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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi.
We just received the following pricing on both the 2012 and 2013 xc60. Just wanted to see if you all agree this is a good deal! Something to keep in mind, we are trading in two cars, a 2008 Acura TL and a 2003 Lexus ES300. Trade in Value around $22k to $23,300 for both.

2012 Volvo XC60 with Premier
MSRP is $34,174
We will sell it for $29,127 plus tax and tags.

2012 Volvo XC60 with Premier Plus, Climate Package and Blis
MSRP is $44,420
We will sell it for $39,500 plus tax and tags.

2013 XC60 FWD with Premier
MSRP is $38,045
Selling price $34,990 plus tax and tags

2013 XC60 FWD with Premier Plus
MSRP is $39,945
Selling price $35,990 plus tax and tags

2013 XC60 AWD with Premier
MSRP is $40,045
Selling price $37,300 plus tax and tags

Any thoughts? Thanks!!!
 

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It will be tough for anyone to assess your cars' trade values since they do not have a visual assessment of their condition, mileage, local market conditions, etc.

Have you compared prices between this Volvo store and another?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
we have compared pricing and this is the best so far. The number for our cars is based on what two dealerships assessed the trade in value of our cars, one at 22k and the other at 23,300.
 

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we have compared pricing and this is the best so far. The number for our cars is based on what two dealerships assessed the trade in value of our cars, one at 22k and the other at 23,300.
Cool. Then, it does not matter what anyone else thinks as we are all in different parts of the country and you can get 100 different price structures! ;)

Other than how the numbers lay out, you will also need to assess which Volvo store (and its sales/service staff) you feel most comfortable with since this is a major purchase and aftersales support is huge. The numbers will be the numbers (and it seems you are not getting prices that deviate in a major way from each other); giving your business to people you feel comfortable with and feel they are going to take care of you, after the sale, should be the bottom line. Best of luck! :)
 

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In theory, the value of your trade(s) is independent of the cost of the new vehicle. You should get a firm 'offer' on your trade, regardless of the vehicle being purchased. If they say they will give you $1000 more on the trade, it's likely being added to the price of the new purchase. Conversely, auto-buying-gurus always want you to work your best price on the purchase BEFORE ever talking trade. That way, you have a clear picture of what your vehicle is bringing instead of some smoke and mirrors deal that inflates one price in order to offer more on the trade.

In reality, all you NEED to know is the difference...what you will be out of pocket. It matters not if they 'show' your vehicle to be worth $10K more if all they do is add $10K to the price of the new vehicle. Depending on the state of residence, you may pay sales tax only on the difference between your trade and the price of the new buy. Something to keep in mind IF you decided to sell your vehicle(s) instead of trading. In Texas, that trade would save you $1300 in sales tax vs selling your car and buying the Volvo outright.

You've got a fair amount of low-to-high difference in the value of your trade(s). That number should be firm for any of the vehicles you purchase from that dealer. If the trade value varies, that just means they are monkeying around with the sales price of the new buy. The real question is: "How much will I write the check for when I trade my vehicle(s) for 'this' model I'm considering?"

I've got to say, I like Premier Plus; but if you don't need all the goodies, that $29K for a new XC60 with Premier is pretty sweet sounding to someone who dropped $48K for his '10 T6 back in '09. That's one heck of a vehicle for under $30K.
 

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AND I agree with Grecian that the dealership can make a big difference. We had four to choose from in Atlanta...in Austin, only one. I have to say I've been pleased with the service dept, although you can tell from my sig that the sales staff and I had a little disagreement a few weeks ago.:(
 

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In theory, the value of your trade(s) is independent of the cost of the new vehicle. You should get a firm 'offer' on your trade, regardless of the vehicle being purchased. If they say they will give you $1000 more on the trade, it's likely being added to the price of the new purchase. Conversely, auto-buying-gurus always want you to work your best price on the purchase BEFORE ever talking trade. That way, you have a clear picture of what your vehicle is bringing instead of some smoke and mirrors deal that inflates one price in order to offer more on the trade.

In reality, all you NEED to know is the difference...what you will be out of pocket. It matters not if they 'show' your vehicle to be worth $10K more if all they do is add $10K to the price of the new vehicle. Depending on the state of residence, you may pay sales tax only on the difference between your trade and the price of the new buy. Something to keep in mind IF you decided to sell your vehicle(s) instead of trading. In Texas, that trade would save you $1300 in sales tax vs selling your car and buying the Volvo outright.

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See, I do disagree with the point in your first paragraph but I totally agree with the one I boldfaced.

The trade value of a car is exactly what it says...TRADE. Therefore, the assessed value of a car can vary depending on what sort of transaction one is willing to undertake.

For example: if one shows up at a dealership with a 2000 Toyota Camry that is in average shape and has 110,000 miles, he/she cannot demand ONE price and one price only as far as its value is worth. Personally, if I had a store I may not want to keep that car. Most new car dealerships do not have the Carmax mentality or business model. Therefore, they have a higher incentive to take a car that normally they would not keep if the seller is willing to trade it for a new or used car from their store. One can step up and think "I think the car is worth $xxxx but since they are going to buy a new/used car from me I will add another $xxx to make the deal happen". Otherwise, there is no incentive.

I understand the motive to work out your best deal on the new purchase and isolate the trade. On the other hand, expecting ONE price on the value of the car you want to get rid of whether you are buying a car or not is not realistic. In the end, as you wrote very correctly, all that matters is the bottom line; the difference you will have to come up, out of pocket, to consumate a deal. :cool:
 
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