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The local dealer has had my car for 6 wks and still have no clue what's wrong with it. I should....

  • Chill out bro, they're surely working hard on your ride and you have a perfectly nice loaner to use

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  • Get on the phone with Gothenburg and get some answers

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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I purchased a 2018 V90CC with 30k miles on 7/19/21 and enjoyed the bejeezus out of it for 2.5 weeks before taking it to the local dealer. I took it in to fix (under warranty) an HVAC issue where the A/C blows hot unless set to "LO"(in which case it blows perfectly cold air). I took it to the dealer on 8/5/21 and haven't seen it since. They squabbled for the first two weeks about who was going to pay for the work (another dealer had done work on the HVAC previously) and for the last four weeks it has been a frustrating series of calls where they give me variations of "we don't know what's wrong with it and are troubleshooting with Volvo." Now they gave me a 2021 XC90 loaner that I've had the entire time so know I can't complain too much, but 6 weeks in the shop for an HVAC issue? That seems insane to me. They tell me they've tried replacing the compressor and checked the cabin temperature sensor and neither of those solved the problem. At this point I don't really have trust in anything they're telling me. So I have two questions: 1) Have any of you dealt with an issue like this and found a solution? 2) Should I just chill out and enjoy the free miles on the loaner vehicle as long as I have it, or start ramping up efforts (BBB, VOLVO Corporate, etc) to try to get them to get this thing sorted out?
 

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I would just escalate it Volvo corporate for now. Talk to the customer service line, see if they can give you a longer extended warranty. Also there is a tsb for adding a resistor to the HVAC to force it to keep blowing cold. Someone else can link that.

Sent from my GM1917 using Tapatalk
 
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I think chilling out is step one. Lots of issues that aren't normal do take time to get resolution on. Is the car certified? It would be under warranty if it is, so Volvo would pay for it regardless, so that is a bit odd that they would not know who was paying for it. If it's not certified then youd sorta be on your own. What is the year, miles, and certification status of your car?

Just thinking through it... I would have suspected either the interior or exterior temp sensor. If the car doesn't know what temp it is then it doesn't know the compressor should be on... but "LO" would send a signal to the car to have the compressor clutch engaged regardless. My 06 Volvo has a sometimes faulty temp sensor (I think it's a bad wire), and when it thinks the exterior temp is 50 degrees off I can't use the climate control.

But I'm not sure why you can't trust them... they are going by the book and doing whatever Volvo is telling them to try next.
 
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I purchased a 2018 V90CC with 30k miles on 7/19/21 and enjoyed the bejeezus out of it for 2.5 weeks before taking it to the local dealer.

I took it in to fix (under warranty) an HVAC issue where the A/C blows hot unless set to "LO"(in which case it blows perfectly cold air).

I took it to the dealer on 8/5/21 and haven't seen it since.

Should I just chill out and enjoy the free miles on the loaner vehicle as long as I have it,
Did you purchase this car from a Volvo dealer? If not now you know why the car was for sale. If you did purchase it from a Volvo dealer - RETURN IT. If not it's buyer beware and be happy you have a free nice replacement vehicle while someone attempts to figure out what's going on. There are cars that can't be fixed - so just be prepared for that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I think chilling out is step one. Lots of issues that aren't normal do take time to get resolution on. Is the car certified? It would be under warranty if it is, so Volvo would pay for it regardless, so that is a bit odd that they would not know who was paying for it. If it's not certified then youd sorta be on your own. What is the year, miles, and certification status of your car?

Just thinking through it... I would have suspected either the interior or exterior temp sensor. If the car doesn't know what temp it is then it doesn't know the compressor should be on... but "LO" would send a signal to the car to have the compressor clutch engaged regardless. My 06 Volvo has a sometimes faulty temp sensor (I think it's a bad wire), and when it thinks the exterior temp is 50 degrees off I can't use the climate control.

But I'm not sure why you can't trust them... they are going by the book and doing whatever Volvo is telling them to try next.
Thanks for the feedback DFrantz. If the car wasn't so new to me, I probably wouldn't care as much when they got it back to me, but I put a lot of time into finding the right V90CC and was excited to finally have it. I will try to chill out and let them do their job, but I also can't really understand how any testing procedure could take 4 weeks with no answers. It's not like they can't replicate the problem or that it's intermittent. It does the same thing every time. I absolutely thought one of the temp sensors would be the culprit, either faulty or bad connection or something, but they assure me that's not the case. The part where I lose trust is in their inability to get me an answer which makes me question how capable they are or whether they're really spending much of their day working on it. I understand that electronic systems can be tricky, but I am curious how many wires/relays/sensors/control units are ultimately involved in turning the A/C on and off? On second thought, maybe I don't want to know the answer to that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Did you purchase this car from a Volvo dealer? If not now you know why the car was for sale. If you did purchase it from a Volvo dealer - RETURN IT. If not it's buyer beware and be happy you have a free nice replacement vehicle while someone attempts to figure out what's going on. There are cars that can't be fixed - so just be prepared for that.
No, I bought it from a BMW dealer and I've definitely added further temp setting checks to my pre-purchase check list. I verified that it was blowing really cold when I test drove the car (because it was set to LO), but didn't think to try changing the temp setting until I was driving it home. Lesson learned on that one. I wasn't overly concerned though since the car is still under warranty, but like mentioned, some cars can't be fixed in which case the warranty won't do me a whole lot of good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I would just escalate it Volvo corporate for now. Talk to the customer service line, see if they can give you a longer extended warranty. Also there is a tsb for adding a resistor to the HVAC to force it to keep blowing cold. Someone else can link that.

Sent from my GM1917 using Tapatalk
Thanks Kartboy. I'll look for that TSB.
 

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Not a CPO from Volvo. Could be out of the 4 year new car warranty. Suggest contacting Volvo Corp b4 too much time passes.
 

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I always recommend only buying CPO for late model purchases. BMWs from BMW dealers, Volvos from Volvo dealers.

It's frustraighting 100% but with a modern car when it gets to a point of "we can't figure it out and are escalating it to corporate" then it can be a long process. Volvo will likely have an engineer on the job and at that point, the dealer is fully stuck until the Volvo team tells them the next step. The challenge is, as you partially addressed, "who's paying for it?" Diag time is a HUGE expense. So its not that you're a less important customer than someone else, it's that no one wants to pay for the labor charge of diag time. Repairs under warranty are billed out by the job. So if they have done all the diag per the book, there is nothing to charge to the warranty company for additional diag work. It's not different than your health insurance pushing back on additional tests. Is the car still under factory warranty? Who did the previous repairs? Does the car have any warranty on it at all?

Volvo tends to be really good with customer care, but folks who buy new and buy CPO def get preference for any out of warranty good will programs.

Personally with AC issues in the past, and an AC issue now I would be a little nervous. I would at least consider trading it in if the opportunity presents itself. Losing a little now might save you a bunch later. I love the V90s and V60s so I really hope whatever happens you're able to become another Volvo die hard!
 
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I know that most folks only post when they're having issues but there seem to be quite a few A/C issue posts with this model.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Not a CPO from Volvo. Could be out of the 4 year new car warranty. Suggest contacting Volvo Corp b4 too much time passes.
It’s actually covered by warranty until June 2022 so at least I’m good there (provided they fix it before then).
 

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Was Volvo not the ones that fixed it the first time? That part still doesn't make sense to me. Why would it matter who fixed it before unless it wasn't a Volvo dealer.
 
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OP said the car is under warranty, which I presume would be the new car warranty given the age and mileage of the car. So unless something nefarious was done to the car, it should be on Volvo’s dime, right?
 

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I know that most folks only post when they're having issues but there seem to be quite a few A/C issue posts with this model.
Agree that, over the years, for older models, there are a lot of posts concerning AC. However, I just did a quick scan of the most recent posts, and it looked to me like a fair amount of the posts were for older models.

Prior to factory ordering my 2020 V90 Inscription T6, I did a deep dive to determine if/where repetitive problems existed. From what I recall, AC issues didn't really stand out. I did my research between 11/2019 and 2/2020.

Overall, based on my research, mechanical issues on the newer Volvos didn't appear to be significant. Since purchase, my V90 has been reliable.

Concerning OP, as DFrantz said, I would also trade the car in at a Volvo dealer and purchase a Volvo CPO, if still interested in a Volvo.
 

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@maggs and @DFrantz, is the trade in necessary if the car is still under the new car warranty as OP has stated? Would not the better solution be to purchase a VIP vehicle service contract from a Volvo retailer for long term piece of mind? To me, the only reason to trade out of the vehicle would be for a loss of confidence.
 

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@maggs and @DFrantz, is the trade in necessary if the car is still under the new car warranty as OP has stated? Would not the better solution be to purchase a VIP vehicle service contract from a Volvo retailer for long term piece of mind? To me, the only reason to trade out of the vehicle would be for a loss of confidence.
Assuming OP still wants a Volvo, IMO, the better option is to trade the car at a Volvo dealer while the car is still under warranty, since this helps with the car's value. My guess is that a VIP for this car, for coverage comparable to CPO, might cost $4k or more.

There are too many unknowns about this car. Did OP have his car inspected by his own mechanic prior to purchase, our just rely on the BMW dealer? What kind of inspection did the BMW conduct prior to selling the car, and what repairs, if any, were made? Did the BMW dealer sell the car as-is or provide some type of short term purchase guarantee? Was the car flood damaged prior to purchase? Is the current, difficult to determine problem, an indication of other electrical problems with the car?

Sometimes it's better to cut bait, rather than continue fishing and hoping for the best. Without having answers to these questions, and noting OP's finances, it's difficult to determine the best keep or sell solution. This is up to OP, but, in my case, I would sell the car.
 

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Selling to another source like Carvana (or Vroom, Carmax, etc, etc.) based on my personal experience three times this Summer will yield the most proceeds.

The only reason I'd trade it to a Volvo (or other) dealer would be if their price was close, I was buying a car from them, and I was only paying tax on the difference ("the taxable difference").

The used car market is pretty fluid right now so all of this is subject to change. From car to car, sometimes Carvana is more competitive, sometimes Carmax, sometimes maybe even your local dealer.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Was Volvo not the ones that fixed it the first time? That part still doesn't make sense to me. Why would it matter who fixed it before unless it wasn't a Volvo dealer.
It was a different Volvo dealer that fixed it the first time. I don't know how the internal billing works between dealerships and Volvo Corporate, but I tried to impress upon my dealer's management that this wasn't really my problem and the work should be performed and billing sorted out later. They did agree to adopt that stance and start working on my vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Selling to another source like Carvana (or Vroom, Carmax, etc, etc.) based on my personal experience three times this Summer will yield the most proceeds.

The only reason I'd trade it to a Volvo (or other) dealer would be if their price was close, I was buying a car from them, and I was only paying tax on the difference ("the taxable difference").

The used car market is pretty fluid right now so all of this is subject to change. From car to car, sometimes Carvana is more competitive, sometimes Carmax, sometimes maybe even your local dealer.
Thanks for the reply. I did sell my previous vehicle to Carmax this summer and it was pretty painless so I'll keep that in mind. I'm not ready to cut bait on this car yet though. I still have almost a year on the warranty, and as far as I know, everything else on the car works perfectly. I searched long and hard for a car that met my requirements of 2018+, Luxury package (for the purpose of body-colored cladding), and non-black interior. The fact that this one also had the B&W stereo was icing on the cake. That said, I had hoped to find a CPO vehicle, but there was a fairly limited pool of vehicles that met criteria.

I definitely get nervous with electronic gremlins in modern cars, but since this is an omni-present problem, I have some degree of confidence that they will be able to find a cause and fix it eventually. I routinely purchase used vehicles that are still within the manufacturers warranty because I'm too cheap to take the depreciation hit of a new car. I do plan to look into Volvo's extended warranty though and will revisit the idea of trading the vehicle in if problems persist beyond this particular instance.
 

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I vote option "C"
Ask them to keep the car and refund your money.
If this is how they handle a relatively new car, imagine how much hassle it'll be when you and your family are stranded on the side of the road during a family trip.
 
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