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I have twice experienced a situation when driving in hot temperatures (summer's in Georgia), the air conditioning essentially stops working. I can hear the fan running and some cool air is trickling out of the vents, but the car gets really warm. The first time this happened, I took it into the dealer and they did a "system reset" that fixed the issue (they didn't find anything "wrong"). Yesterday, this happened again, and I left the car in my garage overnight and when I drove the car to work this morning the A/C was working as expected.

Has this happened to anyone else? Is there something that I can have my dealer look at / replace to have this permanently fixed?
 

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Wrong reading from cabin temperature sensor could cause this I think.
 

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ambient temperature sensors have gone bad causing ac not to work, usually more than a 10 degree difference between displayed temp and actual temp will cause problems. Ive seen a few with that problem. I have seen a few with ac condensor leaks from rocks that could cause ac system to shut off when it overheats from trying to compensate for low charge. Ive only seen one bad pressure sensor in a spa car cause issue with ac.
 

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Yup. Happened to me couple of weeks ago for the first time. Exact same scenario. Called the dealership and he said that the “flaps” that open up can freeze up during continuous use and prevents the air from coming into the cabinet.
I could hear the fan running too but zero air coming out. This is a huge flaw if that’s the case.
 

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Mine had the low pressure side hose explode near the compressor earlier in the summer. Had that replaced about a week later, but I was still hearing gurgling noises, and took it back again to get looked at. Dealer assured me everything was fine, and of course it wasn’t. Left for vacation with the whole family the following day, and got about 3 hours into our drive (we stopped an hour in), and I started feeling warm. I put my hand up to the vent to confirm low airflow, and over the next 10 minutes, the airflow was almost stopped. High 90s outside, so we drove with the windows down for a while, and then stopped at a gas station for an extended break. When we finally got back in to complete the trip, I wasn’t expecting cold air! Worked again for about 2 hours, then froze up again, but we were within 30 min of our destination, so we pushed through.
Had to call the dealership in Michigan myself, because Volvo told me they ‘don’t get involved’ or some nonsense. They were willing to tow the vehicle to the dealer, but the dealer wasn’t willing (or able?) to get me a loaner. After trying and failing to secure a rental car myself, I finally gave up, and at the end of the week, we did the entire return trip an hour or two at a time.
Took another week to get the part, which my home dealer described as a “resistor” which Volvo recommended as a fix (I guess the dealer and the manufacturer CAN work together?) I wish I could tell you what was actually done, but it no one really could explain it to me. In fact, I called Volvo a week later, and they argued with me, said a case had not been opened on my vehicle, and then sent me an email a week after I contacted them saying that “it is not possible to meet every expectation” and “the vehicle is working as designed and these are normal characteristics of the vehicle”.
Anyway, I figured it wasn’t worth any more of my time to try to find out.
 

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2018 T5 with 28,000 miles. Happened to me yesterday after driving about an hour on freeway in sunny humid 95 degree weather. A/C slowly went from fine to nothing.

Stopped for about 20 minutes for gas and bathroom break. AC worked perfect on restart and continued fine for rest of trip, 2 more hours.

Called dealer service manager from car, could tell right away he'd heard this before. He said it's becoming more common, that the evaporator is freezing so no air flow. Stopping for 5-10 minutes lets ice melt then all is good. He said Volvo does not have fix yet and he is supposed to report incidences of this complaint to Volvo. He also said problem might reoccur but might never happen again.
 

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There is a newly release TJ 34643 about this. Volvo dealerships have to check the AC cooling system to verify everything else is OK. Ac pressure OK, verify no AC leaks, AC control valve working properly, AC water/evap drain OK.
If above all OK then, the Technician, needs to submit a request to Volvo, order and install a resistor inline going to the evap temp sensor.
The following is my opinion,
Volvo needs to monitor which cars have this issue. Also Volvo has to test this inline resistor to make sure this will be a valid repair and fix. Probably when this resistor works and does not have a 2nd or repete freeze up event.
Volvo may make a butt load of these resistors to release to the Dealership network under normal channels and not on a restricted basis as it is now.
End of my opinion.
The Evap is freezing up due to the AC compressor not being turned off or cycled off as needed.
Volvo has been working on this issue. It takes time for any car manufacture to get reports, verify and correct the concern or issue. This one does takes time to find the problem and solution.
The poor AC cooling concern only happens after driving 3 hours or more without turning off the engine.
Hope this helps to better understand what is happening and the process to correct it.
 

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(Isn't it rather the outside temperature sensor (in the passenger side mirror) that causes the problem?)

The outside pass temp sensor can cause a problem. Mostly on 2016-2017 models. When causing ac cooling issues the outside temp will display 10° to 30° cooler in the inst panel that the outside temp.
If the faulty reading shows about <55° the AC compressor may not even turn on.
 

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The poor AC cooling concern only happens after driving 3 hours or more without turning off the engine.
Hope this helps to better understand what is happening and the process to correct it.
Yea mine wasn’t on for 3 hours. It happened in about 45 minutes. It only came back in after the car sat in heat after about an hour.
 

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I had this happen one time when we were driving in Virginia in some insane heat and humidity. Recalling an old home HVAC system I had that frequently "froze up," my fix was to turn OFF the AC and run just the fan/vent air. That worked for me. The air coming out was still cold, and the fan slowly gained power. After the air started to warm back up, I turned the whole thing back on and that was the end of that issue.

In theory, what happens is the AC condenser freezes up. The high humidity causes condensation that then freezes on the fins of the condenser. Once it freezes solid, it 1) stays frozen because the AC is still cooling the coils, and 2) the fan air cannot blow past a solid block of ice clogging the fins. The solution basically turns the coil off so it can defrost. Leaving the fan ON serves two purposes - 1) it blows air over the ice block, increasing the thaw speed, and 2) blowing the air over the ice block basically keeps your cabin cooling.

I'm not saying this is supposed to happen, or that it's OK - it shouldn't happen as it's a sign of other issues sometimes...but if it DOES happen, this was how I fixed it rather than sweltering in 100+ degree heat.
 
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