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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I really want to add a boost gauge and air/fuel mix gauge to my car but know nothing about them. So I am looking for input before I purchase.<p>What is the pros/cons of an electronic boost gauge and mechanical one?<p>What is the difference between a narrow band and wide band air/fuel gauge?<p>What brands are good and where are the best prices?<p>
 

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Re: Boost gauges mech vs elec & Air/Fuel narrow vs wide (x-omatic)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>x-omatic</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">I really want to add a boost gauge and air/fuel mix gauge to my car but know nothing about them. So I am looking for input before I purchase.<p>What is the pros/cons of an electronic boost gauge and mechanical one?<p>What is the difference between a narrow band and wide band air/fuel gauge?<p>What brands are good and where are the best prices?<p></TD></TR></TABLE><br>Electrical boost gauges are generally accepted to be the most precise as they calibrate themselves before each use and normally in a really cool "fanfare" opening sweep. Mechanical gauges are still more than fine, but you must run a plastic tube all the way from the engine bay to the gauge. Also, from personal experience my mechanical gauge made noises that made them seem kinda cheap.<p>Narrow band o2 gauges are basically good for a light show. They use a very weak signal coming from a tapped o2 sensor so it is only good for 14.5-15 AFR, no good for tuning except for your idle. See below:<br><IMG SRC="http://www.plxdevices.com/M-Series-Controllers/NarrowbandOutputGraph.jpg" BORDER="0"><p>Wideband o2 sensors generally have their own o2 sensor and have a linear output.<br><IMG SRC="http://justskylines.com/skyline/knowledgebase/images/turbo/airfuel/widebando2.jpg" BORDER="0"><p>Personally, I would say just run an EGT gauge. You will never need wideband o2 on a daily basis but simply to tune the car. Therefore, it almost becomes as annoying as the narrowband. EGT will monitor exhaust temps to make sure things don't get too hot.
 

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Re: Boost gauges mech vs elec & Air/Fuel narrow vs wide (BtownVolvo)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>BtownVolvo</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote"><br>Electrical boost gauges are generally accepted to be the most precise as they calibrate themselves before each use and normally in a really cool "fanfare" opening sweep. Mechanical gauges are still more than fine, but you must run a plastic tube all the way from the engine bay to the gauge. Also, from personal experience my mechanical gauge made noises that made them seem kinda cheap.<p>Narrow band o2 gauges are basically good for a light show. They use a very weak signal coming from a tapped o2 sensor so it is only good for 14.5-15 AFR, no good for tuning except for your idle. See below:<br><IMG SRC="http://www.plxdevices.com/M-Series-Controllers/NarrowbandOutputGraph.jpg" BORDER="0"><p>Wideband o2 sensors generally have their own o2 sensor and have a linear output.<br><IMG SRC="http://justskylines.com/skyline/knowledgebase/images/turbo/airfuel/widebando2.jpg" BORDER="0"><p>Personally, I would say just run an EGT gauge. You will never need wideband o2 on a daily basis but simply to tune the car. Therefore, it almost becomes as annoying as the narrowband. EGT will monitor exhaust temps to make sure things don't get too hot.</TD></TR></TABLE><p>Good info! Thanks!<br>Is EGT exhaust temp?<br>I have an extra bung plug in my downpipe. So I can use it for either air/fuel or exhaust temp?<p>
 

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<A HREF="http://volvospeed.com/Mods/egt.htm" TARGET="_blank">http://volvospeed.com/Mods/egt.htm</A><p>Yes. EGT monitors exhaust gas temperature. Both instruments are more accurate the closer you get to the exhaust housing. In the picture in the link above, he tapped the exhaust housing with that silver probe in the center.<BR><BR>
<i>Modified by BtownVolvo at 9:22 AM 4-4-2009</i>
 

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I personally prefer electrical gauges but, there is some lag involved.<p>Example: <p><A HREF="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAix5Mpk-mo" TARGET="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAix5Mpk-mo</A><br>
 

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Re: Boost gauges mech vs elec & Air/Fuel narrow vs wide (x-omatic)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>x-omatic</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">What is the difference between a narrow band and wide band air/fuel gauge?</TD></TR></TABLE><br>As shown above, a narrow-band only tells you if the engine is rich or lean, it's basically an on/off indicator. There's a narrow-band sensor mounted on the cat. The ECU uses it mainly as a monitor that everything else is working ok.<p>A wide-band gives a steady ramp across the expected a/f range. There's a wide-band sensor mounted at the top of the downpipe. It gives an accurate mixture reading for any operational situation.<p>Why do you want these numbers? Have you made a major modification to the fuel system? What will you do if they're not what you expect?<p>Tom.
 

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Re: Boost gauges mech vs elec & Air/Fuel narrow vs wide (tmtalpey)

Stay away from electric boost gauges unless you can find one as fast as a mechanical. <p>The way the gauge responds to your throttle can tell you more then the absolute value with respect to restricted intake, exhaust or sticky boost control.<p>
 

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Re: Boost gauges mech vs elec & Air/Fuel narrow vs wide (tmtalpey)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>tmtalpey</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote"><br>As shown above, a narrow-band only tells you if the engine is rich or lean, it's basically an on/off indicator. There's a narrow-band sensor mounted on the cat. The ECU uses it mainly as a monitor that everything else is working ok.<p>A wide-band gives a steady ramp across the expected a/f range. There's a wide-band sensor mounted at the top of the downpipe. It gives an accurate mixture reading for any operational situation.<p>Why do you want these numbers? Have you made a major modification to the fuel system? What will you do if they're not what you expect?<p>Tom.</TD></TR></TABLE><p>I am going to have 2 pods so I figured the best choices were boost and air/fuel. What would you recommend?
 
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