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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New poster, but a longtime Volvo owner. We moved out west a couple of years ago and are thinking about a smaller travel trailer that we'd tow with our XC90. We also have an older XC60, but wouldn't even try.

We're looking at this guy, which Camping World will move up to Oregon for us:


The spec sheet says its dry weight is 2,945 LBS and our XC90 is max tow is 5,000lbs/500lbs tongue weight.

Based on what i've read elsewhere, this seems doable. Should I be concerned? Should I pull the trigger?
 

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2009 XC90 V8
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No reason you can't pull it based on the specs of the trailer and the specs on your XC90 - you correctly mentioned the dry weight, which is important to consider before adding fluids, food, gear, etc.

At the weight of the travel trailer, it's probably a good idea to look into a trailer brake setup on your car, and look into a weight distributing hitch as well. Both of these will make it easier to tow and will be less taxing on the XC90, and most camper dealerships can help set them up specifically for your car. If it's over short distances, neither are needed, but definitely recommended. Cross-country trip - absolutely. Just make sure you get a ball mount that is correctly rated and the right size ball. Great looking camper!
 

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2017 XC90 | T6 Momentum+; Crystal White Metallic/Amber
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as long as you’ve towed trailers before, you should be fine. We tow quite a bit with our XC90, and have been pleasantly surprised with how well it handles. The only thing I might recommend is getting your brakes completely redone before towing, and possibly upgrading the rotors and pads to “better” ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks everyone. Do folks have advice on a tow package here? My first instinct is always to buy the OEM tow package from Volvo and have our service team install it, but my first principle here is safety and if there is something better that is aftermarket to tow something that will probably be bumping up on the max we're comfortable with when its loaded (~3900- 4000 lbs or ~20% below the 5k max tow weight).

Has anyone been through this before? Any other advice re: break controllers, weight distribution, etc?
 

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2017 XC90 | T6 Momentum+; Crystal White Metallic/Amber
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Thanks everyone. Do folks have advice on a tow package here? My first instinct is always to buy the OEM tow package from Volvo and have our service team install it, but my first principle here is safety and if there is something better that is aftermarket to tow something that will probably be bumping up on the max we're comfortable with when its loaded (~3900- 4000 lbs or ~20% below the 5k max tow weight).

Has anyone been through this before? Any other advice re: break controllers, weight distribution, etc?
We have the OEM invisihitch and love it- my opinion is that it’s usually better to do OEM hitches.
 

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We’ve towed more than 25,000 miles and counting between our two XC90 varying in tow weights from 2200lbs to just over 5000lbs over a variety of terrain and trip lengths including to over 10,000 feet of elevation and even through heavy snow, and in our 2017 once while fully loaded with 7 passengers, our camping gear, 3 mountain bikes, 2 cyclocross bikes, and pulling our R-Pod.

@mjpierce11 - You’ll be fine! What you’re considering getting is totally within its design capability. XC90 are excellent tow vehicles with extra safety built in (Tow Stability Assist) when you use the Volvo tow module and harness.

The Jayco likely has e-brakes and in addition to getting the Volvo kit you may want to get the Prodigy RF brake controller. Given the weight it'll be ok without but better with one. When we summited a pass over 10k feet and >15% grade the enclosed cargo trailer we had at the time for that trip didn’t brakes and was at its 3500lbs capacity. As with any good mountain driving manually shifting not only makes it more enjoyable but also safer. At viewing outlook we encountered a genius in a GMC 1ton truck pulling his Harley trying to cool his brakes - they were smoking, the brakes - and his solution was to add more brake fluid. I made sure to let him leave first. I didn’t want to become his e-brake.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
THANK YOU!! This is all hugely helpful.
 

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Go for it! Anyone smart enough to ask questions will be safer than half the folks on the road towing anyhow =-D

Do keep in mind both the trailer weight but also the payload in the vehicle. The truth is you can max this out fairly quickly. The safer you plan the safer you will be.
 

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Go for it! Anyone smart enough to ask questions will be safer than half the folks on the road towing anyhow =-D

Do keep in mind both the trailer weight but also the payload in the vehicle. The truth is you can max this out fairly quickly. The safer you plan the safer you will be.
Very true on all counts! Many people forget and you see it on the road especially with vehicles that have high tow ratings where they look over loaded with either the rear suspension collapsed or it's nose in the air. The biggest thing to keep in mind and that will help avoid this is to keep not only below the tongue weight but also consider the total rear axle max load (combination of cargo in the car in addition to the tongue weight. Volvo's axle rating is very good and comparable to that of larger cars and that's where people with larger cars tend to make mistakes and you'll see the negative consequence of that. A car with a light front makes for not only poor handling, it dramatically reduces it's ability to steer properly. I've seen a 4Runner go sideways and flip onto its side from hauling a trailer that was either poorly loaded onto its hitch or simply had too much in the back lifting the front.
 
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