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Check out my thread<p><A HREF="http://forums.swedespeed.com/zerothread?id=115321" TARGET="_blank">http://forums.swedespeed.com/zerothread?id=115321</A>
 

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Re: 854 T5M for sale near Toronto (andru365)

Looking back at our countries' relations since World War II, we see that they were primarily commercial. When the Japanese economy exploded after the mid-1960s, trade between Japan and Canada expanded quickly as well. In fact, in 1972, Japan became Canada's second largest trading partner, ahead of the United Kingdom. During the 1970s and into the 1980s, Canada's interest in Asia, particularly Japan, grew, and the country began to regard itself as a Pacific power. This is how our two nations started to interact.<p>As a middle power, Canada decided on a multilateral approach while maintaining its alliance with the United States. Canadians were active in the United Nations as strong supporters of peacekeeping operations and arms control. In the meantime, Japan, as a rising economic power, was more concerned with enhancing its international status through its relations with the big powers, the U.S., the Soviet Union, and China. Consequently, during much of the cold war period, Japan and Canada had little contact with each other, at least as far as security was concerned.<br>----------------<br>helma<br><A HREF="http://www.accents2go.com/default.asp" TARGET="_blank">Stores Home Dйcor</A><br><A HREF="http://www.facilityfloormarking.com/" TARGET="_blank">floor marking</A><br>
 

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Re: 854 T5M for sale near Toronto (jack2009)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>jack2009</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">Looking back at our countries' relations since World War II, we see that they were primarily commercial. When the Japanese economy exploded after the mid-1960s, trade between Japan and Canada expanded quickly as well. In fact, in 1972, Japan became Canada's second largest trading partner, ahead of the United Kingdom. During the 1970s and into the 1980s, Canada's interest in Asia, particularly Japan, grew, and the country began to regard itself as a Pacific power. This is how our two nations started to interact.<p>As a middle power, Canada decided on a multilateral approach while maintaining its alliance with the United States. Canadians were active in the United Nations as strong supporters of peacekeeping operations and arms control. In the meantime, Japan, as a rising economic power, was more concerned with enhancing its international status through its relations with the big powers, the U.S., the Soviet Union, and China. Consequently, during much of the cold war period, Japan and Canada had little contact with each other, at least as far as security was concerned.<br>----------------<br>helma<p></TD></TR></TABLE><br>Umm, what?
 
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