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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So i've read multiple reviews online and such and even on swedespeed. My mechanic told me I have another few months left on my clutch and I will be moving to a newer S40/V50 or a C30 T5 by October. I am replacing the clutch before then, but I know I need a new clutch disc, pressure plate and flywheel and a few bolts. Is there anything else I'm missing? my master mechanic told me I also need to replace the bleeder valve? And I am tied on the fence of a dual mass/single mass flywheel.. single mass makes your car sound like a diesel? Anyone mind shedding their exp on both/advise?


Also how difficult of a job is this by yourself? I have done a PCV and other small suspesion jobs but I DO have 2 stage lift.


Thanks!
 

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On this forum, (I think) you may be one of the first people to install a clutch. You didn't specify if you had the m66 or m56 or any engine mods, but I would stick with oem unless there was a performance (holding) reason. In this case I believe sachs is the OEM manufactorer.
 

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Turbo or 2.4i? Bleeder valve/slave cylinder/throwout bearing. Yes, you need one.
If you are just selling the car in a few months I'd skip the flywheel (maybe the whole job). :)
You'll need a special tool to reset the dual mass however.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Meh I think if I've done a PCV I could tackle a clutch ;) I have a m56 2.4i. Well it's going to a family member so I should do it before it goes!

So I'd need the Clutch Kit (Includes Clutch Disc / Pressure plate)
Bleeder Valve
Slave Cylinder
Throwout bearing
Flywheel
Am I missing anything? Thats what I'm on the bridge of.. I am told a single mass gets rid of all your noise absorption and your car sounds like a diesel lol.
 

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Meh I think if I've done a PCV I could tackle a clutch ;) I have a m56 2.4i. Well it's going to a family member so I should do it before it goes!

So I'd need the Clutch Kit (Includes Clutch Disc / Pressure plate)
Bleeder Valve
Slave Cylinder
Throwout bearing
Flywheel
OK, 2.4i makes things much easier.
Bleeder Valve, Slave Cylinder, Throwout bearing
These are all one item. We do have a "vent pipe" that you could replace as well. It's updated on the M66, might be a good idea on the 2.4i also. Refer to the parts here.
The flywheel parts are here. You'll want to replace the flywheel bolts. The good news if you buy a new flywheeel is that it's pre-set so you will not need the special tool.
 

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My mechanic told me I have another few months left on my clutch
Did he give you any more information than that? Is it worn, loose, leaking, what? It's a pretty big job, and there is an argument for leaving it until something actually goes. Just wondering.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Didn't give me much info, said it feels like it's beginning to slip.
I'd rather hit it before it stops biting rather then having to tow it somewhere!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So I basically need all the parts in both guides? Oh yeah I knew about the flywheel bolts. My brother told me about that.

Now I just want somebodys opinion on single mass vs dual mass
 

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Now I just want somebodys opinion on single mass vs dual mass
If it's going to a family member, I'd strongly suggest stock dual-mass. Single mass is going to be harsher, and with next to no advantage on anything but a highly tuned high-rpm scenario.
 

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So I basically need all the parts in both guides? Oh yeah I knew about the flywheel bolts. My brother told me about that.

Now I just want somebodys opinion on single mass vs dual mass
Get the stock DMF, it's more comfortable. I wouldn't say it'd sound like a diesel but it would run rougher for sure.

I did the job myself a month ago, it's really not that hard and just a lot of work. I have a diesel with MMT6 transaxle, but won't be very different as the bit after the crankshaft is the same stuff. There isn't actually anything to set on a DMF, it's two big spinning discs of metal with springs in between, I think people mean the clutch but as you'll be replacing everything that'll just automatically set itself too. You don't actually need special tools at all (apart from some big torx sockets, T30, T40 and T50) if you know what you are doing. If you don't, use the specialized tools.

Undoing things:
  • Undo wheels
  • Lift car
  • Take off wheels
  • Remove skidplate
  • Remove LCAs (replace if necessary) for space. You CAN do this with them in place, but you'll need to undo them from the hub regardless.
  • Drain gearbox. It's the bottom torx bolt on the wheelside.
  • Remove driveshafts
  • (flip car around)
  • Remove airbox
  • Remove gearbox ancilliaries (shifting mechanism, a ground, some wires and the clutch hose, this leaks obviously)
  • SUPPORT ENGINE (preferably with a hoist, but you can just put a support under it, I did).
  • Remove engine/gearbox supports and replace if necessary. There's an odd plate at the bottom mount that you need to take off, I couldn't really figure out how to so I ended up modifying it a bit.
  • (engine is now only supported by 1 remaining brace, be careful)
  • Remove gearbox bolts. Believe there's 10 on my MMT6 but don't know for M56. It won't just fall off.
  • Slide back gearbox and wiggle it out. Watch it, it's a heavy bugger and some kind of support really helps. You'll need to tilt the engine down a bit for room.
  • Undo old pressure plate.
  • Remove what's left of old clutch plate (in my case: not a lot). It should actually just fall out at this point.
  • Undo flywheel bolts. If you need to lock the crankshaft, take a metal bar and wedge it between a tooth of the starter ring and some engine bay bits. The bolts aren't that stuck at all. It won't fall either as it's slid onto the crankshaft.
  • Pull off flywheel. Watch it, seriously heavy for its size and will break stuff it lands on. Like a foot.
  • Replace old slave cylinder (on inside of bell housing). BE CAREFUL. Test and see of your new slave cylinder makes a good connection with the clutch hose/bleedvalve (and is pressure tight). Mine wasn't... ended up using the new slave cylinder with the old connecting bit. Guess when you find out it leaks if you don't check this beforehand...

Assembly:
  • Clean all the new bits with degreaser.
  • Mount new flywheel. MAKE SURE IT'S ON STRAIGHT and the starter gear is aligned correctly. Hammer it home a bit with a wooden mallet of sorts until it loses its tendency to fall off, then screw it down going back and forth, half a turn at a time. It's a very exact fit so yes it's hella tight. Torque down with the new bolts, I thought it was 50nm but I'm not quite sure anymore. Not as tight as you might think anyway. You can block it with your bit of metal again, won't hurt it (official Volvo tool does the same thing).
  • If you have a clutch alignment "tool", use that to place your new clutch plate. Make sure up is up and down is down and what not (it'll probably work both ways, but just note that the thing is actually lopsided and designed to go one way). If you don't have an alignment tool, make one out of a 1/2" ratchet extender with some tape wrapped around it (for a good fit) to center the plate. If you don't center it, the gearbox will be a nightmare to get back on. I'd go so far as to say you won't be able to.
  • Place the pressure plate. Not rocket science, but you have to screw it down carefully in the same manner as the flywheel. You want to compress the springs equally so work in circles until all (new) bolts are driven home at I believe 30nm, but don't pin me down on that again.
  • The biggest faff by far is refitting the gearbox because the thing is ever so slightly too big to fit under the angle that it's got to be in. But persevere and you can't actually do much wrong so long as you make sure to mesh the clutch plate to the gearbox correctly. Don't forget to put the bolts back in. That weird ass plate connecting the exhaust to the block... I ended up brutalizing it. Wouldn't go back on, but I don't think it's very important anyway.
  • Hoist the engine back into place and place the mounts.
  • Reconnect all the ancilliaries.
  • Bleed the clutch, test for positive action.
  • Put back airbox and such.
  • Replace driveshafts
  • Replace LCAs.
  • Refill gearbox! You do not want to forget this. Takes roughly 4 quarts, well mine did. Use the "top" (it's actually in the center) torx bolt on the wheel side. It's full when it overflows. Seems a bit simpleton but that's actually how most gearboxes are designed to be topped up. You know you have the right oil if it smells of rotten egg lol.
  • Put back the wheels and skidplate.
  • Retorque the wheels with the car on the ground.

That should do it, it's really not as hard as you might think. Just a whoooole lot of work. And crap that's a longer explanation than I was planning to give :p
 
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