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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hiya,

Long story short, purchased a dog, needed oil trap replacement, both turbos replaced, timing belt with W/P and everything else. Had no issues before repairs except smoking badly. After repairs runs like a raped ape for 100 feet then goes into limp home throwin code P0234 Overboost Condition.

I have cleaned and checked MAF, Boost sensor, Boost valve , but no love, hits 10+ PSI as soon as you nail it.

Any ideas?
 

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who did the job? does the shop know how to replace the timing belt?. Also sounds that the TCV in your car is connected wrong so yo uare overboosting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Did all the work myself, I have a fully equipped shop. Do you happen to know what line goes where? I can't seem to find alot of information about the XC90 T6. If you could provide an overview of the turbo system operation that would be excellent!
 

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thanks to SBMech, I found and was able to fix the same issue.

here's a little bit more detail on this...
location:
between the firewall and the turbo pipes, there are two 1/4" aluminum tubes coming from the turbos and meet up at a Tee just below where the Tranny fluid dipstick bracket. One of the aluminum tubes runs alongside the length of the engine and the other one comes from underneath.

problem:
The 1/4" aluminum tubes transition into a rubber tubes and a plastic Tee. These rubber tubes get brittle over time and in our 11 year old T6, the left side tube broke off completely where the aluminum tube met rubber. To me, after having repaired this issue, it points to a bad design/engineering. these tubes are almost inaccessible and requires removal of so many parts in order to replace them, luckily there are always hacks:) I imagine taking this to the dealer gets really expensive.

solution:
your favorite Auto parts store sells the same tubes for less than $2/foot.

tools required: 11" needle nose pliers with 45Degree tip, standard set of socket wrenches, flashlight, foot stool/chair

how-to:
1. The problem is removing the old part and installing the replacement. As you will notice, it's quite cramped in that location. In order to create space, Remove the stabilizer/strut bar. Be careful not to drop the nuts since you won't see it again unless you take apart the rest of the car.
2. unscrew the bracket that serves as cowl pins and also as cover for the 1/4 aluminum tubes and move it aside. This gives you space to insert the new rubber tube.
3. In order to gain access to the area, you need find a way to be directly on top the engine and looking down into the back of the engine. I used the top plate that covers the radiator and oil filler cover as support to kneel down into the area. (this is probably where most people would give up and take it to the dealer instead).
4. using both hands, push the Tee around just enough to have space to use the needle nose pliers to remove the host clip. There is just enough slack to do this.
5. install replacement tube using the needle nose pliers and re-install all other parts you took off to gain access to the area.
 
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