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Those seals and washers appear to still be listed on various volvo dealers parts stores, although for totally different application.

962658 is listed for B28 Generator washers on 240/260/760 models (https://www.volvooftorontoparts.ca/p/42917894/962658.html)
960168 is listed for Gearbox Mounting applications in 240s models (https://www.volvooftorontoparts.ca/p/42907823/960168.html)

Does that even makes sense? I can get some great discounts ans save shipping costs if procuring locally so it may be a good option if those PN are official volvo ones.
 

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Be cautious. I have got search hits like that before which did not match up with the part I was looking for. I think Volvo recycled some of the part numbers. Some of the hits from the dealer websites are legitimate and quite often will have a vintage or classic designation, particularly if the part was also used on the later 240 cars. Volvo used some thins like O rings and such on later cars.

So, it may or may not be the part that you are looking for. If you want to be sure, order from VP or another vintage dealer who has a better parts description. If you want to take a chance .....
 

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957173 are not the phenolic washers. For some bizarre reason CVI does not catalog them. The part number is 962658

http://212.247.61.152/us/main.aspx?page=articlelist&requery=1&searchstr=962658&searchfld=

You need 8 of them. One below the injector holder and one above the injector holder (under the bolt and washer) so that the injector holder is sandwiched between the phenolic washers. The correct fat rubber O ring between the head and the injector holder for use with the phenolic washers is 960168.

http://212.247.61.152/us/main.aspx?page=article&artno=960168

VP's price for the phenolic washers is a bit high. Search a bit and you can find them for less. There used to be a retrofit kit which included the 8 phenolic washers and the 4 O rings for a nice price; but, I don't have the number. IPD might still list it.

Once the large locking collars around the injector bodies are released, you should be able to pull the injectors up and out of the holders without having to pull the injectors off of the rail. You may need to unbolt the cold start injector from the manifold so that the hose tap to the cold start valve has enough slack to allow you to pull the rail back. You may also need to remove the clips retaining the fuel hoses to the firewall to allow for more movement.

If the injectors have not been removed in the last 5 years, they will likely bond to the rubber pintel seals in the injector holder making removal a bit of a struggle. Don't yank on just one injector, try to pull each one up a bit so that they are all coming out evenly. If you yank on one injector and it pops loose with the others stuck in place you risk bending / kinking the fuel rail and then you are truly f****d. Once the injectors are released from the holders you are then free to unbolt the holder from the head and install the washers and new O ring.

You have the new pintel seals and the big rubber retainer ring on order. As noted by craig300, grease the rings and seals up with lots of silicone grease (dielectric tune up grease is perfect) to make things go back together easier (not necessarily easily).

If the injectors are original, while they are out and easier to inspect have a look at the rubber stub hoses that connect the injector to the rail. These stubs can deteriorate and start to leak, especially where the hose fits under the compression fitting on the injector. The injector does have a barbed fitting under the compression fitting so you can replace the stubs and use banded clamps to hold the stub hose on each end. You will carefully have to use a hack saw or dremel style cut-off wheel to cut off the old compression fitting. Unfortunately I cannot advise on good replacement fuel line. I am currently struggling to find 5/16" fuel line that lasts more than 3-4 years before it gets hard and starts to crack.
Just wanted to come back and thank you 142 Guy again. Finally got around to remove the whole injection set to replace all injector seals and install those phenolic fiber washers.
Pretty sure those holders were not removed in the last 20 years at the very least! What was left of the original o-rings looked more like nail clippings than anything else.

Result: now, when I turn off the engine, my garage doesn't smell like a gas station for the next few hours/days! I imagine I had a ton of fuel vapors espacing from the holder venting holes. Hot restart are infinitely easier, and so are the cold start somewhat. All of this can happen with a steady 1000 rpm too. Hot or cold! yay.

Took the time to sand and paint the original bare metal fuel rail and injector locking rings as they were all oxydized, rust stained from the metal spacers of the injectors. Replaced all fuel hose in the engine bay and replaced the whole lot of various garden-hose type clamps to proper fuel injection clamps. Also, turns out the fuel hose to the fuel rail were reversed, not sure it impacted the car really though.

However, although the car runs mighty well - probably the best it ever did in the 16 years I owned it - when first going out (either from a cold or warmed up from idle engine), I still get some hiccups. They do go away after a few accelerations, and after that, the car runs flawlessly for as long as I need to. Will do the same thing the next day however.

I am at a loss. I will see if the car runs ok with the TPS disconnected as a way to rule it out. The symptoms kinda match what SW-EM describe for failing PCB on those. I.e. bogging on acceleration but stable on steady throttle or idle. But in my case it all goes away after 3-4 acceleration...

Failing fuel pump? I know I have the original Bosch unit. But if it is failing, it wouldn't just bog down on the first few ask for additional fuel wouldn't it?
Failing manifold pressure sensor? What would that one's symptom be?
 

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142Guy; "I am currently struggling to find 5/16" fuel line that lasts more than 3-4 years before it gets hard and starts to crack."

I have some SS braid covered Teflon flex line in 5/16" ID (aerospace surplus)

...I think that's surely fuel and pressure compatible...and I'm thinking it is more permanent...the only question is how to clamp and install fittings compatible with our requirements...I might inquire at our local Areoquip branch...I think they can swage on fittings...any thoughts on using Teflon?

Cheers
 

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142Guy; "I am currently struggling to find 5/16" fuel line that lasts more than 3-4 years before it gets hard and starts to crack."

I have some SS braid covered Teflon flex line in 5/16" ID (aerospace surplus)

...I think that's surely fuel and pressure compatible...and I'm thinking it is more permanent...the only question is how to clamp and install fittings compatible with our requirements...I might inquire at our local Areoquip branch...I think they can swage on fittings...any thoughts on using Teflon?

Cheers
Ron:

I have seen the SS braided PTFE lined hoses. Primarily used on hydraulic systems with compression / swage style fittings. I had the local hydraulic hose specialist make up replacement brake hoses for my 142 using that style hose.

I think the problem will be the barbed fittings on the D jet's fuel system. The PTFE liner is very stiff and is not elastic. With effort, you might be able to deform it enough to jam over the barb; but, the deformation will be permanent and I expect will not seal well when clamped. To make this work, I think you would have to go The Full Monty and cut off the barbs and then modify the tubes to accept flare fittings that would match up with swaged fittings on the hose. I don't know whether the metal on the fuel rail and the fuel pressure regulator is amenable to being flared and whether you can get flare fittings in the correct sizes. The braided SS also strikes me as a bit Ricer / Dress-up so I think I will pass.

I know the Hi Performance Auto guys like Cohline hosing. Cohline does sell braided SS 'rubber' lined hoses for fuel systems. I was not able to find any distributors or vendors for Cohline in Canada so I went with Gates Barricade; but, it has only been a year since I did the replacement so too early to endorse it as a durable product.
 

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However, although the car runs mighty well - probably the best it ever did in the 16 years I owned it - when first going out (either from a cold or warmed up from idle engine), I still get some hiccups. They do go away after a few accelerations, and after that, the car runs flawlessly for as long as I need to. Will do the same thing the next day however.

I am at a loss. I will see if the car runs ok with the TPS disconnected as a way to rule it out. The symptoms kinda match what SW-EM describe for failing PCB on those. I.e. bogging on acceleration but stable on steady throttle or idle. But in my case it all goes away after 3-4 acceleration...

Failing fuel pump? I know I have the original Bosch unit. But if it is failing, it wouldn't just bog down on the first few ask for additional fuel wouldn't it?
Failing manifold pressure sensor? What would that one's symptom be?
The problem you describe does seem like a problem with the throttle position switch, in particular the enriching process that occurs as you open the throttle. Carry out the test procedures as described in the Volvo Fuel Injection Trouble Shooting manual, in particular looking for the repeated alternate opening and closing on terminals 9 and 20. You could have a problem with the comb select switch on the operating arm which should close as you start to open the throttle. If it is contaminated / dirty you could get a condition where it only works after being disturbed a few times. I recommend that you test the switch and carry out the maintenance process as described on Ron's website


In addition to a problem in the switch you could have a problem with the wiring to the switch. Something that is resulting in an intermittent short that is blocking the alternate open - close signals and perhaps disappears with a little engine vibration. Carefully examine the wiring at the plug on the switch. The insulation on the original wiring gets brittle with age and can crack and fall off leading to intermittent shorts. This is an ageing problem on just about all of the D jet engine wiring. I had to cut back and splice new replacement wiring on all of my injectors, the coolant temperature sensor and the TPS (when I still had the original D jet switch) because of crumbling insulation.

I doubt, that the fuel pump is your problem; but, a fuel pressure test is a good way to rule out fuel delivery as a problem. Low pressure can be caused by; a plugged fuel filter, fuel pressure regulator out of adjustment, fuel pressure regulator failure and fuel pump failure. If you have low pressure I would start with the first before working your way to the pump as the last problem. Note that if you have a significant fuel delivery problem your spark plugs will tell the tale. On older engines like the B20E the engine typically runs with AFRs less than 14.7 and the spark plug insulators will be light tan to brown in color. If the insulators come out white then you likely have a fuel delivery problem

If the engine runs fine at steady speed under load (cruising at 50 or 100 km/hr) then the problem is not your MAP sensor.
 

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Just ordered some Deoxit to help clean those contacts up. Definitely doesn't look brand new! That "seal" all around doesn't look great at all and the path seems less than perfect but it is continuous.

There was some white oxydation on the connections/solder points of the wires inside as well.
Cleaned the whole track and contacts with 99% isopropyl alcool and a cotton swap for the mean time. Short drive was flawless afterward, but I had already gone for a ride earlier this morning. I'll see what tomorrow brings!
127059
 

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Dalsim; That is the older style TPS, but it looks in decent condition...I'd clean any (internal as well as the external) connections well with cottonswabs (certainly of white corrosion products, and assure they have good spring pressure, and Deoxit for anti-corrosion,

142Guy; I agree with all of your concerns re the PTFE...it still seems worth checking out...and thanks for the reference!

Cheers
 

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After you get the contacts cleaned up (don't forget the two contacts on the rotating assembly, you might want to consider getting some non hardening sealant to replace the dried stuff around the edges and keep the internals clean. Stay away from RTV silicone seal. RTV uses acetic acid as the vulcanizing agent and as it sets up the acetic acid can damage soldered connections. Hylomar blue or its Permatex knock off is not meant for this particular application; but, it might be a suitable choice because it remains soft, seals well and facilitates future disassembly. Down side is its a bit pricey.
 

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142Guy;

The release of acetic acid is less of an issue now...as a reference, early RTV formulations offgassed it while curing, but the more recent formulation (such as G-E's Silicon II) releases less reactive (and odorless/offensive) methane. I don't know off hand about D-C 732 general purpose RTV, but a quick look at the data sheet should answer that...

Cheers
 

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After you get the contacts cleaned up (don't forget the two contacts on the rotating assembly, you might want to consider getting some non hardening sealant to replace the dried stuff around the edges and keep the internals clean. Stay away from RTV silicone seal. RTV uses acetic acid as the vulcanizing agent and as it sets up the acetic acid can damage soldered connections. Hylomar blue or its Permatex knock off is not meant for this particular application; but, it might be a suitable choice because it remains soft, seals well and facilitates future disassembly. Down side is its a bit pricey.
Thanks for the tip on the sealant. I do have on hand some anaerobic flange sealer from permatex, which seems quite similar to what you describe. Used that stuff when refitting the AAV and it does not harden at all. Is that the Permatex knock off of the hylomar stuff you mentioned?
 

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In respect of the fuel line, I inquired with Gates directly about their barricade 30R14T2 hose, and they replied it is “the latest and greatest and far better than the outdated J30r9 spec”. And is rated at 225PSI. So that’s good enough for me.
 

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Thanks for the tip on the sealant. I do have on hand some anaerobic flange sealer from permatex, which seems quite similar to what you describe. Used that stuff when refitting the AAV and it does not harden at all. Is that the Permatex knock off of the hylomar stuff you mentioned?
The Permatex knock off is called Permashield and the product number is 85420. This is about the lowest price that I have seen; but, I have no experience with this company
Permatex HYLOMAR BLUE GASKET MAKER | PER85420 | 85420 | THREAD AND GASKET SEALANTS (ohcanadasupply.ca)

NAPA usually carries it for around $17.
 

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The Permatex knock off is called Permashield and the product number is 85420. This is about the lowest price that I have seen; but, I have no experience with this company
Permatex HYLOMAR BLUE GASKET MAKER | PER85420 | 85420 | THREAD AND GASKET SEALANTS (ohcanadasupply.ca)

NAPA usually carries it for around $17.
Ever tried the Permatex Form a sealant #2? They got it at the local CTire for $7... Shows it is a non-hardening sealant too that resists all auto fluids (coolant, gas, oil)... Can't seem to find any comparator tool on permatex website (id. 58922 in Canada).
 

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I do have e a tube of Permatex #2 in my tool box. It is probably 20 years old and still appears to be good. It would probably work to seal the switch. It has been so long since I used #2 that I can't remember what removal is like. Permatex describes it as a non hardening sealant; but the TDS describes it as a "hard, semi-flexible sealant". My recollection is that meant it didn't get hard / brittle; but, I seem to recall that disassembly was not easy. The Hylomar blue is / was the favorite of small aircraft mechanics where stuff seems to be continually being pulled apart for regular inspections. It also goes on differently and is ready for use sooner. You apply the Hylomar to both surfaces, let it dry and then assemble. Disassembly is fairly easy.

As Ron notes, there are neutral cure RTV silicone sealants available which might be a good choice. I think that Permatex Ultra Black may be neutral cure. I have some Permatex Black (no ultra) and it is definitely vinegar heavy. However, I also have some Permatex Ultra Grey which has no vinegar odor so the Permatex Ultra RTVs may be a good choice.
 

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I do have e a tube of Permatex #2 in my tool box. It is probably 20 years old and still appears to be good. It would probably work to seal the switch. It has been so long since I used #2 that I can't remember what removal is like. Permatex describes it as a non hardening sealant; but the TDS describes it as a "hard, semi-flexible sealant". My recollection is that meant it didn't get hard / brittle; but, I seem to recall that disassembly was not easy. The Hylomar blue is / was the favorite of small aircraft mechanics where stuff seems to be continually being pulled apart for regular inspections. It also goes on differently and is ready for use sooner. You apply the Hylomar to both surfaces, let it dry and then assemble. Disassembly is fairly easy.

As Ron notes, there are neutral cure RTV silicone sealants available which might be a good choice. I think that Permatex Ultra Black may be neutral cure. I have some Permatex Black (no ultra) and it is definitely vinegar heavy. However, I also have some Permatex Ultra Grey which has no vinegar odor so the Permatex Ultra RTVs may be a good choice.
So I managed to find that Permatex equivalent to Hylomar. Got it for a very low price too at my local part store ($11 CAD). Great product to work with. The engine bogging on acceleration is also apparently fixed from cleaning with isopropyl alcool and Deoxit. Thanks so much for the tips.

Now I wonder if that Hylomar equivalent will attack paint... I'm thinking about using it to seal the under the vent window chromed plates instead of the foam/double-sided tape that was there before. Would make it so much easier to remove when doing work on the doors/windows.
 

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The SDS for Permashield says that the primary solvent is acetone. Most cured automotive finishes will resist acetone without problem. Acetone may dissolve a thin coat of spray bomb enamel.

As an alternative to using permashield for that application, consider 3M strip caulk.

3M™ Strip Caulk, 08578, black, 1 ft. (.30 m) (3mcanada.ca)

Suitably squishy so excellent for filling in around mounting holes on trim to prevent water ingress and may work better than permashield if you have a large gap that you are trying to fill. Sticky; but, not so sticky that it is hard to work with and allows for separation of parts without hassle. I used it recently to reattach the plastic liner behind the door card on another car I was working on. It is typically available from auto paint / body supply shops. I think I paid around $40 for a box. The down side is that unless you do autobody work on cars regularly you will now have a life time supply of strip caulk since there is 60 feet of caulk in the box and you are probably only going to use 6" for your application.
 

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This part of the forum doesn't seem to have much activity, but this is a thread that's had some recent activity. Anyone want this? Someone giving away...
 

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The SDS for Permashield says that the primary solvent is acetone. Most cured automotive finishes will resist acetone without problem. Acetone may dissolve a thin coat of spray bomb enamel.

As an alternative to using permashield for that application, consider 3M strip caulk.

3M™ Strip Caulk, 08578, black, 1 ft. (.30 m) (3mcanada.ca)

Suitably squishy so excellent for filling in around mounting holes on trim to prevent water ingress and may work better than permashield if you have a large gap that you are trying to fill. Sticky; but, not so sticky that it is hard to work with and allows for separation of parts without hassle. I used it recently to reattach the plastic liner behind the door card on another car I was working on. It is typically available from auto paint / body supply shops. I think I paid around $40 for a box. The down side is that unless you do autobody work on cars regularly you will now have a life time supply of strip caulk since there is 60 feet of caulk in the box and you are probably only going to use 6" for your application.
Ended up buying that strip caulk for the plates in front of thedoors/vents to shut off wind noise. Worked great. It was amazing too to refinish the Smiths bezels and seal the glass to the bezels.

On a side note, and back to that bogging issue again. The TPS cleaning was a good difference, yet the issue came back a bit throughout the summer. Before switching out the injectors with a different set, I tried a tank with injector cleaner product...... and it completely removed the issue (for now). That was unexpected - always thought of those cleaner as snake oil. Well it actually made a really good difference!
 

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Before switching out the injectors with a different set, I tried a tank with injector cleaner product...... and it completely removed the issue (for now).
Are you currently running on a new set of injectors or the injectors that you ran the cleaner through?

Be aware that there are two components to injector flow, offset (some people refer to as opening time) and flow rate once the injector is fully open. A bulk flow rate test (hold injector open for one minute and measure delivery) may validate the fully open flow rate; but, does not evaluate offset. The opening pulse width applied to the fuel injector varies with engine load. At idle the injector is probably open around 1.5 - 2 milliseconds per engine cycle increasing up to around 5 milliseconds per engine cycle at max load. If the injectors have become sticky leading to slow opening the change to idle fuel delivery is more significant (% wise) than at full load. Sticky injectors may give you poor response off idle; but work just fine at high load where the opening error has less effect.

If you are running new correctly specified injectors then offset errors should not be an issue. If you are still running the injectors that you ran the cleaner through you could still have offset errors. If you send the injectors out for cleaning and flow testing to someone like Witchhunter or RC Injector they should do a flow curve which will confirm that the bulk flow rate and offsets are correct.
 
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