of interesting replies and experiences on this topic. I have accepted (and experienced) a world where everything is subject to fail or operate improperly. Remember your cell phone, PC, wi fi router, fancy refrigerator, simple appliance with a microprocessor....etc. They all quit working well before their expiration date. But we soldier on, buying the next generation of complicated products.

I bought my Volvos because I wanted them. Just like the comfortable shoes I have that won't outlast a pair of cowboy boots. I don't care. It's want I want so I'm happy. Buy what makes you happy. Simple = reliable...but boring.
 

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I don’t know, maybe I’m lucky, but I’m on my 5th Volvo and I’d characterize them as reliable. My first was a 1998 C70 coupe. While I won’t say they were as reliable as some of the basic Japanese cars that I’ve owned, either prior to 1998 or later, they have all been much better vehicles in almost every way and the cars we always drove when we had a choice. I don’t regret any of them.


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I agree. Volvo's are beautiful cars, and that's why I bought my XC60.

Out of curiosity, what MYs/models did you own, and for how long? Have you noticed a difference in quality and reliability over the years?
 

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I think this is right. It may be why Toyota/Lexus is on top. They are intentionally late out of the gate, to do their own engineering....and also learn from others' experience....and failures.

I just love my 2006 V8 Ocean Race XC90...just a unique work of art and impressive piece of machinery with that Yamaha V8. But my 2010 Lexus GX460 is in another league entirely. It's like driving a bank vault down the road....in both a good way...and a bad way.

I was thinking of getting a 2016+ XC90, but was put off by reliability issues, electronics, complex powerplant, leaking sunroof, etc. They are works of art....but technology....not si much.. I decided to try the Lexus GX460 instead. I test drove a 2018 and a 2010 GX460....and almost couldn't tell difference! I like the old 2010 GX grille/body style better. So I bought that....and saved $25,000....

I would get in the 2010 GX460 and drive it across the country tomorrow. The 2006 XC90, I would not. About same mileage, (140,000 +-) on each

I also have a 2017 Ford F150 for work,, with their twin turbo V6 3.5 Ecoboost, which was not particularly new then, but has been a complete fiasco with that engine, among other items. For example, Ford can't make a door latch that works when it's below freezing, but can still sell a million trucks a year. So I guess they don't have to.

For 2022, Toyota has just now implemented a similar V6 twin turbo in its Tundra to replace the V8. I'm hoping it will be in another league entirely than F150 and will dump the F150 for a Tundra when market cools a bit.

First mover advantage may not apply to auto manufacturers.....

View attachment 139586
Beautiful car!
 

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I agree. Volvo's are beautiful cars, and that's why I bought my XC60.

Out of curiosity, what MYs/models did you own, and for how long? Have you noticed a difference in quality and reliability over the years?
A 1998 C70 coupe, bought it new and kept it until 2018 when it had ~150k miles. A 2007 S80 that we kept until 2016. A 2017 XC90 that we still have, a 2019 S60 that that we just traded in for a 2022 S60. No, I do not notice a difference in reliability or quality. They’ve all been reasonably reliable, albeit never as trouble free as some of my Japanese cars. But none of my Japanese cars, ever felt nearly as high quality wrt the interiors. I’ve owned BMW, Acura, Honda, Nissan, Toyota and Subaru…None of them had seats or audio systems that could compare with my Volvo’s and those are huge priorities for me as we take long trips as a matter of routine.

Happy Thanksgiving!!!


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Seeing that you're in Canada from your profile, where did you get that offer from? From what I know, 4yrs/250k km is the max extended warranty you can get here.
It was a CPO and maybe that's the difference. It was offered by Unionville volvo in Ontario. I added 4 additional years, on top of the 6 year CPO warranty for a total of 10 years from the initial in-service date. The mileage wasn't unlimited and we picked 160K as we drive about 10-15k per year. The car was exactly 2 years old and 10K km at the time of purchase, which gives me 8 years and 150K warranty under our ownership.
 
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