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Yep got an inductive timing light, just weird I couldn't see the light flash when spinning the crank slowly. Going to try an inline spark plug light tomorrow, I just want to be sure the timing is 100% correct before giving it another try. I'll read through the sw-em link too, thanks!
If you want to confirm that the static timing is correct before you fire the engine, the inductive timing light is not the best tool. A test light connected between the wire from the coil neg terminal to the distributor points (disconnect the coil end) and ground is a better choice. With the points closed the test light should be on. Rotate the engine until the timing marks are at 10 deg BTDC. Adjust the distributor rotation until the light goes out / points open. Tighten the distributor and check by rotating the engine one full turn and watch to confirm that the test light goes out when the timing marks hit 10 deg BTDC. Adjust if necessary.

As Scaramoucheii indicates, an inductive timing light is best used on a running engine and is excellent for making adjustments in the timing (once the engine is running) and checking the operation of the advance mechanism. Not the best tool for setting static timing on a non running engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
Guys;

Is it me...?...but this thread is all over the place!!..the title is "Car bogs down at 4500 RPMs" (which the video didn't even show!)...then carbs...now we have swapped plug wires and no spark...it's like the English Setters of threads...I don't even know where to start...well maybe I do...I suggest you get your ignition working and able to start engine...

Good Hunting!
haha, it's hard to see in the video but when the engine starts shaking its 'bogging down'. Anyway, we're back on track now :).
 

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Discussion Starter #43
If you want to confirm that the static timing is correct before you fire the engine, the inductive timing light is not the best tool. A test light connected between the wire from the coil neg terminal to the distributor points (disconnect the coil end) and ground is a better choice. With the points closed the test light should be on. Rotate the engine until the timing marks are at 10 deg BTDC. Adjust the distributor rotation until the light goes out / points open. Tighten the distributor and check by rotating the engine one full turn and watch to confirm that the test light goes out when the timing marks hit 10 deg BTDC. Adjust if necessary.

As Scaramoucheii indicates, an inductive timing light is best used on a running engine and is excellent for making adjustments in the timing (once the engine is running) and checking the operation of the advance mechanism. Not the best tool for setting static timing on a non running engine.
Cool, that's the plan today. Thanks for your patience on all this it's been a few years since I've done this stuff
 

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Discussion Starter #44
I finally decided to go with the 123 distributor like you guys recommended. Man what an upgrade. I got around to installing it today and not only did it fix the bogging down @ 4500 rpm issue but the car runs a lot smoother and quieter. Thanks for the recommendation, it was well worth the $
 
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