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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings all… happy to be a new member of the vintage Volvo community. New owner of a 1966 122S 4dr (168K, B18 w/ SU HS6s, M40, Skandix header/exhaust), first-time post after months of following.

Car is in overall good shape, excepting a previous fender repair (to be replaced, spare on hand), some other bodywork and repaint as future project. Having a great time getting to know the car and building an even deeper appreciation for the Amazon.

As good as the car is, two issues:

- Stumble on acceleration with a hiccup/pop; likely happens when moving after initial startup and on road occasionally when you give extra gas at speed (like accelerating in 3rd gear) once warm. Have done nothing to the SUs other than spray carb cleaner, check oil servicing, and a bottle of Techron through the tank. Cleaned K&Ns, changed fuel filter (added pre-pump filter) and plugs; and wires/cap/rotor (Pertronix mod) appear good.

- Intermittent difficulty engaging gear (any) from neutral with motor running, shifts OK once rolling; seems less of a problem once warm. Slave and master cylinder replaced within last several 1K miles, recently bled. Adjusted clutch (has about 20K on it) at fork to green book specs; nearly out of threads on pedal adjustment; not sure if either adjustment is making much of a difference.

Thoughts?


Chris
 

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Stumble on acceleration could be that you're running too lean. Could also be a misfire - have you checked/replaced the spark plugs? Here's a pretty good video for baseline tuning the HS6s.


Also check that your timing advance is correct. It should be around 10 degrees BTDC on idle and increase up to 33 or 34 degrees BTDC at ~4000 RPM if I recall correctly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the advice and video link; good overview of SUs and basic adjustment procedures.

Once the car is warmed up, the stumble issue is intermittent; it can happen (single hiccup) when you give just a bit of throttle once you’re up to speed. Will check timing again, but think advance took it up to around 33 deg. Changed out the plugs (old ones looked about right), but have held off futzing with the carbs so far; your video link nudges me that much closer to digging in, once I deal with a temp gauge swap (first priority at this point).

Thanks again!

Chris
 

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Check that your choke cables aren't snagging anywhere (mine were and sometimes my car would start idling at 2000rpm out of nowhere). SUs are very easy to take apart and clean so I'd definitely recommend that just as a matter of course. Make sure you fill the dashpots right up with either Type 5 ATF or 3-in-1 oil. Just stay away from multiviscous engine oils.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Good idea... thanks again.
 

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The shift thing. Is it grinding when to put in in reverse. Parked of course! If there's no problems engaging reverse the clutch is disengaging properly.

Those trannys are pretty tough but flat towing them in nutral very far will kill them. (and any other manual transmission I can think of) Other "weakness" is were the shifter fits in the top. It gets warn out every 50 years or so.

It does sound like a clutch issue so let us know what reverse does.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Whenever it does hang up (intermittent) the shifter hangs up when going into any gear. Of course, it'll go right into any gear with the motor off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks; not sure if the previous owner changed out the throwout bearing with the clutch 20K ago. Anything else you'd suggest I look for?


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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
According to records, it looks like the pilot bearing was changed with the clutch.


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That doesn't mean anything. A tiny burr on the transmission input shaft can screw up a brand new pilot bearing in a hurry. So can inadequate clearance, or insufficient lubricant, or incorrect lubricant. The pilot bearing is oft overlooked, but can have a significant impact on clutch performance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Got it; thanks for the info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hi all,

Finally getting around to following through on the recommendations from this august group; have a few questions before changing out my 122S' M40 clutch, most notably:

- Do I have the correct throwout bearing for the hydraulic clutch (see pic)? The Haynes manual cites "the thrust bearings are not the same for the different clutch types." Is this differentiating between hydraulic vs. cable, or Sachs vs. Borg & Beck? The Sachs clutch is currently installed.

- Pilot & Throwout bearing lube: aside from applying the lube packets that came with the clutch kit to the shaft splines and contact surfaces of the bearings, do either require any additional packing with grease? If so, what type grease would you recommend?

- What is the best grease to apply to the release fork pivot ball and fork sockets?

This is my first clutch job in a long time, and first for an Amazon. Any other tips are most welcome.


Cheers,

Chris





 

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That is the correct T.O. bearing for a Sachs clutch regardless of whether it's cable or hydraulic. The Borg & Beck clutches take a different one.

Just wipe a bit of the grease that came with the kit on the input shaft splines. I don't think there's any point in greasing the fork or its pivot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks much, Phil!
 

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Speaking of forks, check to see if yours is cast iron or stamped steel. If stamped steel, it could be bending, which causes drag (and difficulties going into gear). The solution is easy--look for a cast iron fork, and exchange with the stamped steel. If you can't find a cast iron fork, you can do an effective kluge by strengthening the stamped steel one. There are various ways of doing so, but wait until you need to know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
That makes sense... will check it out. Thanks for the tip.
 

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I have a cast one I'd sell cheap if you find you want it.

Gorgeous color and nice wheels on your 122 there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks, Lloyd... appreciate the offer. It looks like I've got a cast iron fork, but if I find anything wrong with it when I get it out over the holiday break, I'll give you a yell.

After the clutch is sorted out, bodywork's next with a strip & paint. As much as I like the color, the paint's a 10-footer, with petrified seals all around. Original color was Dark Blue 90, which I also like (especially since seeing the restored 2-door recently sold), but I'm leaning toward the current color if I can get the paint shop to match it.

The more time I spend with this car, the more I'm impressed with the Amazon.
 
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