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Re: Amazing video of a Ford Explorer rolling over 7 or 8 times (tmtalpey)

Quote, originally posted by tmtalpey »
Actually, I think an XC90's DSTC combined with RSC would have possibly prevented this. The driver was on dirt and was overcorrecting when she hit the edge of the pavement. That shot the front of the vehicle back onto the road and the fronts grabbed pavement before the rear, the rears came around and then the car rolled.

DSTC would have decreased the intensity of the skid and given her enough control to avoid the overcorrection. That alone might have saved it, but RSC would have detected the rest. I predict an XC90 would have ended up on the left shoulder, pointing down the road.

Scary, eh?

Tom.

I, totally, agree with Tom. Actually, I wanted to post a similar reply last night but I did not have the time. It is tough to predict since an XC90 was not involced but I agree that the combination of DSTC with the RSD going all out to prevent the initial loss of balance (hence, the start of roll over) would (probably) have prevented an XC90 from rolloing over in that fashion.

Pro drivers had performed (successfully) the moose avoidance test at speeds exceeding 70 mph... (yeah, I know it is not the same but the concept is the same -- avoiding a rollover in an accident avoidance panic maneuver).

Yannis
 

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Re: Amazing video of a Ford Explorer rolling over 7 or 8 times (pattyweb)

Quote, originally posted by pattyweb »


IMO, concept is not even close to being the same. That driver did not try to avoid anything. They were bumped off course at high speed. No turning of the steering wheel or braking until the car was already thrown over some. Dynamics of the car were externally thrown off. Also, remember, soft banked shoulders.

In moose avoidance, you crank the wheel. Before the XC even deviates from the path, the rollover programming is already working for you to save you. Plus, flat pavement everywhere.

That is true but if we are going to assume certain things, then let's assume that the pavement between the road and the shoulder was smooth. Let us also assume that the cars "tapped", not crashed against each toher. I saw this, first, on TV. Much cleared picture and better focus than the clip I linked you to. The drivers tapped (if they did, who can really confirm that?) and then they both went different directions; the car realized what happenerd, panicked and cut to the right. The SUV driver did the same but to the left and then panicked even more (normal reaction for an untrained driver) and cut the wheel to the right with the results that followed.

The moose avoidance test is exactly that: AN EMRGENCY AVOIDANCE maneuver.

Again, I am not really claiming that an XC(0 would not have roled over. It could. But I think chances are that even if one of its wheels were to show a tendency to lift off the ground, chnaces are that it would not have rolled. But we will never know, will we?


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And remember, that driver WALKED away from that crash WITHOUT any of the extras that we have. Because they had their seatbelt on.

And THAT is the most important lesson for all!

Yannis
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Re: Amazing video of a Ford Explorer rolling over 7 or 8 times (pattyweb)

Quote, originally posted by pattyweb »

I personally am NOT in favor of moose avoidance simulations carried out on a parking lot as a comparison to a real world incident. The moose avoidance has it's purpose in that a driver can get a better feel for what the car is capable of.

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The moose avoidance test has no external influences on the test. Most real world incidents will have something external affecting the results.

I disagree with your interpretation of the moose test's purpose. It is designed to simulate a panic move, which can result in a roll over.

Last year, I was on my way to Baltimore, going south on I-95. I was on the left lane of the Havre de Grace bridge. You do not want your car taking a dive off that bridge. Traffic was moderate and we were all travelling at about 45 mph or so. The truck in front of me was a LATE model Nissan Armada. I even remember the color; white. It was occupied by three Japanese couples. I was following them with a gap of, perhaps, 10 yards between their car and mine. The next to them (travelling at just about the same speed if not a tad faster) was a black sedan (I forget what type). The sedan is a hair further along than the Armada when it decided to merge left (I assume the Armada was in his blind spot, even though it was a huge truck). Armada driver reacted very sharply to avoid the collision. I tap my brakes and watched the Armada'sleft rear wheel lift off the ground. Driver overcorrected (like the lady in the video) and entered the lane where the black sedan was which had sped further forward. The Armada's right rear wheel was completely off the ground until the driver turned, again, the wheel to the left and after a few zig-zags the Armada settled down. All this as we were all slowing down, meaning it happened at a low speed. That truck ALMOST rolled over.

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Volvo could just have easily setup a moose avoidance test that would have the drivers turning off into a soft shoulder. Or into a small curb. But they didn't. Why?

Then, the added cost of THOUSANDS ruined XC(0s (suspension damage) would have been passed to consumers like you; I am sure you all would be screaming if an XC90 2.5T AWD started at $42,000 instead of $34,000+.

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What's more realistic? A driver travelling 70mph in a empty parking lot needing to avoid a moose? Or a driver on a two lane road avoiding something or being bumped off course that the majority of the time will have them then travelling into either a soft shoulder, another car, curb, barrier, etc?

I am sorry but I, respectfully, disagree. It is not as simple as you portrait it to be.

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What confuses me is why don't car manufacturers design cars that won't start or run unless the seat belt is on? Or at least make it a setting (that we don't get charged $$$ to change) for those of us that want to be reminded. Or a non disablable (is that a word?) warning tone. There are rare times, I've forgotten. It would be a nice reminder.

pat

Awesome idea. Now, if you we could get the lawyers to lay off their sticky fingers off this one...


Yannis
 

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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Re: (pattyweb)

Quote, originally posted by pattyweb »


Exactly. And the 'Test' is always done by a pro driver that knows what he's doing and can manuever the car at high speeds. The 'Avoidance' demonstrations are done by people like us.

The pros will keep doing the test at different speeds to see how fast they can do it. The moose test isn't really an avoidance test because the driver knows exactly where they need to go. It's more a navigation test. Get around the moose as fast as you can?

How close to the moose does the driver need to get before he turns? I can picture for slower speeds the driver turning the wheel hard to get as close as possible to the moose. As they start going faster and faster they'll probably turn a little sooner and a little less abruptly so as to get around the moose and still stay in the course. The vehicle will pass.

Now do that test where the 'moose' abruptly pops up in front of the driver? I wonder how many drivers would still pass the test at upto x mph?

Just because a given vehicle can pass a moose test with a pro driver at x miles an hour doesn't mean it will pass at x with a novice driver. The novice may initially turn harder.The novice may not correct as smoothly. They may not correct at all. So many factors. This is not the vehicles fault

In the real world, we don't have that luxury. It's truly a panic. There's nothing panic about a 'moose avoidance' demonstration. Another reason why I think comparing it to the real world is not right.

How about the anecdotal story where journalists were given an XC90 (right before it launched, in Fall 2002) and were asked to try whatever (other than hitting the car) to make it roll over. Nobody even came close...

Yannis
 
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