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Have a few trips up to the mountains planned over next few months, and if the snow comes down (thank you El Nino) I'll need more than the AWD - especially for the campsite we'll be visiting. Does anybody have experience with these wheels & chains. Bonus (stupid) question - should you do chains on all 4 wheels since AWD?
 

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Definitely Check the owners manual first and see if it even accepts them. Many modern AWD cars seem to not allow for the addition of chains, and advise owners to run snow and ice specific tires or socks in lieu of them.

Beyond that I'm also a little bit confused. If your talking snow camping in the mountains with a vehicle on Forest roads that might require chains, it seems to me the RD w/ 19s might not be the most practical choice due to its low ground clearance and slim tire-to-rim ratio.
 

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Beyond that I'm also a little bit confused. If your talking snow camping in the mountains with a vehicle on Forest roads that might require chains, it seems to me the RD w/ 19s might not be the most practical choice due to its low ground clearance and slim tire-to-rim ratio.
He will be OK so as long as the roads are plowed. Even on a road with about 4" or 5" of snow/slush, he will be fine.
 

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Grecian...I'm talking about Big Bear and a nearby camp site. This is one of the V60's you had ordered for the SoCal stores. Are you saying I should be fine with these tires in snow even without chains? Do these cars "allow" chains, and if so is it all 4 tires?
 

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Stomp, my assumption was that you were talking about forest service access roads which would not be plowed/well maintained in the winter not just mountain paved roads. My apologies if that isn't the case.
 

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On my 2012 S60 T5 with 235/40/18 tires, I was successful in using Peerless Super Z-6 cable chains. They're super easy to put on and take off and I didn't have any problems with them during christmas in big bear. Here is the link: ttp://www.peerlesschain.com/tire-chain-finder/traction/tirechains/662

I'm sure the hardcore volvo guys will recommend you buy spiderspikes chains for the "low clearance" application. Something to consider though, if you are thinking about these spiderspikes, save your money and buy a good set of winter tires for the same price.
 

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Grecian...I'm talking about Big Bear and a nearby camp site. This is one of the V60's you had ordered for the SoCal stores. Are you saying I should be fine with these tires in snow even without chains? Do these cars "allow" chains, and if so is it all 4 tires?
Yes, very familiar with the Big Bear roads and SOME of its camping sites. You, absolutely, should not go up there (if snow fall is projected) without chains or switching to a good set of all seasons. You have summer tires and they are not suitable for driving on snowy roads.

If you are going to use snow chains, please use them ONLY ON THE FRONT WHEELS. It is absolutely essential that you do not use chains in the rear wheels. You should also use single-side chains, only, as strapped-on chains can interfere with either your suspension and/or brakes.

I am really not a fan of snow chains; they limit the driving experience since you should not be driving over 40 mph, hitting a pothole or a bump on the road could dislodge them, etc. If driving to the mountains, in the winter, is a regular occurrence for you, I would invest either on a set of 19" all seasons or winter tires, or a set of 18" wheels shod with all season or winter tires.
 

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On an AWD car.. all wheels, tires.. must be the same. If it does allow for chains, they must be on all 4's
Absolutely DO NOT use chains on all four wheels, especially if the car is AWD. I believe it is also stated on your owner's manual.

If you are going to use snow or studded tires, then you should definitely use them on all four wheels.
 

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Yes, very familiar with the Big Bear roads and SOME of its camping sites. You, absolutely, should not go up there (if snow fall is projected) without chains or switching to a good set of all seasons. You have summer tires and they are not suitable for driving on snowy roads.

If you are going to use snow chains, please use them ONLY ON THE FRONT WHEELS. It is absolutely essential that you do not use chains in the rear wheels. You should also use single-side chains, only, as strapped-on chains can interfere with either your suspension and/or brakes.

I am really not a fan of snow chains; they limit the driving experience since you should not be driving over 40 mph, hitting a pothole or a bump on the road could dislodge them, etc. If driving to the mountains, in the winter, is a regular occurrence for you, I would invest either on a set of 19" all seasons or winter tires, or a set of 18" wheels shod with all season or winter tires.
I don't know the story down there, but up in NorCal a lot of the mountain roads require snow chains as in you are not allowed on them without them in certain conditions. This unfortunately makes the P* unable to go there as chains cannot go on it. You can only put on Michelin Easy Grips which are not approved by CA DOT.

All Seasons are really useless when it comes to snow. Yes they are better than summer tires because they can handle the changes in temp better, but they are not made to handle any build up of snow, like you would find in the mountains. You can tell who has All Seasons on when you drive in storms...they're on the side of the road.;)
 

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I don't know the story down there, but up in NorCal a lot of the mountain roads require snow chains as in you are not allowed on them without them in certain conditions. This unfortunately makes the P* unable to go there as chains cannot go on it. You can only put on Michelin Easy Grips which are not approved by CA DOT.
If you have ALL SEASON tires (and most are labeled M+S) plus AWD you can go through the "snow chain blockade"; I know I have... (Big Bear, Idyllwild, Mt. San Jacinto, Lake Arrowhead, etc.)

All Seasons are really useless when it comes to snow. Yes they are better than summer tires because they can handle the changes in temp better, but they are not made to handle any build up of snow, like you would find in the mountains. You can tell who has All Seasons on when you drive in storms...they're on the side of the road.;)
I am sorry but I will disagree with the former part of your sentence. I will agree with your insinuation that dedicated winter tires are the absolute best choice. With a quality ALL-SEASON, you can go up in the mountains; you just need to be cognizant of conditions like you should be no matter what kind of tires your car has.

Regarding the latter part, it has become apparent to me in the past 3.5 years that I have lived in California, that the overwhelming majority of Californians are just not adept to drive well in rain and even more so in snow. Even those who go up to the mountains a few times per year. There are exceptions, of course, and the transplants from Midwest/Northeast who have had a ton of hands-on experience in driving under such conditions. In a similar statement to yours, when I go out in the rain or up in the mountains, I can tell who the native Californian drivers are. ;)
 

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If you have ALL SEASON tires (and most are labeled M+S) plus AWD you can go through the "snow chain blockade"; I know I have... (Big Bear, Idyllwild, Mt. San Jacinto, Lake Arrowhead, etc.)
What's funny is that the P* manual has a part in big bold letter saying All Seasons are "NOT ALLOWED" on the car. Obviously we already have owners running All Seasons on them in areas that get cold but no snow because that is nonsense. People in areas with snow are still going the winter tire route.

I am sorry but I will disagree with the former part of your sentence. I will agree with your insinuation that dedicated winter tires are the absolute best choice. With a quality ALL-SEASON, you can go up in the mountains; you just need to be cognizant of conditions like you should be no matter what kind of tires your car has.

Regarding the latter part, it has become apparent to me in the past 3.5 years that I have lived in California, that the overwhelming majority of Californians are just not adept to drive well in rain and even more so in snow. Even those who go up to the mountains a few times per year. There are exceptions, of course, and the transplants from Midwest/Northeast who have had a ton of hands-on experience in driving under such conditions. In a similar statement to yours, when I go out in the rain or up in the mountains, I can tell who the native Californian drivers are. ;)
I agree that driving style will play as much a role as the tire. I'm from NY(LI), went to school in Buffalo, so I have unfortunately seen my share of winter driving and then some. In my 10 years on this coast I have found that CA drivers, with some exceptions, are just not adept at driving, period. Drivers on this coast just seem to be unaware of their surroundings as if they are driving in a bubble. I think east coast roads are so much narrower and more congested that people have to be constantly aware of impending doom. Unfortunately this extra awareness leads east coasters to be overly confident, so they do drive much more aggressively.
 

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What's funny is that the P* manual has a part in big bold letter saying All Seasons are "NOT ALLOWED" on the car. Obviously we already have owners running All Seasons on them in areas that get cold but no snow because that is nonsense. People in areas with snow are still going the winter tire route.
My posts, above, were addressing specifically a non-Polestar vehicle. I understand the direction of the Polestar team re: no all-season tires.

I agree that driving style will play as much a role as the tire. I'm from NY(LI), went to school in Buffalo, so I have unfortunately seen my share of winter driving and then some. In my 10 years on this coast I have found that CA drivers, with some exceptions, are just not adept at driving, period. Drivers on this coast just seem to be unaware of their surroundings as if they are driving in a bubble. I think east coast roads are so much narrower and more congested that people have to be constantly aware of impending doom. Unfortunately this extra awareness leads east coasters to be overly confident, so they do drive much more aggressively.
People here are better drivers at speed; people on the East Coast are better with navigating (as you wrote) narrower roads and also have better "instincts" in dense traffic conditions. Every area has its own idiosyncrasies. I definitely enjoy driving better here on the West Coast, though.
 

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My posts, above, were addressing specifically a non-Polestar vehicle. I understand the direction of the Polestar team re: no all-season tires.
Wasn't saying your posts were related to the P*, just bringing up the crazy nonsense in the manual. It is one thing to say it is "not recommended", which I can understand; It is another to say "NOT ALLLOWED", which implies that something like voiding your warranty would happen which is not true.

People here are better drivers at speed; people on the East Coast are better with navigating (as you wrote) narrower roads and also have better "instincts" in dense traffic conditions. Every area has its own idiosyncrasies. I definitely enjoy driving better here on the West Coast, though.
I have never encountered instances of people on the east coast having any issues with driving at speed. I definitely enjoy driving on the west coast better as well, but it is because of the roads, not the drivers. The roads out here are better in every possible way (better condition, wider highways and a lot more fun twisty roads with great scenery). (We're definitely off topic here but I think the OP got his answer already so it isn't a big deal).
 

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If you have ALL SEASON tires (and most are labeled M+S) plus AWD you can go through the "snow chain blockade"; I know I have... (Big Bear, Idyllwild, Mt. San Jacinto, Lake Arrowhead, etc.)
I believe what gets you past the snow chain blockade is the tire that has a snowflake on the sidewall. (along w/AWD) I drove the mountain passes in Oregon for 9 years, every week. 99% of the time the snowflake was enough. 2x's in that period the Troopers were chaining all cars. So very rare
 

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What's funny is that the P* manual has a part in big bold letter saying All Seasons are "NOT ALLOWED" on the car. Obviously we already have owners running All Seasons on them.
They should be punished immediately.

And they will be if they hit a pothole in said cold weather.
 

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This is good information, as here in Italy chains are required November - April unless you have all seasons/winters. I'm still on summers as snow doesn't accumulate here on the ground, but the Alps are in my backyard and it's tempting to go up there to ski. While I have chains in my trunk (to get the police off my back), I've never used them and haven't tried to put them on. I don't think I will because I don't think there's enough room between the wheel and wheel well. I had all seasons on my other cars, so this is a new dilemma for me. :thumbdown:
 

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So for driving a Polestar to Tahoe, get the 19" P* rims with winter tires and carry chains for the front wheels in case CHP demands it due to the conditions? Likely will never need to put the chains on going through chain patrol having AWD with winter tires. I can live with that for ski trips from the Bay Area. :)
 

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Well this is a good thread because I recently have taking my T5 AWD up through the snow to tahoe 3 times now.. and ALL 3 times AWD + All Season = No problemo at all.. CHP just did a quick look at my tire and I was good to go.. No chains at all.. I loled at all the Cars and FWD SUV's on the side of the road freezing their rear off and busting their fingers on chains....

Didnt even have 1 issue.. even in almost white out conditions.. Even on the butt clenching STEEP Descending hill on donner summit :p Not a problem at all.. And I grew up in NorCal and have driven through almost every type of mountain condition there is.

AWD and Summer tires - you will get sidelined if you have a picky CalTrans or CHP guy there.. But I have gotten through before in another vehicle with Summer tires.. Really all depends for those.


Regarding the latter part, it has become apparent to me in the past 3.5 years that I have lived in California, that the overwhelming majority of Californians are just not adept to drive well in rain and even more so in snow. Even those who go up to the mountains a few times per year. There are exceptions, of course, and the transplants from Midwest/Northeast who have had a ton of hands-on experience in driving under such conditions. In a similar statement to yours, when I go out in the rain or up in the mountains, I can tell who the native Californian drivers are. ;)
Also what Grecian said here ^^^ One LIGHT Drizzle and CA drivers freak out... They just can't handle it..
 
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