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Hello All,

It’s been a very long time since I’ve visited here, ever since I sold my 94 850 on here in 2014. As fate would have it, my wife is looking for a newer car than her 2008 Outback. She wants a wagon w AWD but hates how large the outbacks have become. I steered her towards a 2018 V60 T5.

She was in love with everything about it, my problem is I have no knowledge of these newer generation of turbo I-4s that Volvo has been using. I’ve researched some but I can’t find any definitive answer on this generation regarding reliability. I remember the older S60/V70 models having a fragile awd system, or is there any oil consumption or turbo issues? I’d just like to be as informed as possible before pulling the trigger on one.

Also, is the 2019 V60 a res designed model, newer engine or just a mid cycle refresh, I ask because 2018 would be the year to look for since it might be the last year of a model cycle with the fewest problems


Thanks All!
 

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Hello All,

It's been a very long time since I've visited here, ever since I sold my 94 850 on here in 2014. As fate would have it, my wife is looking for a newer car than her 2008 Outback. She wants a wagon w AWD but hates how large the outbacks have become. I steered her towards a 2018 V60 T5.

She was in love with everything about it, my problem is I have no knowledge of these newer generation of turbo I-4s that Volvo has been using. I've researched some but I can't find any definitive answer on this generation regarding reliability. I remember the older S60/V70 models having a fragile awd system, or is there any oil consumption or turbo issues? I'd just like to be as informed as possible before pulling the trigger on one.

Also, is the 2019 V60 a res designed model, newer engine or just a mid cycle refresh, I ask because 2018 would be the year to look for since it might be the last year of a model cycle with the fewest problems

Thanks All!
The early Drive-E engines have a chance for oil consumption. The original 2015s and some 2016s. You would definitely be out of that with a 2018. As far as reliability, it's still early in the engine's life cycle to say one way or the other. We're at 48k miles on our 2016 (which is within the serial number affected by potential oil consumption) and it has been without problem.

The 2019s are a complete redesign. However, the engine will be the same as the 2018s. Volvo only has the Drive-E engine for gasoline engines. The T5 is turbocharged and they add on a supercharger for the T6. The T8 is turbocharged and supercharged, with a plug-in hybrid system; there's a lot going on there. T8s are not yet available in North America on the V60.

The 2019s are a little larger. That little extra size on the outside is a big change on the inside for second row legroom and in the cargo area. 2019 V60s should begin arriving at dealerships this month. If curious about them, the S60s are available to get a good idea while waiting on the V60s. FYI the S60s are built in the US, however the V60s will be imported (I believe they're all being manufactured in Sweden at this time, but I wouldn't call that gospel). Also, I believe North America won't see the 2019 V60 Cross Country until summer.

Despite being a complete redesign, the 2019 S/V60s are the last vehicles Volvo has migrated to their SPA platform. Overall issues should be low for a year 1 model as this platform is used for their entire line except for the XC40.
 

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Hello All,

It's been a very long time since I've visited here, ever since I sold my 94 850 on here in 2014. As fate would have it, my wife is looking for a newer car than her 2008 Outback. She wants a wagon w AWD but hates how large the outbacks have become. I steered her towards a 2018 V60 T5.

She was in love with everything about it, my problem is I have no knowledge of these newer generation of turbo I-4s that Volvo has been using. I've researched some but I can't find any definitive answer on this generation regarding reliability. I remember the older S60/V70 models having a fragile awd system, or is there any oil consumption or turbo issues? I'd just like to be as informed as possible before pulling the trigger on one.

Also, is the 2019 V60 a res designed model, newer engine or just a mid cycle refresh, I ask because 2018 would be the year to look for since it might be the last year of a model cycle with the fewest problems

Thanks All!
If you're looking for the best deal, good reliability and don't need the newest gadgets then I would totally go for the 2018 MY. The T5 drive E engine is not only fuel efficient but it's also super peppy and quick. In my 2016 S60 T5, I usually average 26 mpg in the city and it hasn't had any issues at all. The 2019 V60 however is very attractive and has almost every modern tech feature (keep in mind a well, a well option 2018 model has almost all of the same features). Of course a 2018 won't have that huge central touchscreen. Another thing to keep in mind is SPA car reliability. I have a 2019 XC90 that we've owned for around 7 months now and it hasn't had any reliability issues. However, there have been annoying periodic software glitches that show up and then go away at the most random times. IMO the last generation would be a more bulletproof option but at the same time I don't think you can go wrong with either one. Whichever you choose I think you'll be satisfied in the end.
 

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If you go with the 2018 model and you intend to carry people in the back seat, make sure they are double amputees.
 

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I'm currently driving a 2019 S60 loaner. The rear legroom in the 2019 compared to my 2015 V60 is significantly larger. Putting a rear facing car seat in the 2015 V60 forces the passenger seat way far up. Adults are not comfortable in my backseat, but are comfortable in the back seat of the 2019 S60.

The touchscreen is really nice in the new car, BUT, I don't think it is a good replacement. There is a serious lack of buttons on the dash and it is disappointing in everyday driving. I hate having to use the screen to change basic climate control settings. Many cars that rely on large touchscreens allow for some adjustment via buttons. That would have been the way to go, so I think Volvo blew it on that one. The buttons on the wheel only control volume and skipping tracks/stations. They don't go into an out of menus like on the last generation. There are small menus in the instrument cluster so you can do very basic things like change audio source or cancel your route guidance, but nothing else. You could essentially do everything from the steering wheel on the older cars. Putting in locations for the navigation is better with the touchscreen at least. The loaner I am driving is suffering from a broken voice function. I can't use voice control AND it isn't reading out any directions when I use navigation. It also rebooted on me twice one morning. Android auto is nice, but doesn't make up for the system's other shortcomings.

The 2019 has some more standard features that were options on my car. I like the backup camera, lane-keeping aid, auto brake hold, and road sign information. A spare is also standard on the 2019.

They drive pretty similarly. My loaner is a T6 and I am NOT getting good mileage (22 mpg). The drive mode is more customizeable on the new car, but even in eco mode, it doesn't get good mileage. The car feels most at home in comfort mode. With its dynamic (sport) mode, it feels like a comfortable car trying to be sporty. Maybe an R-Design with the sport chassis or an Inscription with the active chassis it would feel more sporty, but the feel of standard suspension isn't any more sporty than any other luxury sedan.
 

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If you go for a leftover 2018 or earlier V60, chances are you can get a screaming good deal as they are trying to get rid of the last ones since the new V60 will be here shortly. My local dealer is showing $8k off their remaining three V60s (although they are all R-designs).

One other issue that has affected some drive-e engines is engine pinging when the engine is under load at low RPMs, like when climbing a hill at speed. Some people have experienced it worse than others. Personally, I had this problem intermittently and could infrequently replicate it at will. There is a TSB to replace the spark plugs; after that service was performed, I found the problem disappeared. There's a long thread about it -- search "clicking sound" and you should find it.

Personally, while I love the look of the new V60, I am not a fan of the large touch screen Volvo now uses. My folks own a 2017 XC90, and it is way too complicated -- things that should require just a quick push of a button instead requires multiple pokes and swipes on the screen. If you live with it you would get used to it, but I personally find it to be unintuitive. Since I only use drive their car on occasion, I have a hard time knowing where to find and how to use basic functions.
 

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They drive pretty similarly. My loaner is a T6 and I am NOT getting good mileage (22 mpg). The drive mode is more customizeable on the new car, but even in eco mode, it doesn't get good mileage.
Lol the car's rated at 21 mpg in the city. I'd say 22 is pretty good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the info all, I think we would be looking at a used 2018, as the tech in one is stil ligh years ahead of a base model outback from 2008. We did test drive one and she loved everything about it. Our only other consideration is a previous gen Acura TLX w sh-awd. Just trying to find one f/s so we can test drive to compare both cars.
 

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Thanks for the info all, I think we would be looking at a used 2018, as the tech in one is stil ligh years ahead of a base model outback from 2008. We did test drive one and she loved everything about it. Our only other consideration is a previous gen Acura TLX w sh-awd. Just trying to find one f/s so we can test drive to compare both cars.
Just a note we've owned two Acuras for long periods TSX and TL and the interiors wear like crap, our seats in the TSX started to rip after 4 years. We bought the car brand new in 2011, slowly the center console lid cover started ripping and then the door panels. Seriously, I don't know if the leather is even real. In some places it's literally paper thin (not an exaggeration). I loved the way both of the Acuras handled, but my OCD was triggered every time I got in it. There were also other problems, there were many recalls that affected my car and thousand others, a leaking windshield, the catalytic converter broke and our dealership was so bad. I probably won't consider buying another car from them for a long time. Not trying to bash Acura here as their newer cars look like much higher quality products, but I wanted to share my experience.
 

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I did a lot of research comparing the 2018 vs the 2019 V60. I hated the larger size of the 2019 and I really hated the large touch screen. I got $11k off the 2018. It's a T6 AWD with a Polestar tune. It's a perfect car for me. Save yourself the extra $.
 

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The Consumer Reports Buying Guide 2018 averages reports from owners of the S60 for 2012-2016 (no V60, but should be similar reliability), and it gives very good reliability for all but the 2015 model year. Personally, I'm waiting for the new V60 because it is longer and has more space than the 2018 edition, but I'm going to wait til 2020 because I really hate the Sensus screen and I'm really looking forward to the new Google/Android screen that will replace Sensus (and I'm sure the Sensus name will disappear) this coming year. I think that Sensus will be really obsolete in comparison to the new computer/screen; Volvo has admitted that they aren't good at creating infotainment systems and are letting the experts do it for them -- bravo!
 

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If you're under 6 feet tall the back seats aren't that bad. I'm 5'11 and legroom in the back wasn't as bad as I expected.
It's not so much the actual legroom but the lack of room for your feet during ingress / egress that makes it awkward.
 
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