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Yes, I know that the ECU adapts to the driver's 'style', and picks a shifting program most appropriate to the driver. In my Audi it did the same thing, and in fact many people claim the ECU adapts many of the performance enhancements away even if chipped (we audi folks call it maladaptation)<P>In my S40, I have been driving really light during break-in. Well, I hit 1000 miles and decided to open it up. Hitting the gas, at about 80% of WOT, I had a great run from 1st to 4000 RPMs, then 2nd must have some kind of really short gearing since it went from 3500RPM to 4000RPMs in about 1/4 second, then it went into third to use the powerband from 2500 to 4000.<P>I'm hoping that 2nd gear's unusually short use of the power band is a maladaptation since I was taking it so easy during the break-in. Does everyone notice 2nd is short, or will that get fixed once the computer adapts to my driving habits?<P>btw, I have a 5-spd 2001. i sometimes wonder if volvo intentionally tuned down 2nd when switching from the 4-spd to the 5-spd.<P><p>[This message has been edited by joe_flies (edited 02-12-2001).]
 

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Adaptive Transmission Control systems recognizes individual styles of driving like aggressive vs. relaxed, and adapts transmission shift parameters accordingly. The two main types of Adaptive Transmission Control are adaptive shift-scheduling and adaptive shift-quality control. Adaptive shift scheduling uses information to assess driving style and decides when to upshift or downshift. It also can identify uphill or downhill gradients and recognize hard cornering as well. This was previously called "GradeLogic" by some manufacturers. Adaptive shift-quality control uses information about the vehicle or environment, such as changes in the transmission due to wear, to improve the quality of shifts. This system can also adjust shift smoothness to suit driving style.<P>Adaptive Shift Scheduling uses a microprocessor to read signals from various sensors such as the throttle position sensor, vehicle speed sensor, brake pedal sensor, steering wheel angle sensor, and engine speed sensor. It uses a complex algorithm and ongoing memory to decide when to shift. For example, high lateral acceleration during cornering may prevent shifting even if the accelerator is suddenly depressed or released. This helps avoid potential loss of tire grip due to load reversal. Shift points can be based on calibration curves in memory. Adaptive shift-quality control adjusts parameters that affect the speed and smoothness of the shift by interpreting data, including driveline feedback, from various sensors. I hope this helps!<P>-Drew<p>[This message has been edited by InDy (edited 02-13-2001).]
 
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