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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone else noticed that this car requires more brake pedal pressure to keep from moving when sitting at a red light than others? With other cars that I've driven I usually just need to rest my foot on the pedal to keep the car still. If I use the same technique with my S60 it will start to inch forward and so requires a little extra leg effort to remain still. Just curious if anyone has noticed something like this or if it just me.
 

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short answer: no
 

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If I'm not mistaken there's supposed to be a neutral at idle feature. It could be a software issue.
 

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Why? That sounds dumb.
I've had the recommendation of placing the car in neutral as a way to help prevent warping to the rotors. When remaining in drive and holding the brake pedal you can cause hot spots on the rotor which may lead to warping. Of course this is really only if you brake hard for a while (say a long down hill descent followed by a stop light) and hold the pedal without letting off. However, in regular stop and go traffic your pads and rotors should have enough time to cool properly.

Others believe this is a way to save gas though neither "reasons" are proven.

Personally, I leave it in drive, but I've just come from a manual transmission A3 so it is taking some time getting used to an automatic transmission again!
 

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If you put your car in neutral, isn't more gas spent and burnt to keep the engine idling...? You might as well shut off the engine then and DIY Start/Stop system...

Unless I drive a manual transmissions car, I don't see any reason to put the car in neutral. It's dangerous and stupid. Plus, how can a brake rotor warp if it's not even turning?
 

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If you put your car in neutral, isn't more gas spent and burnt to keep the engine idling...? You might as well shut off the engine then and DIY Start/Stop system...

Unless I drive a manual transmissions car, I don't see any reason to put the car in neutral. It's dangerous and stupid. Plus, how can a brake rotor warp if it's not even turning?
I couldn't agree more...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If you put your car in neutral, isn't more gas spent and burnt to keep the engine idling...? You might as well shut off the engine then and DIY Start/Stop system...

Unless I drive a manual transmissions car, I don't see any reason to put the car in neutral. It's dangerous and stupid. Plus, how can a brake rotor warp if it's not even turning?
Neutral or Drive at stand still is probably a wash as far as fuel consumption is concerned. In neutral the engine may idle a little higher but in drive there's more load on the engine.

Why would a rotor have to be turning to warp? A warp occurs from uneven pressures applied to a surface together with enough heat to alter the structure. Uneven heating can provide the forces necessary to warp a rotor. Having the brake pads engaged on a hot stationary rotor will provide more thermal mass to one area of the rotor. If enough heat and the caliper applies more pressure to one side than the other I can see this being a way a rotor can warp. It's also a good idea to make sure all your lug nuts are torqued to the correct value so that even pressure is applied to the surface of the rotor hub.
 

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Seems to me all that shifting in and out of gear would be hard on your transmission. But, I'm certainly no expert.
 

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Why would a rotor have to be turning to warp? A warp occurs from uneven pressures applied to a surface together with enough heat to alter the structure. Uneven heating can provide the forces necessary to warp a rotor. Having the brake pads engaged on a hot stationary rotor will provide more thermal mass to one area of the rotor. If enough heat and the caliper applies more pressure to one side than the other I can see this being a way a rotor can warp. It's also a good idea to make sure all your lug nuts are torqued to the correct value so that even pressure is applied to the surface of the rotor hub.
Well then release the pressure to just the point where your brakes are grabbing the rotors hard enough to stop the car from moving? If you're doing an emergency stop, once you come to a complete stop, don't keep so much pressure on the brakes? A good thing that we always do is to release the brake pressure a bit prior to coming to a complete stop, thus making stopping smoother. Surely it will decrease the chances of warping the rotor as well based on the given explanations.
 
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